Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

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Search results for "adenovirus" ...

  • A Dangerous Delay

    In November 2018, Olivia Paregol’s father frantically called the University of Maryland from the intensive care unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The 18-year-old freshman, who had lived in a mold-infested dorm, was fighting for her life and doctors couldn’t figure out what was wrong. Was there anything else on campus making students sick? The director of the student health center knew of severe cases of adenovirus on campus but the public had no clue. Less than a week later, Olivia was dead from the virus and the outbreak would sicken dozens of students. It was only after her death that school officials informed the campus about the virus. Ian Paregol had more questions than answers: How long had the university known? Why didn’t they tell Olivia or other students when they showed up sick at the student health center? Washington Post reporters Jenn Abelson, Amy Brittain and Sarah Larimer interviewed more than 100 people and obtained thousands of pages of medical records, hundreds of emails, text messages, voicemails and other documents to reconstruct the events that led to Olivia’s death and threatened the health and safety of thousands of students at the University of Maryland campus. College officials said it would cost $63,000 to disclose internal emails about the outbreak, so reporters obtained many of those records from state and county agencies. In May, the Washington Post published “A Dangerous Delay,” a detailed investigation examining the outbreak of mold and adenovirus at the University of Maryland. The reporters revealed that the school waited 18 days to inform students about the virus and officials discussed — but decided against — notifying students with compromised immune systems, like Olivia, and those living in mold-infested dorms.
  • Outbreak: A Common Virus, A Military Recruit - And a Mysterious Death

    The Wall Street Journal exposes the failure of the Pentagon to provide military training camps with vaccines against a wide-spread virus that in some cases can lead to death. The story reveals that the so-called adenovirus is a common one that causes respiratory illnesses, but "poses a unique problem for the military's nine basic-training camps" because of the "combination of cramped living quarters, close contact and stress." The report sheds light on the deaths of two recruits believed to have lost their lives because of the virus. A major finding is that in the 80s, because of tightened health budget, the military turned down Wyeth Laboratories' offer to buy vaccines, and now is expected to end up spending between $15 and $25 million on a far more expensive project to find a new manufacturer.