Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Navy" ...

  • Pentagon secretly struck back against Iranian cyberspies targeting U.S. ships

    In the middle of June, tensions were rising between the United States and Iran. Iran had attacked oil tankers traveling through the Strait of Hormuz, and then downed an expensive, high-tech Navy RQ-4 Global Hawk surveillance drone flying over the Strait, upping the ante of the conflict. Given previous rhetoric from Trump administration officials including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo against the Iranian regime, the decision to exit the Iran deal or the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, and the increasingly heavy sanctions on Iran, the Yahoo News team was monitoring for chances to report in more depth on specific Iranian capabilities as well as U.S. plans to counter them. Following the attack on the U.S. drone, Yahoo News began communicating with sources who had extensive detail on a specific unit within the Iranian military in the cross-hairs of the U.S. military, a unit that had advanced its cyber capabilities to the point that it was able to track nearly all ships traveling through the Strait through both social engineering, or pretending to be attractive women engaging with service members traveling on the ships, to actually compromising ship GPS data websites in order to digitally monitor their paths. In the course of reporting, Yahoo News discovered a key, news breaking event—that just hours prior, the U.S. Cyber Command had launched a retaliatory strike aimed at limiting the capabilities of the specific Iranian cyber group the team had already been investigating. Yahoo was the first to break the news of the retaliatory strike, leading dozens of major news outlets to race to match the story. However, given the fact Yahoo News was investigating details into the cyber unit, our story was not only first but best and most detailed. The story demonstrates our ability to jump into the news cycle, provide key breaking news to our readers, as well as dig deep into illuminating new details. The story also revealed that Iranian capabilities to intercept and down drones to study them for espionage purposes was highly advanced, a fact previously unknown. Given President Trump’s recent decision to authorize a strike to kill IRGC Commander Qasem Suleimani, our reporting will continue to provide value to readers, analysts, and other interested parties hoping to better understand Iranian capabilities and how the U.S. might respond to them.
  • Military.com: Aviators Kicked Out

    The U.S. military prides itself on its colorblind attitude to race and its increasing diversity. Why, then, does the field of naval aviation remain overwhelmingly white, and less diverse in some areas now than two decades ago? Three black aviators who share remarkably similar stories of getting expelled from the training pipeline say unconscious bias is to blame. These former trainees, some of whom remain in appeals with the Navy, say they're just as good as their white peers, and an instructor backs their assertions. Investigations, formal complaints, and a troubling aviation instructors' chat history paint a picture of an environment that dooms minority aviators from the moment they set foot on the flightline.
  • The Catch

    "The Catch" is documentary investigation that found Canada may be complicit in violating international law because the country’s navy and air force assists the U.S. Coast Guard to police international waters and capture suspected drug smugglers, some of whom have reported mistreatment on board U.S. Coast Guard vessels.
  • Aging aircraft and hidden threats

    While the Navy spent big over the past 20 years on experimental mine hunting technology that may never work, it stopped investing in its mine-hunting Sea Dragon helicopters, which have spent the better part of a year grounded due to mechanical problems after a series of deadly accidents. Now the service is trying to play catch-up. The Sea Dragon’s troubles are a symptom of a much larger problem: America’s military aircraft have been flown hard during 15 years of combat in the Middle East, and nearly all of their next-generation replacements are years behind schedule and millions over budget. The result: Much of the nation’s fleet is flying far longer than planned and in need of critical maintenance to keep them going. Their investigation found that the United State's Marine and Navy aircraft fleet has dismal readiness rates, as evidenced in an internal report obtained by the IRP and Virginian-Pilot. They examine what effect this has on our military's ability to counter the threat of sea mines.
  • Sea Dragon Down

    The NBC News Investigative Unit, the Virginian-Pilot newspaper, tand the UC Berkeley Investigative Reporting Program revealed that the U.S. Navy’s Sea Dragon helicopters had killed more than 30 service members since they were launched in the 1980s, with the fatality rate rising in recent years – and that the Navy was trying to cover up the danger. The exclusive reporting of all three news organizations of the Navy’s cover-up helped spur the grounding of the entire fleet of more than 150 helicopters for most of 2015.
  • Distress Signal

    A few months after a helicopter caught fire and crashed off the coast of Virginia in January 2014, killing 3 and wounding 2, the U.S. Navy announced that it had fixed the mechanical defect it in all of its MH-53E Sea Dragons. Our investigative reporting not only revealed that to be untrue, it had an immediate impact: It prompted top brass to ground an entire fleet of more than 170 helicopters for most of 2015.
  • Secrets of the SEALs

    The secretive and heralded Navy SEAL units, heroes of operations such as the killing of Osama bin Laden and now called upon more frequently to wage shadow wars, often operate with brutality and impunity, sometimes sabotaging the very missions they were sent to control.
  • Military Sexual Assaults

    The Baltimore Sun explored the little covered issue of sexual assault of men in the military, finding that justice is rarely sought in those cases even though statistics show that more men than women in the military are sexually assaulted each year.
  • Child Abuser

    When we got a call from a distraught family member telling us that a Navy officer had been found by a city agency to have sexually abused two of his children, but the Navy looked the other way, it seemed unlikely. When the family member told us that the officer's wife had been fined $5,000 and held in contempt of court for trying to call attention to the matter, we assumed the caller had to be mistaken. It took more than six months of reporting to nail down those troubling facts. In the meantime, the mother and children became homeless. Since the story ran, there has been an outpouring of money and a criminal investigation has been opened.
  • Made in Bangladesh

    Following two deadly factory disasters, Fault Lines traces Bangladesh’s garment supply chain to investigate whether U.S. retailers like Walmart and Gap know where their clothes are being made. In November 2012, a fire at the Tazreen Fashions factory in Bangladesh killed at least 112 people. Walmart’s Faded Glory brand shorts were among the clothing found in the charred remains. Walmart blamed its supplier, saying the order had been subcontracted to Tazreen without its authorization. But as Fault Lines follows the paper trail of the Faded Glory order, what some call an “open secret” is revealed: that corporations deliberately turn a blind eye to the practice of subcontracting. The owner of the factory at the center of the Faded Glory order describes how it ended up in Tazreen, and an insider explains how retailers cut corners to keeps prices low. To confirm the allegations, Fault Lines visits an unauthorized finishing house, where children as young as 12 are unexpectedly found working on Old Navy products.