Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Tutsi" ...

  • Justice on the Grass

    Temple-Raston investigates the events leading to the genocide in Rwanda in 1994, and how Rwanda has fared in the aftermath. She details the United Nations' trial of three Rwandan journalists charged with inciting the murder of Tutsis. She follows their convictions for helping to start the RTLM hate radio station in Rwanda. She conveys how ordinary Rwandans felt during the three month-long genocide. She refers to her study as "the most notorious media trial since Nuremberg."
  • The Few Who Stayed: ARW reporting on Rwanda; U.N. Betrayal

    On the tenth anniversary of the genocide in Rwanda, American Radioworks aired this piece on the only American who stayed back in Rwanda. Carl Wilkens an American missionary helped save an orphanage and scoured the city of Kigali in search of water and medicines for the orphaned Tutsi children.
  • Bystanders to Genocide

    The Atlantic Monthly investigates "why the United states let the Rwandan tragedy happen." The story includes "exclusive interviews with scores of the participants in the decision-making." The author analyses "a cache of newly declassified documents" that reveal that "the U.S. government knew enough about the genocide early on to save lives..." The story reveals that "the U.S. did much more than fail to send troops...it lead a successful effort to remove most of the UN peacekeepers who were already in Rwanda." The article is a "chilling narrative of self-serving caution and flaccid will - and countless missed opportunities to mitigate a colossal crime."
  • Forsaken

    An attempt to explain the fighting in Africa. The Republic of Congo, formerly Zaire, has seen little political stability since independence in Belgium, serving more as an "all-purpose African battleground" for different interests of Africa rather than a struggle by its people. Current Congo President Kabila came to power backed by an army from Rwanda and Uganda and 10 other African nations, largely as payback for former President Mobutu support of the Power Hutus (in Rwanda) which resulted in 1994 genocide of 800,000 Tutsis AND moderate Hutus. Mobutu's ties with Rwanda spawned resentment from Congo natives. The climate was right for Kabila to seize power. Yet in 1998, Kabila transfers his allegiance to his former enemies, the Power Hutus, and Rwanda retaliates and other nations join the fray.
  • After the Genocide

    Gourevitch takes a look at the state-sanctioned killings in Rwanda which accumulated at nearly three times the rate of Jewish dead during the Holocaust. Members of the Hutu majority group began massacring the Tutsi minority in early April and at the end of the month dead Tutsis were easier to find in Rwanda than live Tutsis. That October a United Nations Commission of Experts found that the concerted, planned, systematic and methodical acts of mass extermination by Hutu elements against the Tutsi group constitute genocide.