Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "accidents" ...

  • The Implant Files

    For decades, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s medical-device approval system has allowed defective implants to spill onto the market, like contaminated water from a broken pipe. Many of those products have remained on hospital shelves, and in patient bodies, long after problems were known. On Sunday, November 25, 2018, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, the Associated Press, the NBC News investigative unit and partners around the world published a yearlong investigation that shows regulators bowing to industry pressure to rush approvals, lower safety standards and cloak critical information, and the consequences: a string of grisly accidents that have left hundreds of thousands disfigured, disabled or dead.
  • ICIJ_NBC_AP_Partners: Implant Files

    Implant Files, the largest-ever collaborative health care investigation, sparked reforms by U.S. authorities by exposing the dark side of a global industry that pressures regulators to speed approvals, lower safety standards and cloak information, resulting in a string of grisly accidents that have left hundreds of thousands of patients disfigured, disabled or dead.
  • Trashed

    Fatal accidents; brutal work conditions; suspicious unions; lax oversight; mob ties and racketeers. Every night in New York, trucks from scores of private trash collection companies hit the city’s streets — often creating havoc and too rarely being reined in by regulators.
  • Aging aircraft and hidden threats

    While the Navy spent big over the past 20 years on experimental mine hunting technology that may never work, it stopped investing in its mine-hunting Sea Dragon helicopters, which have spent the better part of a year grounded due to mechanical problems after a series of deadly accidents. Now the service is trying to play catch-up. The Sea Dragon’s troubles are a symptom of a much larger problem: America’s military aircraft have been flown hard during 15 years of combat in the Middle East, and nearly all of their next-generation replacements are years behind schedule and millions over budget. The result: Much of the nation’s fleet is flying far longer than planned and in need of critical maintenance to keep them going. Their investigation found that the United State's Marine and Navy aircraft fleet has dismal readiness rates, as evidenced in an internal report obtained by the IRP and Virginian-Pilot. They examine what effect this has on our military's ability to counter the threat of sea mines.
  • Free to Flee

    In Florida, drunk drivers are routinely not arrested immediately after they cause a fatal crash, even when there’s sufficient probable cause to arrest them. In many cases, the drivers remain free as the investigations drag on for many months, well beyond accepted standards. Our investigation found that dozens of drunk drivers have escaped justice and hundreds more were left on the streets for years before being arrested and convicted, with some committing other crimes while they enjoyed their freedom.
  • Metro buses: Pedestrians in a blind spot?

    King County Metropolitan Transit District bus collisions with pedestrians grew substantially after schedules were tightened and drivers had less time to recover between trips. Collisions with walkers leaped 35 percent in the past four-plus years. And a group of accidents was disturbingly similar: A Metro bus manufactured by Orion turning left hit a pedestrian in a crosswalk. That model bus has a large pillar on the left-hand side of the windshield, making it difficult for the driver to see walkers while turning.
  • Drunk and Still Driving

    3 train derailments in a row, including one that forced a neighborhood to evacuate has jolted local residents. Fortunately, no one was killed in these accidents, but it's raising some questions.
  • Seat Back Failures

    Even if you bought a car with a five-star safety rating, if you're hit from behind, your seat may not protect you or the children sitting behind you. Experts say in certain crashes, some car seats can break and collapse, leading to paralysis or death. Kris Van Cleave reveals the findings of the investigation.
  • Tragic Harvest

    In “Tragic Harvest,” the Star Tribune revealed that farm deaths in Minnesota and other Midwestern states spiked in the past decade, and that virtually nothing is being done to combat the problem here. In fact, state and federal officials charged with overseeing workplace safety were unaware of the surge in deaths. We showed that most of the deaths are occurring on small farms that are exempt from government oversight, and that most fatal accidents occurred because farm workers violated workplace safety rules. We also showed how Washington, one of the few states to enforce workplace safety rules on small farms, has been able to reduce fatal accidents and significantly improve conditions for farm workers.
  • Dangerous Cargo

    CBS News exposes the role of a government agency in removing cargo pilots from national rest rules that could prevent deadly airplane accidents. https://vimeo.com/cbseveningnews/review/149908604/ef6230ae92