Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "Uber" ...

  • CNN Investigates - Uber Sexual Assault

    CNN Investigates’ multi-part, five month-long reporting project focused on allegations of sexual assaults by drivers of the rideshare giant Uber. Uber pitches itself in advertising as a “safe ride home,” but CNN’s reporting found that in case after case across the country, Uber drivers prey on female passengers, and Uber’s background check process allowed thousands of convicted criminals to become drivers. CNN’s investigation led to safety changes in the Uber app, a change in the background check policy, and a change in Uber’s policy that forced sexual assault victims into arbitration and compelled them to sign non-disclosure agreements.
  • Bad Medicine

    An investigation into doctors who face discipline in one state, but are allowed to practice in others with clean licenses, and the broken system that puts patients at risk.
  • Poor worker conditions power gig ecomony

    In “Poor worker conditions power gig economy" FT reporter Izabella Kaminska takes on the job of a Deliveroo food delivery rider to investigate whether the so-called 'Uberisation' of the economy – which sees low-wage workers transformed into informal contractors – is a viable and sustainable technological labour innovation. The video likens this new labour structure to a renewed upstairs downstairs society, and questions the economic sustainability of these models in the long term.
  • Risk/Reward

    An investigation into the nation’s flawed system for approving new drugs, which allows pharmaceutical companies to produce expensive products of dubious value that put patients at risk.
  • Legislative Spending

    Both of the 2015 stories were part of an occasional series, “Watchdog Report: Legislative Spending,” that began in 2014. The series is based on an exclusive database created by The Morning Call to analyze legislators’ spending. Before that, taxpayers would have found it difficult to nearly impossible to find out how their representatives were spending their money. Legislators are not required to publicly reveal their individual expenses and the records are not uniform or easily digested http://www.mcall.com/news/nationworld/pennsylvania/legislator-expense-reports/mc-pa-house-expense-map-htmlstory.html http://www.mcall.com/news/nationworld/pennsylvania/legislator-expense-reports/mc-pa-senate-expense-map-htmlstory.html
  • European Jihadists

    As the world's attention turned to ISIS advancing from their staging ground in Syria through to Iraq, CNN International correspondent Atika Shubert and her team focused on the phenomenon of European jihadists joining their ranks. They are primarily young Muslims, who are drawn to fight in Syria -- often leaving solid middle-class homes and relatively comfortable lives to participate in “jihad” – holy war, alongside members of ISIS, al Qaeda and other groups. It is a phenomenon that keeps western intelligence agents up at night, and as this description is being written, Atika is in Paris reporting for CNN while French authorities are on a massive man-hunt for terrorists who may have done just that – gone to fight in Syria and come back to bring their extreme beliefs and its attendant violence back home. Through their reporting, Atika and her team have tried to understand the phenomenon – even interviewing British jihadists in Idlib, Syria via Skype to find out why they are there.
  • Following political money in a post-Citizens United world

    The Center for Public Integrity’s “Following political money in a post-Citizens United world” project was produced to help people understand which special interests are trying to influence U.S. elections, specifically by tracking the entities saturating television airwaves ahead of the 2014 elections and by following the money flowing from corporations to politically active nonprofits that generally do not disclose their donors. Together, the Center for Public Integrity’s widely used “Who’s Buying the Senate?” and “Who’s Calling the Shots in the States?” web apps allowed journalists and the General public to see what groups and power players were behind more than 2.5 million TV ads that aired in U.S. Senate races, statewide ballot measures and state-level contests such as gubernatorial elections and state Supreme Court races. Separately, the Center for Public Integrity’s seven-month-long analysis of voluntary corporate filings uncovered more than $173 million given to politically active nonprofits — such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce — that have been major players in elections and public policy battles.
  • Children in Danger/Foster Care Crisis

    Boston Herald's months-long investigation into the foster care system in Massachusetts, uncovering disturbing cases of abuse swept under the rug, hundreds of convicts living in foster homes and unlicensed social workers — among other findings — in a series that gained widespread attention and became one of the centerpieces of debate ahead of November's gubernatorial election.
  • Questionable drugs

    These stories examined how the FDA approved cancer and diabetes drugs over the last decade. It found that in 74% of cancer drug approvals and all diabetes drug approvals, the decision to allow the drugs on the market was based on surrogate measures of effectiveness such CT scans or blood tests rather than real clinical outcomes such as improved survival or reductions in heart attacks, strokes or blindness.
  • Insurance Influence

    As Texas was nearing the end of a decade-long legal fight over homeowners' insurance rates with the Famers Insurance Group, the company's employees PAC gave $50,000 to the gubernatorial campaign of Attorney General Greg Abbott — the top lawyer in the state's case against the company. That raised questions about the settlement reached in the case, which seemed, according to one judge involved, as though the state was being "deferential to Famers."