Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Salmonell" ...

  • The Trouble with Chicken

    FRONTLINE investigates the spread of dangerous pathogens in our meat -- particularly poultry -- and why the food-safety system isn't stopping the threat. Focusing on an outbreak of Salmonella Heidelberg at one of the nation's largest poultry processors, the documentary reveals how contaminants are evading regulators and causing more severe illnesses at a time when Americans are consuming more chicken than ever. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/trouble-with-chicken/transcript/
  • A Game of Chicken

    Over the course of a decade, the U.S. Department of Agriculture had not one, not two, not three, but four opportunities to warn the public about salmonella outbreaks involving Foster Farms chicken. Each time, they hemmed and hawed, worrying more about the threat of legal action from a corporate giant than about protecting consumers. Health reporter Lynne Terry was the first journalist in America to identify and write about this alarming trend. With reporters from Frontline, The Center for Investigative Reporting and the New York Times circling around the story, she beat them all with a stunning and illuminating examination of the failures of the USDA. In her year-long investigation, Terry set out to determine if the USDA’s notoriously slow handling of a major salmonella outbreak in 2013-2014 was an isolated case. It wasn’t. She reviewed thousands of pages of previously undisclosed documents dating back to 2003. What she found was disturbing: More than 1,000 people had rushed to their doctors with bouts of food poisoning. They had no idea what made them sick. But federal regulators did. Those same federal officials took virtually no steps to protect consumers from bad chicken. Health officials in Oregon and Washington had pushed vigorously for federal action, having identified clear and convincing evidence of problems. But the USDA wouldn’t budge. Terry’s meticulous reporting identified these themes: •USDA officials are afraid of lawsuits. The agency is so worried about being sued by companies that they’ve set an almost impossible bar for evidence, even rejecting samples of tainted chicken that state health agencies believed would help clinch their case. •Government inspectors are pressured to go easy on food processors. In one notable case, the USDA transferred an inspector after Foster Farms complained he wrote too many citations. •The USDA succumbed to further pressure from Foster Farms. After strong pushback from the company’s lawyers, the agency backed away from citing an unequivocal connection linking the company to a 2004 outbreak – even though the evidence pointed only to Foster Farms.
  • New egg safety plan shows cracks in the system

    It’s been almost three years since more than 500 million eggs were recalled in 2010 because of an outbreak of Salmonella that caused nearly 2,000 illnesses - the largest outbreak of its kind on record. Yet under a new egg safety plan approved shortly before the recall, all egg production facilities are still not inspected as required by the plan.
  • Anatomy of a Recall

    The series had its origin in a recall announcement. Ground beef sold by Maine-based Hannaford Foods had been linked to a salmonella outbreak that sickened 14 people in seven states. On Dec. 15, the grocery chain announced the recall of all its in-store ground beef with a sell-by date of Dec. 17 or earlier. When officials stonewalled on basic questions, our reporters worked with dozens of sources, including food safety experts, former USDA employees, butchers, agriculture academics and the outbreak victims themselves to demonstrate how this one outbreak, the latest of scores of similar outbreaks nationwide, was a result of federal regulators and local retailers knowingly ignoring best practices that could have prevented the outbreak in the first place, or allowed investigators to trace the source of the salmonella contamination.
  • McDonald's Eggs

    A story exposing major health concerns at a major American egg farm supplying large retailers such as McDonald's and Target with eggs.
  • Flawed State Reporting Laws Leaves Consumers Vulnerable

    The article explores the impact of America's fragmented outbreak response system, in which no states have the same foodborne illness reporting requirement.
  • Food and Supplement Safety

    "Consumer Reports used its extensive testing and investigative resources to shine the light of foods, drugs and supplements consumed by tens of millions of Americans that account for significant safety risks, yet which consumers and government officials knew little about."
  • Recipe for Trouble

    This investigation brings to light the flaws in Pennsylvania's health inspection agencies. The reporters found major inconsistencies with how inspectors rated restaurants, determined that some restaurants had not been inspected in years, and found that the lax rules sometimes lead to repeat violations. The investigation includes a sidebar on food-borne illnesses, and a story on the effort it took to acquire and organize the data.
  • Dr. Death and His Accomplice

    CBS News 60 Minutes tells the story of Dr. Larry Ford, a gynecologist who hired a hitman to kill his business partner and committed suicide after police connected him to the attempted hit. "When police went to search Dr. Ford's home in Irvine, CA, they found guns and explosives buried in his backyard and a cache of biological agents -- including botulism, salmonella, cholera and typhoid -- in his refrigerator. Police found evidence that Dr. Ford had allegedly poisoned women with some of his germs or chemicals, and (60 Minutes) discovered that a number of female acquaintances of his had long-term debilitating symptoms which rendered them legally disabled. Tips poured in to local police that Dr. Ford had military and intelligence connections, and that he had worked for South Africa's apartheid-era bio-warfare program. (60 Minutes) discovered strong evidence linking Dr. Ford to the leader of the South African program, Dr. Wouter Basson, who has been dubbed 'Dr. Death' by the African press, for his mandate to kill blacks and other opponents of the white-ruled government."
  • Modern Meat

    Frontline investigates health hazards posed by the nation's meat industry. The story points to evidence that the "widespread use of antibiotics to promote growth and keep livestock healthy may result in the development of bacterial strains that are resistant to antibiotic treatment." The investigation started with examining a lawsuit that a Texas meat-grinding company, Supreme Beef -- after failing federal salmonella standard tests three times -- filed against the U.S. Department of Agriculture.