Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "ambulance" ...

  • Kaiser Health News and USA TODAY Network: Surgery Center deaths

    Millions of Americans are having routine surgeries performed at the nation’s 5,600-plus surgery centers, the small facilities that promise to get you in and out quickly, and at a much lower cost. But some of those facilities lack the staff or training to handle emergencies, and have been taking on increasingly fragile patients. It’s a dangerous situation that has put patients’ lives at risk and even children’s lives at risk, a groundbreaking investigation by Kaiser Health News and USA Today Network discovered. Hundreds of patients, some as young as two, have died after having surgeries as simple as tonsillectomies or colonoscopies. And at least 7,000 patients a year had to be raced by ambulance to a local hospital when something went wrong.
  • Deadly Delay: Tampa's Broken Ambulance System

    An ambulance responding to a heart attack call broke down, costing the patient valuable time that could have saved his life. The ABC Action News I-Team found out that ambulance was old, was unreliable and, unfortunately, was typical of Tampa's advanced life support ambulance fleet. We discovered the city spent millions of new parks from the same fund which could have replaced aging ambulances, which put lives at risk.
  • EMS in Iowa

    The stories detailed Iowa's broken EMS system, and included detailed findings on violent criminals working as EMTs, the lack of state oversight, the shortage of volunteers, and the laws that require the state to keep secret the response times of ambulance services.
  • Pueblo halfway house

    An inmate at a halfway house in Pueblo, CO died after taking a lethal dose of Fentanyl while inside the facility and under the supervision of staff. The ambulance wasn’t called until after his death. Criminal investigations to prosecute drug dealers went cold.
  • EMTs & Emergency Medical Services: How a Broken System Endagers Iowans

    The stories detailed Iowa's broken EMS system, and included detailed findings on violent criminals working as EMTs, the lack of state oversight, the shortage of volunteers, and the laws that require the state to keep secret the response times of ambulance services.
  • MKE Journal Sentinel: Police Problems

    In Milwaukee, there may be no institution more powerful, more troubled and more determined to fight public scrutiny than the police department. It is a dangerous combination. In 2012 alone, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel exposed how two officers ignored a handcuffed prisoner’s gasps and pleas for help, refused to call an ambulance in violation of department policy, and then were cleared of responsibility despite indications they played a role in the man’s death. We revealed deep flaws with the city’s crime numbers and showed how the chief, instead of fixing them, misled the public about its safety while boosting his resume. All the while, the department has worked to stymie scrutiny, from charging unpermitted fees for access to public records to dropping daily media briefings in favor of news dispensed via Twitter and a flashy new website ironically dubbed “The Source.”
  • Are EMS Companies Taking Medicare For A Ride?

    The Houston Chronicle published stories detailing how Houston was the nation's private ambulance capital and how it was connected to questionable Medicare payments and unregulated for-profit mental health clinics.
  • Parking Patients

    "Parking Patients" examined the amount of time hospitals in the Memphis area were taking to assume custody of patients brought to their emergency departments by city ambulances. In hundreds of cases we found patients were spending hours strapped to ambulance stretchers, waiting inside emergency departments for hospital staff to sign off on the transfer of care. In the meantime, city paramedics were tied up waiting with the patients and unavailable to answer other emergency calls. We found dozens of cases in the last year in which the city ran out of available ambulances to answer these calls, and had to rely on private companies to fill the gap, sometimes resulting in longer response times. The fire department blamed these shortages on the practice of hospitals using paramedics as "free labor."
  • Trauma in Chicago

    Chicago is served by six level-one trauma centers sprinkled throughout the city -- but none is on the city's South Side. A WBEZ analysis suggests that patients living on the Southeast Side face longer ambulance run times than other residents in the city.
  • "33 Minutes to 34 Right"

    When Continental Flight 1404 crashed during its landing at the Denver International Airport, it took ambulance responses teams 33 minutes to reach the crash site. KMGH-TV's investigation reveals critical problems with Denver's ambulance system and dispatch center, as well as with the city's overall preparedness for emergency response.