Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Militia" ...

  • Gun Wars: A News21 Investigation of Rights and Regulations in America

    An examination of the contentious political and cultural divide between those who say the right to own and carry guns is guaranteed by the Second Amendment and those who believe firearms should be more regulated. The project used or created nine databases to assess gun laws in every state in the nation and to document violence involving firearms across the United States. We also conducted hundreds of interviews across the country with longtime politicians, shooting victims, militia members, rural sheriffs, hunting enthusiasts, inner-city mothers and advocacy groups on all sides of the debate, to name a few.
  • Return to Benghazi

    In Return to Benghazi, Arwa Damon takes viewers back to the scene of a deadly embassy attack by unknown assailants. Damon's landmark reporting in this program led the U.S. to name the first suspect believed to be involved in the attack. On the night of September 11, 2012, four Americans including Ambassador Christopher Stevens were killed. It was a violent, well-coordinated attack that shocked the world. No one took responsibility for the killings. Libyan and U.S. officials did not know who to blame. A political firestorm erupted in the U.S. amongst lawmakers demanding to know what U.S. officials knew about the leadup to the attack. CNN's Arwa Damon arrived in Benghazi just days after the attack to cover the story. She spoke to witnesses and visited the compound where the Ambassador lived. It was there where she found Ambassador Stevens' diary. The FBI and the Libyan government vowed to find those responsible and bring them to justice, but justice did not come swiftly. It would be weeks before FBI teams would inspect the crime scene. Months passed and still no suspects were identified. Several months after the attack, Arwa Damon goes back to Benghazi to get an update on the investigation. She finds a changed city where westerners have fled and citizens face unexplained violence. Militias increasingly rule the streets and security forces struggle to keep control. Even more omonous, are the alarming signs of support for Al Qaeda that have emerged in less than a year. Damon tracks down the headquarters of Ansar Al Sharia, a group many Libyans and U.S. officials suspected might be behind the attack, but the group isn't talking. She also speaks to a Libyan rebel intelligence chief who blames a factions of Al Quada for the attack. The government is reluctant to move against either of them. In a rare interview, Arwa Damon sits down with a man U.S. officials have often suggested they would be interested in speaking to about the night of the attack: Ahmed Abu Khattala. He admits to Damon that he was at the compound that night while the attack was taking place. He also tells her no one from the FBI had tried to contact him, but that he would be willing to meet with them if it was a conversation and not an interrogation. After the program aired, an outraged U.S. Representative Jason Chaffetz told reporters, "News out today that CNN was able to go in and talk to one of the suspected terrorists, how come the military hasn't been able to get after them and capture or kill the people? How come the FBI isn't doing this and yet CNN is?" U.S. federal authorities then filed charges against against Khattala, suspecting him for being involved in the attack. Arwa Damon's reporting in Return to Benghazi not only showcased the powerful investigative journalism that CNN is known for, but it also sparked movement in the stalled investigation of the September 11, 2012 embassy attack.
  • Benghazi: US Consulate Attack

    On September 11, when a militant group overran the US consulate in Benghazi resulting in the death of the ambassador, the initial information was contradictory. Much of it got mixed up with other reports out of the Middle East about anti-American demonstrations over an inflammatory film on the Internet that was said to insult Islam. Damon arrived quickly in Benghazi to sort out the conflicting information and went to the burnt consulate ruins, which, though looted, held valuable clues to the truth. Her reporting revealed that there was not a demonstration and that it appeared to have been a planned attack that unfolded simultaneously from three sides. She discovered that U.S. diplomats had been warned by Libyan officials three days before the attack that the security situation in the city was out of their control. Though her reporting received harsh public criticism from the State Department at the time, the U.S. government’s own investigation later proved her reporting to be accurate in an episode that continues to reverberate politically. Damon also spoke to Libyans that tried to save the ambassador that night, shedding light on what happened to him during his final hours. While she was in Benghazi, demonstrations erupted against the militia believed to be responsible for the attack, and Damon further reported on the rise in extremism in the newly-liberated country. Her reporting provided additional valuable context about the milieu in which the consulate attack occurred.
  • Following the Bloodshed of America's Wars in the Muslim World

    The book examines the Iraqi civil war, its causes and how it came to an end. It provides the persepective of Iraqi militiamen, Iraqi security forces, Iraqi civilians, and American soldiers, officers and officials.
  • Katrina's Hidden Race War / Body of Evidence

    The stories describe racial conflict that occurred in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. "Katrina's Hidden Race War" chronicles the formation of an armed militia in a predominately white neighborhood that shot at African American males suspected of looting. "Body of Evidence" outlines the death of Henry Glover and the New Orleans Police Department's refusal to seek medical attention for him. Glover's incinerated body was later discovered behind the Fourth District police station.
  • China's Cyber Militia: Congress in the Cyber-Crosshairs

    "This series focused on the threat of 'cyber' espionage against the U.S. government and U.S. corporations, as well as electronic interference with U.S. infrastructure, all by Chinese authorities or groups believed to be working under their auspices."
  • The Abbeville Horror

    Moser writes a shocking and moving expose of a shootout in Abbeville, South Carolina that failed to receive national attention. A family with extremist ties killed two local officers. Moser investigates just how strong those ties were and if the supremacists' violent past is really past.
  • The .50 Caliber Militia

    BNNtv investigates the militia movement in America. Contrary to ideas that the militia movement is declining BNNtv found it thriving. BNNtv traces an underground network of traffickers in the extremely lethal .50-caliber sniper rifle. The story reveals that the State Commander of the infamous Michigan Militia was almost caught in an ATF raid at the home of a convicted felon and gun dealer in Arizona.
  • Plan for Colombia

    The Express-News looks at the United States' efforts to eradicate drug trade in Colombia by spending $1.3 billion on army operations aiming to destroy coca fields. The series questions the effectiveness of the plan. Coca farmers account for the majority of the population in Columbia, and the project would be more successful, if they were provided some alternatives. The reporter examines how the drug war combines with the civil war that has been going on for decades, and finds "that it's unlikely that any significant change will come in Colombia's status as a drug exporter until the civil war is ended."
  • The Last Days of the Mountain Kingdom

    The Outside Magazine looks at the new development of the "people's war" declared by a hard-line faction of communists in Nepal. The story describes how, after the royal family has been murdered, "Maoist guerrillas prowl the countryside, killing police with handmade grenades, extorting protection money from trekkers, and fomenting agrarian revolution." The author analyses the risk of a new "Asian apocalypse."