Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "SLIP" ...

  • In the Dark

    “In the Dark” was a narrative investigative series, providing the anatomy of the faulty police investigation into the 1994 slayings of a young mother and her toddler son, Stacy Falcon Dewey and Jacob Dewey. The investigation allowed the truth to slip through the cracks despite DNA evidence that had linked a convicted murderer to the crime scene. The story uncovered emails and other records that showed how neglect and indifference by forensics examiners and prosecutors delayed the case, leaving the victims’ unwitting family to suffer for years without answers.
  • The Center for Public Integrity: Tax Breaks: The Favored Few

    In February 2018, Congress passed a massive budget bill, and President Donald Trump signed it. It provided new money for the military. It funded disaster relief efforts. And it raised the nation’s “debt ceiling” — allowing the government to secure new loans. While these provisions grabbed headlines amid the chaos of what was, at best, a slapdash scramble to pass a budget and avert another government shutdown, a gaggle of goodies, benefiting a bevy of special interests, slipped into the bill’s 652 pages almost unnoticed. These goodies are called “tax extenders.” Seeing an opportunity to boldly tell an effectively untold tale, the staff of the Center for Public Integrity endeavored to explain how every tax extender — more than 30 in all — came to fruition and reveal how lobbyists gamed the political system and squeezed $16 billion worth of special favors from it. This project represented a rare example of deep investigative reporting on Congress. While hundred of reporters cover what Mitch MCConnell and Nancy Pelosi said yesterday, very few unravel how the institution of Congress is corrupted.
  • RED CARD: How the U.S. Blew the Whistle on the World's Biggest Sports Scandal

    Red Card tells the definitive, shocking account of the FIFA scandal—the biggest international corruption case of recent years, spearheaded by US investigators, involving dozens of countries, and implicating nearly every aspect of the world’s most popular sport, soccer, including its biggest event, the World Cup. The book revealed the origins of the investigation, its ties to Christopher Steele and the Trump/Russia Dossier, untold workings of the DoJ, IRS, and FBI, and how some of the most corrupt soccer officials in the world slipped through the government’s fingers.
  • Under The Radar

    In an exhaustive, unprecedented review of more than 1,300 military court martial cases the Scripps Washington Bureau discovered at least 242 convicted military rapists, child molesters, and other sex offenders have fallen under the radar and slipped through what a member of the House Armed Services Committee calls a “gaping loophole” in the system. Scripps discovered some military sex offenders go on to re-offend in heinous ways on unsuspecting victims in the civilian world.
  • Tragedy on the Water

    A 20-year-old Iowa man died on May 31, 2014, while in the custody of a Missouri Highway Patrol trooper on the Lake of the Ozarks. Brandon Ellingson, stopped for suspicion of boating while intoxicated, was being transported to a patrol zone office when he fell – or, as the patrol initially said, jumped – from the trooper’s boat. His wrists were locked in handcuffs behind his back, and the life vest the trooper had placed over his head soon came off. Ellingson struggled to keep his head above water for several minutes before slipping to the bottom of the lake. Subsequent reporting revealed a series of mistakes by the trooper, a road veteran who had not received proper training to work the water after the Missouri Water Patrol was merged into the Highway Patrol in 2011.
  • Under The Radar: A Scripps Washington Bureau Investigation of Military Sex Offenders After They Leave The Brig

    Under The Radar: A Scripps Washington Bureau Investigation In an exhaustive, unprecedented review of more than 1,300 military court martial cases the Scripps Washington Bureau discovered at least 242 convicted military rapists, child molesters, and other sex offenders have fallen under the radar and slipped through what a member of the House Armed Services Committee calls a “gaping loophole” in the system. Scripps discovered some military sex offenders go on to re-offend in heinous ways on unsuspecting victims in the civilian world. The Scripps investigation, “Under The Radar” has triggered action at the national, state and local level after exposing several major problems when convicted military sex offenders are returned to civilian life.
  • Fatal Leak

    After four DuPont workers were killed in a plant accident in La Porte, the Chronicle put its investigative team in charge of the follow-up. The reporters quickly discovered that the company failed to respond properly to the accident and had put its workers at risk by not providing necessary safety equipment. Further investigation revealed another DuPont worker's brush with death and illustrated how DuPont's safety record had slipped in recent years.
  • The Business of Dying

    Today, about half of older Americans receive hospice care before dying, and many consider it a godsend. But since hospices were launched in the ‘70s by pioneering community groups, for-profit companies have surged into the $17 billion field, and quality has slipped. For-profit hospices spend less on nursing and are less likely to offer critical care to patients. Government inspections, scheduled every six years, failed to ensure care for some of the nation’s frailest people. Tens of thousands of patients, most of them elderly and frail, were dying without seeing a nurse in their last days.
  • farm Injuries

    We all need to eat. Our lives depend upon it. Yet, each day hundreds of thousands of farmers put their own lives at risk for our sustenance. One slip and their lives can be changed forever - or worse. The Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism and The Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting took a collaborative look at farm injuries in the top two corn-producing states in the country.
  • Brian Ross Investigates: Al Qaeda in Kentucky

    This exclusive ABC News investigation found that American counterterrorism officials were investigating more than a dozen cases of possible terrorists who have slipped into the U.S. under the refugee program. With rare access inside current and ongoing major terrorism investigations, the in-depth investigative reports broadcast on "Nightline," "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Good Morning America" told the story of how a little noticed arrest of two men in Kentucky led to a major national security investigation that commanded the attention of top officials, including President Obama. The Iraqis were not refugees fleeing persecution, as they had claimed to immigration authorities, but were al Qaeda-iraq terrorists who had targeted U.S. troops in northern Iraq with bombs and sniper attacks. A key piece of evidence was that the fingerprints of one defendant were located on an improvised explosive device stored in a box for six years in an FBI warehouse, which had been found buried in a Baiji, Iraq road by American soldiers in September 2005. Worse, the two Iraqi insurgents, who had lied their way into the U.S. as alleged refugees -- and escaped drawing scrutiny until they were serttled in Kentucky -- were plotting to ship- heavy arms back to Iraq in an FBI sting, and were also discussing U.S. Homeland revenge bombings, the FBI learned. ABC News was able not only to tell the story of this incredible counterterrorism investigation by the FBI with help from the U.S. military, but also connect a specific bombing in Baiji that killed four Pennsylvania National Guardsmen to the Iraqi defendants. The exclusive ABC News investigation, which was broadcast on the network's three major newscasts as well as online with stories and web extra videos, also broke the news of current FBI counterterrorism investigations of suspects inside the U.S. whose fingerprints are being checked with those lifted from devices in evidence at the FBI's secret "bomb library," where ABC News was shown 100,000 IEDs collected from warzones in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere.