Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Serbia" ...

  • Serbian Government Assets Revealed

    KRIK decided to focus on revealing corruption and crime at the highest levels of power. In late 2015 our team of journalists started to expose the hidden assets of Serbian politicians, as well as their relationship networks and potential wrongdoing. Our first discovery in this field was that Sinisa Mali, the Mayor of Belgrade, has secretly bought 24 resort apartments on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast through offshore companies from British Virgin Islands. This story has attracted huge attention from the Serbian public and it was picked up in all Serbian media. That inspired us to continue to investigate the mayor’s business deals in 2016 but also expand our investigation on other political elites. This one year investigation resulted in publishing a complete database of assets and businesses of all ministers from the new Serbian government in December 2016. https://imovinapoliticara.krik.rs/display/
  • Man in the Middle

    Reporters investigating the network of accused drug kingpin Darko Saric kept stumbling on an obscure cigarette smuggler with money and connections far beyond his apparent importance.
  • Saric

    The book "Saric" follows the rise of the Balkan narco-cartel and details its drug smuggling, money laundering, and corruption of politicians and businesses. The year 2004 was a breakthrough for Balkan organized crime. After Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Đinđić was assassinated in 2003, police dismantled most of crime groups in the country. Big criminals understood that to keep operating they had to change and operate smarter. They did. They formed a syndicate, they stoped selling drugs inside the country and they moved into European markets. Through their new cartel they earned billions and have used it to buy political parties, police and control over the economies of Serbia, Montenegro and other countries.
  • Toncev's Mafia Ties

    Ivica Toncev appeared out of nowhere and became a major figure in Serbian government. He became the right hand man of Serbian Prime Minister and Minister of Police Ivica Dacic, who had made his name through high profile arrests of crime figures. But the powerful national security adviser was not who he seemed. In fact, he had long-time friendships and was as an ongoing business partner with some of the most ruthless organized crime figures in the Balkans. OCCRP also proved that the Prime Minister was warned of these connections early on but chose not to act. The story raised serious questions about the leading political party in Serbia and its ties to organized crime.
  • The Forgotten

    This story is an inside look at the systematic warehousing of more than 17,000 adults and children in Serbia's mental institutions. Dateline NBC gained unprecedented access to remote, government-run facilities and found alarming and sometimes life-threatening conditions. The institutions are remnants of Serbia's communist past and symbols of a deeply ingrained prejudice against the mentally disabled and their families. Serbia's medical establishment continues to advise parents to put their mentally disabled newborns into institutions, and the government provides virtually no support for those who choose not to. In mental institutions throughout Serbia, Dateline found adults and children crammed into fetid rooms and metal cribs, their bodies emaciated, atrophied and disfigured. Some residents appeared to be children but they were actually young adults whose growth had been stunted by years of institutionalization. One of our most disturbing discoveries came while staying overnight in a dangerously overcrowded institution. There we learned that children are routinely tied to their bed railings for long periods of time - a practice that one disability rights organization says meets the legal definition of torture under international law.
  • Slavery of the Brothel

    An extensive account of the growing sex slave trade in the Balkans -- particularly Kosovo. "A virulent Mafia business is thriving in postwar Kosovo: the $7 to $12 billion traffic in Eastern European women lured by promises of work, then forced into prostitution. Despite international efforts, sex slave traders have been nearly impossible to prosecute, thanks to corruption, local laws, and the victims' fear of testifying. Tracing the path of one young Moldovan woman, Sebastian Junger conducts his own investigation of a vicious cycle that traps as many as 200,000 women a year."
  • Burning the evidence

    Minnesota Public Radio investigates the incineration of the remains of thousands of ethnic Albanians by Serbian forces under the command of Slobodan Milosevic during the 1999 war in Kosovo. The secret operation was part of a highly-organized effort by Serbia's leadership to conceal evidence of possible war crimes from international investigators. Documentation shows that the operation was carried out by an elite unit of the Serbian security service.
  • The Master Swindler of Yugoslavia

    ARTnews reports on artworks looted from Holocaust victims by the Nazis. Many of the pieces ended up in Yugoslavia, after a "Yugoslav art thief forger and probable spy Ante Topic Mimara ... tricked American art restitution officers into turning over 166 artworks to him in 1949 by falsely claiming that the Nazis had stolen them from Yugoslavia." The duped Americans later searched for the artworks, never found them and covered up the incident, the story reveals. ARTnews has located some the pieces in museums in Serbia and Croatia. The investigation includes photographs of the artworks.
  • Peace Is Hell

    "Every six month the Pentagon sends nearly 4,000 soldiers to Bosnia and brings nearly 4,000 soldiers home. To see how it's done is to understand why keeping peace has become harder than waging war - and why the Pax Americana has stretched the mighty American military to the limit," reports the Atlantic Monthly. The story details the everyday life, preparation and responsibilities of the Amerian troops in Bosnia, and sheds light on their training and equipment. The article finds that the Bosnian mission requires "all of the subtlety, patience and personal wariness that operating in international coalitions and ambiguous civilian environments entails."
  • Revealed: the Cruel Fate of War's Rape Babies

    "This story exposes the drama of the thousands of Kosovar Albanian women who were raped by Serbian forces in the run-up to the 1999 NATO bombing campaign - women whose plight had otherwise been ignored by the international community." The correspondent reveals that "up to 20,000 women were raped during the Kosovan carnage." "The story reveals how taboo not only brought social stigma on the women, but ultimately caused international organisations to cover-up the crimes as well." It also "describes ...how rape-babies came to be abandoned across Kosovo."