Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Pakistan" ...

  • FDA banned food

    The story mainly talks about famous food products that have been barred by US FDA for containing harmful substances being sold in Pakistani market.
  • The Sig Sauer affair

    In a series of articles Sueddeutsche Zeitung uncovered how Germany's oldest weapons manufacturer - Sig Sauer - illegally delivered weapons to Colombia, Brasil, Iraq, and assumingly Pakistan and India. After reporting these findings, Sig Sauer’s office was searched and the company was served a temporary export ban. In the weeks since, the investigators have also searched the offices of the overseeing holding company and the private homes of the two owners. Meanwhile a FCPA-investigation is running against Sig Sauer's sister company Sig Sauer Inc.
  • Pakistan's Bin Laden Dossier

    Pakistan’s Bin Laden Dossier is until now the most important publicly available official document about an event that ended an era - the killing of Osama Bin Laden—and it was not made released by any government or pursuant to a FOIA request. Al Jazeera obtained it through sensitive, on the ground sourcing in Pakistan, and through its Investigative Unit, exclusively published the 336-page file on July 8, 2013. The Bin Laden files detail how a man sought for over a decade, the leader of Al Qaeda, eluded both his American pursuers and the Pakistani government itself. The leaked report revealed dozens of new details, based on previously unseen testimony of 201 witnesses, including Bin Laden's wives, Pakistani intelligence leaders, senior ministers, bureaucrats and military, intelligence and security commanders.
  • Drones

    With U.S. officials disclosing scant details of drone strikes targeting suspected terrorists in Pakistan, Yemen and elsewhere, NBC News' Investigative Unit went to work to find out what the government wasn't telling us about the program. Over the course of the year, numerous reporters, producers and correspondents contributed to a thorough report that shed light on many different aspects of the program and broke news about the use of the remote-controlled aircraft..
  • Brian Ross Investigates: Al Qaeda in Kentucky

    This exclusive ABC News investigation found that American counterterrorism officials were investigating more than a dozen cases of possible terrorists who have slipped into the U.S. under the refugee program. With rare access inside current and ongoing major terrorism investigations, the in-depth investigative reports broadcast on "Nightline," "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Good Morning America" told the story of how a little noticed arrest of two men in Kentucky led to a major national security investigation that commanded the attention of top officials, including President Obama. The Iraqis were not refugees fleeing persecution, as they had claimed to immigration authorities, but were al Qaeda-iraq terrorists who had targeted U.S. troops in northern Iraq with bombs and sniper attacks. A key piece of evidence was that the fingerprints of one defendant were located on an improvised explosive device stored in a box for six years in an FBI warehouse, which had been found buried in a Baiji, Iraq road by American soldiers in September 2005. Worse, the two Iraqi insurgents, who had lied their way into the U.S. as alleged refugees -- and escaped drawing scrutiny until they were serttled in Kentucky -- were plotting to ship- heavy arms back to Iraq in an FBI sting, and were also discussing U.S. Homeland revenge bombings, the FBI learned. ABC News was able not only to tell the story of this incredible counterterrorism investigation by the FBI with help from the U.S. military, but also connect a specific bombing in Baiji that killed four Pennsylvania National Guardsmen to the Iraqi defendants. The exclusive ABC News investigation, which was broadcast on the network's three major newscasts as well as online with stories and web extra videos, also broke the news of current FBI counterterrorism investigations of suspects inside the U.S. whose fingerprints are being checked with those lifted from devices in evidence at the FBI's secret "bomb library," where ABC News was shown 100,000 IEDs collected from warzones in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere.
  • Explosion at West

    Tons of ammonium nitrate fertilizer at a central Texas plant exploded last April with the force of a small earthquake. The blast came just two days after the Boston Marathon and, in the national media, was overshadowed by events in the Northeast. While not the result of a terrorist attack, the explosion in West, Texas, was far larger and deadlier, and raised more significant public safety issues. In a series of investigative reports over eight months, The Dallas Morning News revealed that ammonium nitrate remains virtually unregulated by federal and state governments, despite its well-known explosive potential. (Timothy McVeigh used it in 1995 to blow up an Oklahoma City federal building.) Efforts to strengthen oversight have been blocked by industry lobbyists and government gridlock, The News found, even as the Pentagon sought bans on ammonium nitrate in Afghanistan and Pakistan. In pro-business, anti-regulation Texas, the federal government’s lax oversight meant no oversight at all. West Fertilizer Co. – scene of the disaster – violated almost every safety best practice. No state agency was charged with preventing an ammonium nitrate blast. There was no public registry of companies that handled the compound, even though many facilities are near homes and schools. Texas prohibits most counties from having fire codes and does not require facilities like West to obtain liability insurance. Gov. Rick Perry and other state politicians, who created this wide-open environment, washed their hands of the problem. They said West was a tragic accident that no amount of regulation could have prevented. The News’ findings, however, proved otherwise.
  • THE DRONE WAR

    In February Michael Isikoff broke the story that a confidential white paper from the Justice Department had detailed the legality of drone strikes on American citizens. Isikoff laid out a three-part test that would make targeted killings of Americans lawful. President Obama spoke directly to the contents of the Isikoff report weeks later in a major speech to the National Defense University, defending the drone program, but promising to be more transparent. In June, NBC Chief Foreign Correspondent Richard Engel took an in-depth look into the US drone program in Pakistan. Using a set of classified documents obtained by NBC that detailed more than one hundred drone strikes in the country between 2010 and 2011, Engel was able to show NBC’s viewers that the US doesn’t often know who they are killing, how many people they are killing, and whether or not civilians are a large unintended part of their targeting. In Part II of Engel’s report, he exclusively interviewed senior airman Brandon Bryant, a drone operator, speaking out for the first time about his work over the skies of Iraq and Afghanistan. Bryant brought Engel minute-by-minute through some of the strikes he controlled from 7500 miles away in New Mexico.
  • Al Qaeda in Kentucky

    This exclusive ABC News investigation found that American counterterrorism officials were investigating more than a dozen cases of possible terrorists who have slipped into the U.S. under the refugee program. With rare access inside current and ongoing major terrorism investigations, the in-depth investigative reports broadcast on "Nightline," "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Good Morning America" told the story of how a little noticed arrest of two men in Kentucky led to a major national security investigation that commanded the attention of top officials, including President Obama. The Iraqis were not refugees fleeing persecution, as they had claimed to immigration authorities, but were al Qaeda-iraq terrorists who had targeted U.S. troops in northern Iraq with bombs and sniper attacks. A key piece of evidence was that the fingerprints of one defendant were located on an improvised explosive device stored in a box for six years in an FBI warehouse, which had been found buried in a Baiji, Iraq road by American soldiers in September 2005. Worse, the two Iraqi insurgents, who had lied their way into the U.S. as alleged refugees -- and escaped drawing scrutiny until they were serttled in Kentucky -- were plotting to ship- heavy arms back to Iraq in an FBI sting, and were also discussing U.S. Homeland revenge bombings, the FBI learned. ABC News was able not only to tell the story of this incredible counterterrorism investigation by the FBI with help from the U.S. military, but also connect a specific bombing in Baiji that killed four Pennsylvania National Guardsmen to the Iraqi defendants. The exclusive ABC News investigation, which was broadcast on the network's three major newscasts as well as online with stories and web extra videos, also broke the news of current FBI counterterrorism investigations of suspects inside the U.S. whose fingerprints are being checked with those lifted from devices in evidence at the FBI's secret "bomb library," where ABC News was shown 100,000 IEDs collected from warzones in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere.
  • Terrorists in Love

    The book profiles six radical Muslim men from Pakistan, Afhganistan and Saudi Arabia and reveals their mystical dreams and visions, sexual repression and crumbling family structures.
  • Fallout: The True Story of the CIA's Secret War on Nuclear Trafficking

    Using confidential documents from government sources and dozens of interviews with key players, the authors revealed how for more than a quarter of a century, while the Central Intelligence Agency turned a dismissive eye, a globe-straddling network run by Pakistani scientist A. Q. Khan sold the equipment and expertise to make nuclear weapons to a rogues' gallery of nations.