Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Recruiting" ...

  • Teen to Terrorist

    KSTP's exclusive interview with a convicted terrorist who was a former ISIS recruit and one of the most high profile terrorist defendants in the federal government's most significant and largest terror recruiting case in the country gave them unprecedented insight into how and why ISIS is successfully recruiting young Somali-American men.
  • Ghost Schools

    In America’s long, bloody, and frustrating war in Afghanistan, the U.S. government has consistently trumpeted one major victory: education. More than a billion dollars was poured into building schools and educating Afghan children, in part to prevent the Taliban from recruiting a new generation of soldiers. But a BuzzFeed News investigation found those claims to be massively exaggerated, riddled with ghost schools, teachers, and students that exist only on paper.
  • Tucson ministry a cult, former followers say

    An investigation by Arizona Daily Star reporters Carol Ann Alaimo and Emily Bregel revealed that a local ministry, Faith Christian Church, had for decades been aggressively recruiting members on the University of Arizona’s campus, leaving in its wake a trail of traumatized former members who describe the church as a cult. Their stories — told independently over weeks of reporting — were remarkably similar. They included reports of hitting infants who exhibit a “rebellious spirit,” financial coercion, alienation from parents, public shaming of members and shunning of those who leave the church or question its leaders. After leaving, some say they spent years in therapy for panic attacks, depression, flashbacks and other symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • Black Arts

    This is an investigation of San Francisco's for-profit Academy of Art University, the country's largest private art school. I examine the questionable business model that produced a nearly billion-dollar fortune for its owners, the Stephens family. Meanwhile, the university produced abysmal graduation rates, high levels of student debt and poor job placement. Former employees alleged illegal compensation for high-pressure recruiting tactics. And the university had serious land-use violations on most of its 40-some prime properties, benefiting, critics say, from close ties to leading San Francisco politicians.
  • State of Terror

    In an unmatched examination of the Islamic State that began well before the attacks in Paris, The Times showed the secrets behind the group’s baffling resilience, tracking ISIS on battlefields in Syria, Libya and Iraq, and exposing its recruiting techniques, money trails and systematic policy of rape.
  • Unfair Game

    Texas high school athletics rules prohibit students from transferring from district to district for athletic purposes, but that hasn’t stopped coaches and administrators from openly flouting the rules to assemble state championship-caliber teams as part of an underground recruiting system that puts athletics over academics. WFAA investigative reporter Brett Shipp's reports showed how improper recruiting helped Dallas' Kimball Knights build back-to-back state champ basketball teams, and how former Dallas Cowboy Deion Sanders' new school, Prime Prep Academy, also drew in blue-chip players against the rules.
  • Unfair Game

    Texas high school athletics rules prohibit students from transferring from district to district for athletic purposes, but that hasn’t stopped coaches and administrators from openly flouting the rules to assemble state championship-caliber teams as part of an underground recruiting system that puts athletics over academics. WFAA investigative reporter Brett Shipp's reports showed how improper recruiting helped Dallas' Kimball Knights build back-to-back state champ basketball teams, and how former Dallas Cowboy Deion Sanders' new school, Prime Prep Academy, also drew in blue-chip players against the rules.
  • Fire Academy Diversity

    WBAL-TV exposed the fact that the Baltimore City Fire Department had abandoned its policy regarding recruitment designed to make the agency more diverse. The department has a history of overlooking minorities in recruiting and promotions. 63.2% of Bailtimore is African-American, but out of a 45 class of cadets, only 5 were African-American and 3 were women.
  • Colleges Use Cheap Loans to Lure Stars to Faculty

    “Although colleges and universities have often provided housing for officials to live on campuses, in recent years they have also begun to use low-interest or no-interest mortgage loans as a recruiting tool, sometimes from their own endowments”.
  • Go Army or Go to Jail

    The Commanding General over recruiting for the entire United States Army had made a promise to KHOU: the overly aggressive, even illegal tactics the station uncovered three years earlier would be corrected. The station believed him. Sadly, they discovered they were sorely mistaken. "Go Army or Go to Jail" is a follow-up story but it also broke new ground in the investigation. The investigators uncovered new and illegal tactics the Army uses to force unwilling teenagers to join its ranks and solve a new problem: the number of participants in something called the delayed entry program had dwindled to an all-time low. Some recruiters' solution? To bully, threatened and lie to teenagers and their families in hopes of making mission and meeting quota. Their findings spurred the station to search for and discover what some believe is the very root of Army recruiting abuses that have gone on for years. The investigation contends that the U.S. Army has, quite simply, ignored recommendation after recommendation from the investigative arm of Congress on how the Army could reform.