Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Robinson" ...

  • L.A. Times: Danger Spins From the Sky

    Robinson Helicopter Co., the world’s leading maker of civilian helicopters, is an American aviation success story – with a deadly 45-year history. The Los Angeles Times provided the first comprehensive examination of the company’s safety record, and the design features and flight characteristics that have dogged Robinson helicopters for decades.
  • CBS THIS MORNING: The Prison Release of David Robinson

    DAVID ROBINSON WALKED OUT OF A MISSOURI PRISON IN MAY, 2018 INTO THE WAITING ARMS OF HIS MOTHER AFTER SPENDING NEARLY TWO DECADES BEHIND BARS FOR A CRIME HE DID NOT COMMIT. WHILE THE OCCASION WAS CAUSE FOR CELEBRATION, OUR COVERAGE WAS DESIGNED TO INFORM AUDIENCES OF THE HIGHLY UNUSUAL PATH ROBINSON’S LAWYERS TOOK TO PROVE HIS INNOCENCE. OUR COVERAGE WAS ALSO CREDITED WITH THE NEEDED ADDED IMPETUS TO LEAD TO A TIMELY RELEASE.
  • Alabama Media Group: Dirty Business

    In 2017, federal prosecutors charged Balch & Bingham lawyer Joel Gilbert and Drummond vice president David Roberson with bribing state Rep. Oliver Robinson to help them fight the EPA. However, as Whitmire revealed, their astroturfing scheme went much further, involving public officials from a school superintendent to U.S. senators. When Whitmire requested records from the Alabama Attorney General's Office showing Luther Strange's role in the scheme, the office denied those records existed. Whitmire proved, not once but twice, that officials there were lying, and that Strange had put his name on Gilbert's work product to persuade the EPA not to help poor residents in north Birmingham clean their soil of toxins. Further, Whitmire showed a small local school district had agreed to help resist the EPA, too, denying EPA access to test schoolyards for toxins.
  • Prosecutorial misconduct - the vindictive reign of Mark Lindquist

    Throughout 2015, in more than 50 news stories and editorials, The News Tribune chronicled the saga of Pierce County prosecutor Mark Lindquist, the county's most powerful lawyer. Lindquist, elected as a minister of justice, sees himself as a politician first. Justice matters less to him. He aspires to higher office and pop-culture stardom. The News Tribune's stories included deep investigations, breaking coverage and editorials, all describing Lindquist's efforts to consolidate political power and evade accountability despite multiple adverse legal findings, investigations and accusations of legal misconduct.
  • Embassy Construction

    For this story, Nancy Cordes and the producers working with her took a much closer look at the State Department’s new “Design Excellence” initiative for embassy construction and found it had some serious problems. The new embassy in London, nicknamed ‘The Cube’ that is currently under construction is $100 million over the original cost estimate. CBS found its glass was problematic to say the least. We broke the news that the thick glass for the building is acquired in Germany, shipped to Connecticut and then shipped back to London for construction. Critics told us they are concerned that the State Department is sacrificing safety and cost to make new embassies “pretty”. Our story looked at other embassies as well including a new building in Papua New Guinea where the cost has ballooned from $50 million to $211 million. In light of the terrorist attack in Benghazi, an independent review of embassy construction by former State Department officials found that delays in “design excellence” embassies meant that State Department employees were in harm’s way for longer periods of time.
  • The Case of Four Little Words

    TNT’s story uncovered a bungled prosecution based on demonstrably false facts, and subsequent attempts to conceal prosecutorial errors from the defense and the courts over a four-year span. The defendant sued for false arrest and sought disclosure of relevant records. Prosecutors tried to prevent that disclosure and failed. A sheriff’s deputy sought to disclose information revealing the same missteps; prosecutors tried to prevent it, and failed. Subsequently, they tried to label the deputy as a dishonest cop. The deputy resisted; prosecutors sought to silence him with a barrage of legal fees. They failed. The story exposed the scorched-earth tactics of prosecutors bent on winning by any means necessary, even if it meant discrediting a law enforcement officer who told the truth. Intertwined cases are still active, tied to multiple appeals in higher courts; prosecutors continue to lose those arguments.
  • New egg safety plan shows cracks in the system

    It’s been almost three years since more than 500 million eggs were recalled in 2010 because of an outbreak of Salmonella that caused nearly 2,000 illnesses - the largest outbreak of its kind on record. Yet under a new egg safety plan approved shortly before the recall, all egg production facilities are still not inspected as required by the plan.
  • WestNet

    An investigation of West Sound Narcotics Enforcement Team (WestNet), a drug-enforcement task force based in Kitsap County, Washington with a history of sloppy busts and screwed-up cases.
  • "Washam's Law"

    In this investigative report, reporter Sean Robinson took a hard look at the personal and political life of Dale Washam, elected to Pierce Country Assessor-Treasurer to the "surprise" of many in 2008. Serving as Pierce Country Assessor-Treasurer for two years, Washam has been called a "gadfly" and a "busybody." This series of stories "exposed Washam as a fraud" who was only interested in his own "crusade."
  • The Stolen Child

    This is a story of the disappearance of Misty Copsey; currently it remains a cold-case left unsolved. A fall afternoon in 1992, the day Misty never came home from the county fair. This series sheds “new light on an investigation plagued by police blunders”. It also “uncovered the malignant impact of an intrusive bystander’s obsession and exposed the foibles of small-town cops whose missteps and misstatements went unchallenged for two decades”.