Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "abortion" ...

  • The War on Women Is Over—and Women Lost

    The aim of these stories was to take the effects of five years of severe new abortion restrictions out of the realm of abstraction and show readers how drastically these laws had made the experience of getting an abortion more difficult. This was done primarily through interviews with volunteers who help women secure funding for an abortion and arrange their onerous travel schedules; women who had crossed state lines for their abortion; abortion providers struggling to comply with new regulations; and by analyzing internal numbers from abortion clinics who treat large numbers of women from out of state.
  • Spotlight on the Texas Legislature

    During the 2013 legislative session, The Texas Tribune rolled out two entirely innovative ways to watchdog the state’s elected officials – the first-ever gavel-to-gavel livestream of Texas House and Senate proceedings, and the Ethics Explorer, an interactive investigative app documenting the conflicts of interest and financial relationships of every member of the Legislature. Combined, these two tools gave the Texas public unfettered access to the political maneuvering and shenanigans under the Pink Dome, including an unprecedented abortion filibuster that thrust our scrappy news organization into the national spotlight. No other Texas news organization came close to providing this service; they and many national news sites all relied on the Tribune. Check out the Tribune's interactive, livestream and video links below: http://www.texastribune.org/bidness/explore/ http://www.texastribune.org/session/83R/live/ http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2013/06/25/watch-wendy-davis-filibuster-of-texas-abortion-law-video/
  • Spotlight on the Texas Legislature

    During the 2013 legislative session, The Texas Tribune rolled out two entirely innovative ways to watchdog the state’s elected officials – the first-ever gavel-to-gavel livestream of Texas House and Senate proceedings, and the Ethics Explorer, an interactive investigative app documenting the conflicts of interest and financial relationships of every member of the Legislature. Combined, these two tools gave the Texas public unfettered access to the political maneuvering and shenanigans under the Pink Dome, including an unprecedented abortion filibuster that thrust our scrappy news organization into the national spotlight. No other Texas news organization came close to providing this service; they and many national news sites all relied on the Tribune.
  • Daily Beast: The Apple ‘Kill List’: What Your iPhone Doesn’t Want You to Type

    "Spell ‘electrodialysis’ wrong in a text, and Apple will correct you. Miss ‘abortion’ by one letter? You’re on your own. A Daily Beast investigation into your iPhone's hidden taboos." We investigated iPhone's spellcheck algorithm writing a series of scripts and iOS programs to mimic spellcheck hundreds of thousands of words and up to 14 different types of misspellings of those words. We found a list containing politically sensitive words that the iOS software will not accurately correct, even for slight misspellings.
  • Inside Scientology

    The investigation examines the extraordinary amount of control the Church of Scientology has over its members. One story shows how church members were pressured to get abortions or face jobs loss. Other stories examine the church's questionable finances.
  • Absolute Convictions: My Father, a City, and the Conflict that Divided America

    Reporter Eyall Press grew up with this story-- his father, Shalom Press, was a colleague of Dr. Barnett Slepian, the abortion provider who was murdered in Buffalo NY in 1988. Press used "newspaper articles, books, municipal reports, medical journals...videotapes, newslertters, journals, and court records" to document the abortion wars centered in western New York. His main sources were several hundred interviews with the participants in the conflict, including those with pro-life activists, some of whom had "spent years protesting outside my father's medical office in Buffalo, and, at times, outside the home where I grew up." (292 pages)
  • Scant Drop Seen in Abortions if Parents are Told

    The law requiring minors to notify their parents or get permission to have an abortion does not appear to have produced the sharp drop in teenage abortion rates that some advocates hoped for.
  • Romeo's Revenge

    This investigation found that Romeo Marquez, the publisher of Philippine Village Voice, a community newspaper, used his paper as a means to shame his former girlfriend. He included explicit details of their sexual relationship in the paper, along with an account of her alleged abortion. Furthermore, during the investigation KGTV 10 found that Marquez had two wives in the United States, one wife in the Philippines and also filed false statements to the US government to help his immigration status.
  • Let's Talk About Sex: A Look Into the Sexual Education, or Lack Thereof, of West County Teens

    This investigation examined teenagers attitudes about sex and focused on who or what influences their choices, their opinions and their actions. The story also discussed how educators view their role and what they teach as well as parent; perceptions of their children;s sexual activities. The story concluded that teenagers have varying views and attitudes depending on their individual backgrounds.
  • The Underground Economy: Illegal Markets in America

    A Marketplace week-long investigative series explores "how underground entrepreneurs - or criminals - make their business work while operating in ... America's many illegal markets." Washington-based reporter Steven Henn reveals how, in one way or another, government has pushed underground many industries and activities - including currency exchange, drugs, gun sales and ownership, gambling, abortion services, prostitution and midwives' birth-help practice. The series poises the question: Are these industries made more or less dangerous and abhorrent now that they have been pushed underground? One of the main reporting challenges has been protecting the identity of the interviewed criminals.