Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Nazis" ...

  • Citizen 865: The Hunt for Hitler’s Hidden Soldiers in America

    Through insider accounts, Justice Department documents and research in four countries, Citizen 865 chronicles the setbacks, failures and great successes of a small team of federal prosecutors and historians that spent decades working to expose a brutal group of Nazi war criminals living in the United States. In 1990, in a basement archive in Prague, two American historians made a startling discovery: a Nazi roster from 1945 that no Western investigator had ever seen. The long-forgotten document, containing more than 700 names, helped unravel the details behind the most lethal killing operation in World War Two. In the tiny Polish village of Trawniki, the SS set up a school for mass murder and then recruited a roving army of foot soldiers, 5,000 men strong, to help annihilate the Jewish population of occupied Poland. More than 1.7 million Jews were murdered in fewer than 20 months, the span of two Polish summers. After the war, some of these men vanished, making their way to the U.S. and blending into communities across America. Though they participated in some of the most unspeakable crimes of the Holocaust, “Trawniki Men” spent years hiding in plain sight, their secrets intact. In a story spanning seven decades, Citizen 865 details the wartime journeys of two Jewish orphans from occupied Poland who outran the men of Trawniki and settled in the United States, only to learn that some of their one-time captors had followed. A team of prosecutors and historians pursued these men and, up against the forces of time and political opposition, battled to the present day to remove them from U.S. soil.
  • SWEDISH RADIO: The bombings, the Security Service and the Nazis

    In November 2016 and January 2017, three bombings are perpetrated in the Swedish city of Gothenburg. The attacks target newly arrived refugees and left-wing activists. One cleaner at a refugee centre is critically injured. The Security Service quickly identifies three local Nazis as those responsible. Later, when they are sentenced by the District Court, the investigation is introduced as a huge success. But when Swedish Radio starts looking into the police investigation, it turns out that the Security Service has had several opportunities to stop the bombings, that they had taken considerable risks in securing evidence, and that one of the bombs were planted right under the noses of the Security Service agents, without them intervening. The review resulted in massive criticism of the Security Service, from the police as well as from experts on terrorism. The review resulted in massive criticism of the Security Service, from the police as well as from experts on terrorism.
  • 48 Hours: In the Name of Hate

    The parents of Blaze Bernstein, a brilliant Ivy League student allegedly murdered because he was gay and Jewish, talk with 48 HOURS in their first prime-time interview about the loss of their son, the neo-Nazi hate group that may have fueled anger in his alleged killer, and what they’re doing to move forward. Tracy Smith sits down with Bernstein’s parents for “In The Name of Hate”
  • Mission Investigate: The Swedish Nazis

    In December 2013 36-year-old Fidel Ugo from Nigeria got stabbed in a Stockholm suburb by a group of Nazis, and he almost blead to death. The police investigation into the knife attack was soon discontinued and no one was charged for this obvious hate crime. When the reporters of SVT's current affairs magazine Mission Investigate starts scrutinizing the case they soon identify the perpetrators as members of a nazi organisation called The Swedish Resistance Movement (SMR). The reportage has been called the most important in Mission Investigate's history and gained enormous attention when aired in Sweden in April 2014. The police was heavily criticized for its shoddy investigation, but after the reportage was broadcast the case was reopened again. Three members of SMR are now suspected of attempted murder and they face up to 8 years in prison.
  • Nazi Past

    It was a sensational find by AP reporters David Rising and Randy Herschaft _ a suspected Nazi war criminal living in the United States, hiding in plain view for more than six decades. More than just a low ranking foot soldier, suspect Michael Karkoc was an officer who commanded a combat company responsible for civilian massacres, and a founding member of the SS-led Ukrainian Self Defense Legion _ and had never before come across authorities' radar. In an eight-month investigation with reporting in more than a half dozen countries and documents in five languages, the two were able to put together evidence so solid that it has led to criminal investigations in Poland and Germany, and not officially confirmed investigations in the United States and Ukraine, with Germany already recommending that prosecutors pursue murder charges against Karkoc. Rising and Herschaft were able to prove Karkoc lied to American officials when he immigrated to Minnesota in 1949, saying he never served in the military during the war _ which has been enough in similar cases for a Nazi war crimes suspect to be deported. But the investigation went much deeper, with the two uncovering details from eyewitnesses, wartime documents and Cold War-era archives firmly establishing not only that Karkoc's unit massacred civilians, but that he specifically gave the order to attack a village in which more than 40 men, women and children were gunned down and burned in their homes.
  • The Nazi and the Psychiatrist

    The Nazi and the Psychiatrist is a book of narrative journalism about a young U.S. Army psychiatrist, Douglas M. Kelley, who went to Nuremberg in 1945 to assess the sanity of the top Nazi leaders being held for trial. Kelley developed a close relationship with the highest-ranking German, Hermann Göring. The psychiatrist's findings greatly influenced his career and led him into a downward spiral that concluded with his suicide in 1958. The book explores the connection between Kelley's work and his suicide, and evaluates the significance of his psychiatric studies of the Nazis.
  • Unraveling the Mystery of the "Dead City"

    A painting by Egon Schiele titled "Dead City" belonged to Fritz Grunbaum and his wife before they died in the Holocaust. A quarter of a century later the struggle for recovering art raided by the Nazis still lasts as heirs try to reclaim the work.
  • From Russia with Hate

    Putzel traveled to Russia to "find the source of the viral videos" online that come from Russian neo-Nazis. In Russia immigrants are often attacked, and these videos posted on the Internet were being used to spread propaganda. While there, Putzel also went to a camp where Russian neo-Nazis "train for an anticipated uprising."
  • Hitler's Carmaker: GM and the Nazis

    Black attempts to prove veracity of an urban legend regarding GM's relationship with Germany. As the Nazi war machine gathered steam, General Motors was a major helper as the German military built its dominance. At the same time, GM was "perpetrating a massive criminal conspiracy to subvert clean, electric mass transit - trolleys - in 40 cities, thus helping our addiction to oil." GM had buried its past involvement with the Nazis by funding an academic inquiry, then keeping the results secret even after donating them to Yale University.
  • The Secret History of World War II

    A Boston Globe historical series provides an in-depth look into the intelligence machinations behind the World War II and the Cold War. The reporters reveal that Western Allies knew of Hitler's plans to systematically exterminate all of Europe's Jews several months earlier than previously thought; that US intelligence ran a covert operation to stall the creation of a Jewish state in the British colony of Palestine, fearing that such state would create generations of Islamic enmity; that American businesses were involved in commerce with the Nazis but also had espionage functions; and that the United States used 4,000 former German spies to spy on the Soviet Union. A major figure profiled in the series is a German Foreign Ministry official who had supplied the Americans with valuable inside documents but the CIA never really trusted him.