Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "aircraft" ...

  • Military Times: Aviation in Crisis

    The Aviation in Crisis package offered an unprecedented look at the scope of aviation crashes, mishaps and fatalities around the world. It documented at least 133 fatalities and a 40 percent rise in mishaps during a five-year span. It also included a first-of-its-kind public database that is searchable by military base, aircraft type, etc.
  • Chapecoense: The dark aspects of the catastrophe

    An aircraft belonging to the Bolivian company LaMia crashed into a mountain in the Department of Antioquia, Colombia, on Nov. 28, 2016, killing 71 and injuring 6 with varying degrees of severity. Almost the entire Brazilian soccer team Asociación Chapecoense de Fútbol died in the greatest aviation tragedy in the history of this sport. This is the starting point for the documentary “Chapecoense: The dark keys of the catastrophe,” a production by CNN en Español in which a team of journalists conducted a thorough investigation that spanned more than a year and 10 countries.
  • Aging aircraft and hidden threats

    While the Navy spent big over the past 20 years on experimental mine hunting technology that may never work, it stopped investing in its mine-hunting Sea Dragon helicopters, which have spent the better part of a year grounded due to mechanical problems after a series of deadly accidents. Now the service is trying to play catch-up. The Sea Dragon’s troubles are a symptom of a much larger problem: America’s military aircraft have been flown hard during 15 years of combat in the Middle East, and nearly all of their next-generation replacements are years behind schedule and millions over budget. The result: Much of the nation’s fleet is flying far longer than planned and in need of critical maintenance to keep them going. Their investigation found that the United State's Marine and Navy aircraft fleet has dismal readiness rates, as evidenced in an internal report obtained by the IRP and Virginian-Pilot. They examine what effect this has on our military's ability to counter the threat of sea mines.
  • Spies in the Skies

    America is being watched from above. Government surveillance planes, operated by the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security, routinely circle over most major cities. We assembled an unprecedented picture of the operation’s scale and sweep by analyzing more than 4 months of aircraft tracking data for about 200 federal aircraft.
  • SPECIAL FORCES AIRSTRIKES

    Freelance War Reporter Alex Quade exclusively embedded with Special Forces “A-Teams” in Iraq, as they went after high value terrorist targets & called in airstrikes with A-10s & F-16s during combat missions. Quade spent years tracking down those same aircraft, to bring the audience on ride-alongs to explain their close air support role. Quade battled military PAOs to allow her to release her video now, as it explains how airstrikes are conducted with Special Forces today in Iraq & Syria. This is the very first soup-to-nuts explainer of close air support from all angles. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUlvs3nK_YI
  • The Pentagon Finally Details its Weapons-for-Cops Giveaway

    The Marshall Project, in collaboration with MuckRock, published, for the first time, agency-level data on the Pentagon's 1033 program, a program brought to light during the protests in Ferguson, Mo., in which the Pentagon gives surplus weapons, aircraft and vehicles to law enforcement agencies. We wrote an initial story on the data, created an easy-to-use, embeddable widget, and put together a "Department of Defense gift guide," highlighting some of the more perplexing giveaways. The story led to unprecedented public scrutiny of military equipment going to law enforcement agencies, as over forty local news outlets published articles detailing what their local cops had received.
  • USAT: Unfit for Flight

    "Unfit for Flight" reveals the hidden dangers of private aviation by exposing how manufacturers let defective parts and designs remain in place for decades, federal investigators fail to find defects because they do cursory crash investigations, and federal regulators let manufacturers build brand-new aircraft under safety standards that are decades old. The series exposes manufacturer negligence that has led companies to pay hundreds of millions of dollars in legal settlements, many of them confidential and reported for the first time.
  • Broken Dreams: The Boeing 787

    Jumping off from the battery failures that caused an unprecedented grounding of the 787 fleet in January 2013, "Broken Dreams" explores how Boeing's signature product went so wrong and reveals fresh revelations regarding the safety and quality of the aircraft, including workers afraid to fly the plane they build. "Broken Dreams" ties the well-known story of the battery failures and grounding to a larger, unexplored economic critique. It's the story of a management hungry for Wall Street returns, emboldened by its outsized power in Washington, and enabled by a cozy relationship with a compromised regulator, the Federal Aviation Administration.
  • Drones

    With U.S. officials disclosing scant details of drone strikes targeting suspected terrorists in Pakistan, Yemen and elsewhere, NBC News' Investigative Unit went to work to find out what the government wasn't telling us about the program. Over the course of the year, numerous reporters, producers and correspondents contributed to a thorough report that shed light on many different aspects of the program and broke news about the use of the remote-controlled aircraft..
  • Spy Drones Aiding Police

    Government surveillance drones have been used, with no public notice, to assist local police departments inside the U.S. find suspects and conduct. A Los Angeles Times/ Tribune Co. Washington Bureau investigation uncovered for the first time over two dozen uses of the Department of Homeland Security drones to help local law enforcement in North Dakota, where two of the department's nine Predator B aircraft are based.