Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Somalia" ...

  • The Drone Papers

    The Intercept obtained a cache of secret documents detailing the inner workings of the U.S. military’s assassination program in Afghanistan, Yemen, and Somalia. The documents, provided by a whistleblower within the intelligence community who worked on the drone program, offer an unprecedented glimpse into the U.S. military’s kill/capture operations during a key time in the evolution of the drone wars. After six months of reporting by a team of seven, The Intercept published The Drone Papers, a multimedia package of eight articles that revealed a deeply conflicted U.S. military and intelligence community secretly driving a program that kills far more people than the intended targets, causing serious harm to U.S. moral standing and national security. https://theintercept.com/drone-papers/
  • Nation Institute (TomDispatch and The Intercept) coverage of the U.S. Military in Africa

    I wrote an untitled collection of articles for The Nation Institute’s TomDispatch.com and First Look Media’s The Intercept investigating the U.S. military’s extensive and largely secret operations on the African continent. Utilizing documents obtained via the Freedom of Information Act and from a whistle blower as well as a plethora of open source material, I offered a rare glimpse of the actions of a very secretive military command. Along the way, I revealed covert U.S. drone bases used for targeted killing campaigns from Yemen and Somalia to Iraq and Syria; I exposed unreported drug use and criminal behavior by U.S. forces across Africa; and shined a light on a multitude of missions in which elite U.S. forces trained alongside members of African armies regularly cited by the State Department for human rights abuses; among many other revelations. (While The Intercept may not fit the definition of a small outlet, I generally work alone and receive only spare support beyond editing. And TomDispatch is a truly tiny outlet.) https://theintercept.com/drone-papers/target-africa/ https://theintercept.com/2015/10/21/stealth-expansion-of-secret-us-drone-base-in-africa/ https://theintercept.com/2016/02/10/where-to-invade-next-is-the-most-subversive-movie-michael-moore-has-ever-made/
  • Brian Ross Investigates: Al Qaeda in Kentucky

    This exclusive ABC News investigation found that American counterterrorism officials were investigating more than a dozen cases of possible terrorists who have slipped into the U.S. under the refugee program. With rare access inside current and ongoing major terrorism investigations, the in-depth investigative reports broadcast on "Nightline," "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Good Morning America" told the story of how a little noticed arrest of two men in Kentucky led to a major national security investigation that commanded the attention of top officials, including President Obama. The Iraqis were not refugees fleeing persecution, as they had claimed to immigration authorities, but were al Qaeda-iraq terrorists who had targeted U.S. troops in northern Iraq with bombs and sniper attacks. A key piece of evidence was that the fingerprints of one defendant were located on an improvised explosive device stored in a box for six years in an FBI warehouse, which had been found buried in a Baiji, Iraq road by American soldiers in September 2005. Worse, the two Iraqi insurgents, who had lied their way into the U.S. as alleged refugees -- and escaped drawing scrutiny until they were serttled in Kentucky -- were plotting to ship- heavy arms back to Iraq in an FBI sting, and were also discussing U.S. Homeland revenge bombings, the FBI learned. ABC News was able not only to tell the story of this incredible counterterrorism investigation by the FBI with help from the U.S. military, but also connect a specific bombing in Baiji that killed four Pennsylvania National Guardsmen to the Iraqi defendants. The exclusive ABC News investigation, which was broadcast on the network's three major newscasts as well as online with stories and web extra videos, also broke the news of current FBI counterterrorism investigations of suspects inside the U.S. whose fingerprints are being checked with those lifted from devices in evidence at the FBI's secret "bomb library," where ABC News was shown 100,000 IEDs collected from warzones in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere.
  • Al Qaeda in Kentucky

    This exclusive ABC News investigation found that American counterterrorism officials were investigating more than a dozen cases of possible terrorists who have slipped into the U.S. under the refugee program. With rare access inside current and ongoing major terrorism investigations, the in-depth investigative reports broadcast on "Nightline," "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Good Morning America" told the story of how a little noticed arrest of two men in Kentucky led to a major national security investigation that commanded the attention of top officials, including President Obama. The Iraqis were not refugees fleeing persecution, as they had claimed to immigration authorities, but were al Qaeda-iraq terrorists who had targeted U.S. troops in northern Iraq with bombs and sniper attacks. A key piece of evidence was that the fingerprints of one defendant were located on an improvised explosive device stored in a box for six years in an FBI warehouse, which had been found buried in a Baiji, Iraq road by American soldiers in September 2005. Worse, the two Iraqi insurgents, who had lied their way into the U.S. as alleged refugees -- and escaped drawing scrutiny until they were serttled in Kentucky -- were plotting to ship- heavy arms back to Iraq in an FBI sting, and were also discussing U.S. Homeland revenge bombings, the FBI learned. ABC News was able not only to tell the story of this incredible counterterrorism investigation by the FBI with help from the U.S. military, but also connect a specific bombing in Baiji that killed four Pennsylvania National Guardsmen to the Iraqi defendants. The exclusive ABC News investigation, which was broadcast on the network's three major newscasts as well as online with stories and web extra videos, also broke the news of current FBI counterterrorism investigations of suspects inside the U.S. whose fingerprints are being checked with those lifted from devices in evidence at the FBI's secret "bomb library," where ABC News was shown 100,000 IEDs collected from warzones in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere.
  • Shell Games Series

    As he sought out the presidency in 2008, Barack Obama called for greater corporate transparency around the world. His criticism focused on the forgiving laws of locales outside U.S. borders- from Switzerland to the Cayman Islands. In a multi-part series called "Shell Games", Reuters revealed equally egregious practices on America'a own shores, where business incorporation laws in some states are more lax than those of Somalia.
  • Masters of chaos: The secret history of the special forces

    This book recounts the Special Forces missions over the past 15 years, including Desert Storm, Just Cause, Somalia, the Balkans, Afghanistan and Iraq. It is based on interviews with soldiers of all ranks, access bestowed upon a reporter with 10 years of experience covering insurgencies in Latin America.
  • Welcome Back Warrior

    The tragic suicide of mentally ill Marine Corps veteran Brian Callan was the catalyst for an analysis of how the Department of Veterans Affairs fails to assist soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and a variation called peacekeeper's traumatic stress disorder. The VA has cut special services for those with PTSD, like Callan who served in Lebanon, Desert Storm and Somalia, nearly to extinction,
  • Gunrunners

    This Web site was done jointly with a PBS Frontline/Word episode, "Gunrunners," which examined the "secret activities of international gun smugglers and the efforts of United Nations investigators to track and stop this trafficking," according to the contest questionnaire.
  • Bystanders to Genocide

    The Atlantic Monthly investigates "why the United states let the Rwandan tragedy happen." The story includes "exclusive interviews with scores of the participants in the decision-making." The author analyses "a cache of newly declassified documents" that reveal that "the U.S. government knew enough about the genocide early on to save lives..." The story reveals that "the U.S. did much more than fail to send troops...it lead a successful effort to remove most of the UN peacekeepers who were already in Rwanda." The article is a "chilling narrative of self-serving caution and flaccid will - and countless missed opportunities to mitigate a colossal crime."
  • Out of Africa

    Education Week reports on the increase of African refugees who are moving to Columbus, Ohio and the challenges of teaching students with little or no previous education. "While Somalis at the elementary level participate in regular ESL programs, older Somali children can attend one of two 'welcome centers' at the middle and high school levels before entering a regular ESL program." Students in the Welcome Centers "may interact with native-born American students at lunch or during electives . . . all of the core academic classes are self-contained. . . Students are further divided into six levels according to their literacy skills . . . Their central philosophy is that immigrant students should be placed in a transitional, self-contained program for a short time to learn ESL and academic content before attending regular schools." This article reports on the benefits of these programs, but also raises the concerns of Somali community organizations who disagree.