Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "addicts" ...

  • CBS News: Healthcare Fraud in America

    For the past four years, CBS News has been committed to investigating healthcare fraud throughout the United States. Our reporting has uncovered schemes preying on veterans, cancer patients, rural communities, and opioid addicts. We’ve been the only network to expose con artists defrauding billions from private insurance companies, Medicare and even Tricare, a component of the military health system. In 2016 we produced an investigative series that found compounding pharmacies were collecting prescriptions for pain creams and billing insurance more than $1 million per week. Last year, our reporting revealed an insurance scheme involving genetic testing that cost the Pentagon trillions. This year’s entries continue our work to expose unscrupulous actors bilking insurance to cash in on the American healthcare system. Our stories go beyond examining the fiscal toll of insurance fraud, they illustrate the human impact these practices have on communities, families, and individuals.
  • Sobriety for Sale

    As a heroin/opioid epidemic gripped Washington State, KING 5’s investigative team uncovered corruption at a series of state-licensed drug and alcohol treatment clinics. “Sobriety for Sale” revealed the secret payments that left addicts untreated, courts misled, and the public at risk. The series also exposed shoddy oversight by the little known state agency that is supposed to be the watchdog over Washington’s 570 licensed treatment clinics.
  • Prosecuting Pregnancy

    The criminalization of drug use in pregnancy is universally opposed by health officials and drug policy experts. But the idea that prison is a fitting punishment for prenatal drug use has become widely accepted in Alabama. Starting in 2006, prosecutors began charging women who used drugs during pregnancy with “chemical endangerment,” a form of child abuse that carries a one to 10-year prison sentence if a baby is unharmed and up to 99 years if a baby dies.
  • Addiction Treatment: Inside the gold rush

    Flying beneath the radar, Palm Beach County’s thriving addiction treatment industry, one of the nation’s largest, is exploiting vulnerable addicts seeking help, gouging insurers and families and engaging in fraud, all in pursuit of outlandish profits from simple drug screen tests. The Palm Beach Post exposed industry practices as an FBI task force secretly gathered evidence toward indictments still not issued as of January 2016. The Post exposed out-of-control sober home operators Ken Bailynson and Kenny Chatman and gave the community its first look deep into the industry’s sordid underbelly. https://github.com/PalmBeachPost/postgeo https://github.com/PalmBeachPost/dbfs2csv
  • Profiting from Addiction

    Drug addicts and homeless people seeking a way out in New York are instead being referred to unregulated, decrepit “three-quarter” houses, where they are often exposed to unscrupulous operators, some of whom require they attend rehabilitation classes of the operators’ choosing, even if it means relapsing to be able to keep a bed.
  • Supplement Shell Game

    An investigation by USA TODAY reporter Alison Young revealed that a wide array of dietary supplement companies selling products dangerously spiked with hidden pharmaceuticals are headed by executives with criminal backgrounds and run-ins with regulators. They’re convicted felons, thieves, drug addicts, narcotic sellers and more, the reporting revealed. And once they enter the lucrative, $30-billion-a-year supplement business, almost anything goes. Criminals turned supplement entrepreneurs have repeatedly put risky products on the market through a changing series of companies as overwhelmed regulators struggled to keep up. Their pills and powders have included everything from a sleep-aid laced with a powerful anti-psychotic drug, to a widely sold workout supplement spiked with a methamphetamine-like chemical never before tested on people.
  • 'Crooked Care' - Investigation into Narconon of Georgia

    Our year-long investigation culminated with the closure of a drug rehabilitation facility accused of deceiving patients, court officials and state regulators in order to enhance profits funneled to its benefactor, the Church of Scientology. Georgia's Insurance Commissioner and a local district attorney launched an ongoing criminal investigation after reviewing our findings that Narconon of Georgia lied about its license, billed insurance companies for treatment never received (that families had already paid for), and opened credit cards in the names of clients without their permission. For a decade, state regulators tasked with oversight of drug rehabilitation facilities had ignored complaints from vulnerable drug addicts and their families, repeatedly reversing fines and citations. The state ultimately revoked Narconon of Georgia's license as a direct result of our reporting. This investigation was a collaborative effort between WSB-TV, WSB-Radio and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. A reporter from each institution shared the research and reporting responsibilities. The stories were featured on all three platforms simultaneously. In addition, each entity spotlighted the story digitally with extensive online coverage, due to the worldwide interest the story gleaned.
  • Supplement Shell Game

    An investigation by USA TODAY reporter Alison Young revealed that a wide array of dietary supplement companies selling products dangerously spiked with hidden pharmaceuticals are headed by executives with criminal backgrounds and run-ins with regulators. They’re convicted felons, thieves, drug addicts, narcotic sellers and more, the reporting revealed. And once they enter the lucrative, $30-billion-a-year supplement business, almost anything goes. Criminals turned supplement entrepreneurs have repeatedly put risky products on the market through a changing series of companies as overwhelmed regulators struggled to keep up. Their pills and powders have included everything from a sleep-aid laced with a powerful anti-psychotic drug, to a widely sold workout supplement spiked with a methamphetamine-like chemical never before tested on people.
  • Rehab Racket

    Taxpayers spend tens of millions of dollars each year in California on drug rehab centers designed to help low-income addicts. The clinics make their money billing for every client counseled. But CNN and The Center for Investigative Reporting exposed glaring and systemic failures in the program, including pervasive fraud – reporting that led to scores of clinics getting shut down. In coverage rolled out over several months, the team showed that taxpayers had spent at least $94 million over two years on Los Angeles-area clinics with clear signs of fraud or questionable billing. Regulators who could have stopped the abuses instead let misdeeds multiply. As a result of "Rehab Racket," the official overseeing the program apologized for the poor oversight and the state shut down a total of 177 clinic locations. Officials referred 69 clinics to the state Department of Justice, which opened criminal investigations.
  • Rehab Racket

    Taxpayers spend tens of millions of dollars each year in California on private drug rehab centers designed to help low-income addicts. The clinics make their money billing for every client counseled. But reporters from The Center for Investigative Reporting and CNN exposed glaring and systemic failures in the program, including pervasive fraud – reporting that led to scores of clinics getting shut down. In coverage rolled out over several months, the team showed that taxpayers had spent at least $94 million over two years on Los Angeles-area clinics with clear signs of fraud or questionable billing. Clinic directors pressured counselors to pad bills with “ghost clients” they never saw. Clinic staff bribed some of the region’s poorest residents to show up for counseling they didn’t need. In an ultimate irony, addicts were enticed to attend rehab sessions with gifts of booze and cigarettes. Regulators who could have stopped the abuses instead let misdeeds multiply. CIR reporters Christina Jewett and Will Evans teamed with CNN senior investigative producer Scott Zamost and investigative correspondent Drew Griffin to produce our series, “Rehab Racket,” on multiple platforms. Jewett and Evans wrote the stories for CIR and CNN. The cable network produced video that aired on “Anderson Cooper 360” and both of our websites.