Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Sacramento" ...

  • ABC10: GSK

    I created a StoryMap of all the Golden State Killer's alleged crimes using both existing maps/data from the FBI and the Sacramento County District Attorney's Office, as well as locations from a local author chronicling the Golden State Killer. Moreover, I edited/produced the TV piece explaining the map.
  • CALmatters: California’s for-profit college watchdog fails to police as feds back down

    The California agency responsible for overseeing the state’s 1,000-plus for-profit colleges and vocational schools has repeatedly failed or been slow to enforce laws meant to prevent fraud and abuse, leaving a serious gap in accountability as federal regulators back away from the job.
  • Flushing Money

    The story details how California’s capital city, Sacramento, has delayed the mandated installation of water meters by more than a decade by adding on hundreds of millions of dollars of unnecessary, wasteful, often dangerous construction.
  • The Surveillance State of California

    The investigation centered around our discovery that at least seven California law enforcement agencies were using controversial high-tech cell phone tracking technology without the public's knowledge and no judicial oversight. They uncovered police from San Diego to Sacramento have been using fake cell towers, known as "Stingrays", for years and in complete secret. In fact, Sacramento judges and prosecutors had no idea the technology was being used until we approached them about the story. Grant applications obtained during our investigation showed law enforcement agencies used terrorism as the justification for purchasing Stingray technology, when in reality they were using the device for people suspected of far more routine crimes, including drugs and robberies.
  • At Your Discretion: KCRA Investigates City Spending

    What if you were given permission to spend money however you wanted with little oversight? A KCRA investigation found that Sacramento's city council and mayor were given permission to do just that to the tune of millions of dollars through their elected terms. KCRA asked under the Public Records Act for discretionary spending accounts for the city of Sacramento's leaders. What we found instead was that the council and mayor have no line item budgeting. Instead they are given hundreds of thousands of dollars a year to spend on whatever they want, from personnel to face painting in the park.
  • Sponsored Bills in Sacramento: How Our Laws are Really Made

    The series takes an in-depth look at how many bills in the state legislature are written by outside sponsors and their lobbyists. It examines the connection between lawmakers who introduce these bills and the campaign contributions they receive from the groups that sponsored the bills.
  • Self Dealing and Double Dipping in the California National Guard

    When the U.S. government decided to boost incentives for National Guard service and combat veterans, no one envisioned a system in which a single bureaucrat could approve tens of millions of payments to officers and others who probably weren't eligible. Yet these and other apparent abuses occurred in California's National Guard even after flags were raised, and they gained top-level attention only after Sacramento Bee reporter Charles Piller revealed them. As Piller reported, up to $100 million in potentially illegal or improper incentive payments were made to service members, including Guard captains and majors who knew they were ineligible for disbursements.
  • Bird strike rates at U.S. Airports

    Airplanes landing and taking off at airports in Sacramento, Kansas City, and Denver have been the most liekly in the nation to hit birds , according to an NPR analysis of new data from the Federal Aviation Administration. Wildlife researchers believe they can alert birds to oncoming planes if they can come up with an appropriate visual signal, such as pulsating LED lights currently being tested.
  • Unprotected: An Investigation o Sacramento County's Child Protective Services

    A dozen years after the 1996 torture-death of one boy triggered major reforms within Sacramento County's Child Protective Services, -- and resulted in a quadrupling of the agency's budget and doubling of its staff -- many of the same problems persist in 2008. The Sacramento Bee found that, despite the massive increase in resources, numerous children continue to be injured or killed who had prior involvement with Sacramento's CPS. Among the problems detailed by The Bee: inadequate supervision and training, sloppy investigations, poor evaluation of children's risk, lack of accountability for serious mistakes. In its follow-up stories, which prompted a grand jury investigation, The Bee used a new state law related to child deaths to push CPS to release case files and found it had illegally altered the records of one boy who died in their care.
  • Behind the Meltdown

    The foreclosure crisis in the Sacramento Bee's coverage area impacted more than 8,000 homes. Among the Bee's findings were that while the area's median income was about $80,000, home loan "stated income" applications indicated reported figures closer to $100,000, which were not verified before a loan was disbursed. As a result of the risky loans, many home buyers' credit ratings took a major hit, while homes dropped in value and the market was flooded with people attempting to sell. With so many vacant homes, squatters have become a problem in neighborhoods like North Sacramento's Western Avenue, which the Bee identifies as perhaps the area hardest hit by the crisis.