Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "army" ...

  • Families complain of mold, lead paint, rats in military housing ahead of hearing

    In February, CBS News gained access to privatized housing at Ft. Meade, becoming the first national television network to go on to a military base to investigate issues within the U.S. military’s privatized housing program. Through our coverage, CBS News exposed problems with mold, insects and structural integrity covered up or ignored by private housing companies. This story led to a swift response from then-Secretary of the Army Mark Esper, who granted an exclusive on-camera interview with CBS News to outline how his department planned to respond.
  • Citizen 865: The Hunt for Hitler’s Hidden Soldiers in America

    Through insider accounts, Justice Department documents and research in four countries, Citizen 865 chronicles the setbacks, failures and great successes of a small team of federal prosecutors and historians that spent decades working to expose a brutal group of Nazi war criminals living in the United States. In 1990, in a basement archive in Prague, two American historians made a startling discovery: a Nazi roster from 1945 that no Western investigator had ever seen. The long-forgotten document, containing more than 700 names, helped unravel the details behind the most lethal killing operation in World War Two. In the tiny Polish village of Trawniki, the SS set up a school for mass murder and then recruited a roving army of foot soldiers, 5,000 men strong, to help annihilate the Jewish population of occupied Poland. More than 1.7 million Jews were murdered in fewer than 20 months, the span of two Polish summers. After the war, some of these men vanished, making their way to the U.S. and blending into communities across America. Though they participated in some of the most unspeakable crimes of the Holocaust, “Trawniki Men” spent years hiding in plain sight, their secrets intact. In a story spanning seven decades, Citizen 865 details the wartime journeys of two Jewish orphans from occupied Poland who outran the men of Trawniki and settled in the United States, only to learn that some of their one-time captors had followed. A team of prosecutors and historians pursued these men and, up against the forces of time and political opposition, battled to the present day to remove them from U.S. soil.
  • AP: Cops Sell Guns

    After a year’s worth of work, the AP found that law enforcement agencies in Washington state sold about 6,000 guns that had been confiscated during criminal investigations, and more than a dozen of those firearms later became evidence in new investigations. The weapons were used to threaten people, seized at gang hangouts, discovered in drug houses, possessed illegally by convicted felons, found hidden in a stolen car, taken from a man who was suffering a mental health crisis and used by an Army veteran to commit suicide.
  • Selfie Soldiers: Russia's Army Checks In To Ukraine

    As the conflict in Ukraine continues, so too does Russian President Vladimir Putin's denial of any Russian involvement. But a recent report from think tank the Atlantic Council used open source information and social media to find evidence of Russian troops across the border. Using the Atlantic Council's methodology, VICE News correspondent Simon Ostrovsky follows the digital and literal footprints of one Russian soldier, tracking him from eastern Ukraine to Siberia, to prove that Russian soldiers are fighting in Ukraine. https://news.vice.com/video/selfie-soldiers-russia-checks-in-to-ukraine
  • Missed Treatment: Soldiers With Mental Health Issues Dismissed For ‘Misconduct’

    We revealed for the first time that the Army has kicked out tens of thousands of soldiers who came back from Iraq and Afghanistan with mental health problems and traumatic brain injuries, and taken away their benefits, on the grounds that those soldiers committed some sort of “misconduct”– despite the fact that Congress passed a law in 2009 to try to prevent it. Our stories were not only the first ones that revealed this crucial information: Army officials told us that until we asked and pushed for these statistics under FOIA, they never compiled them, period.Our report also showed that a top-level Army investigation, into allegations that soldiers were being mistreated, was essentially a whitewash. And we let the public hear, for the first time, actual psychotherapy sessions between a troubled soldier and Army psychiatrists. You can actually hear the therapists belittle the soldier and shrug off his mental health problems. http://www.npr.org/2015/10/28/451146230/missed-treatment-soldiers-with-mental-health-issues-dismissed-for-misconduct
  • Relentless Strike: The Secret History of Joint Special Operations Command

    Relentless Strike is the first full-length history of Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC), the secret military organization that, away from the public eye, has become the military’s main effort in the wars of the 21st century. JSOC runs many of the United States’ most sensitive missions and commands its most secret “special mission units,” including SEAL Team 6, Delta Force and the even more secret “Army of Northern Virginia.” The book contains dozens of scoops and sheds new light on every period of JSOC’s history and virtually every major mission it has conducted. http://www.amazon.com/Relentless-Strike-History-Special-Operations/dp/1250014549/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1452551893&sr=1-1&keywords=Relentless+Strike
  • A Losing Battle

    “A Losing Battle” delves into the Army Board for Correction of Military Records (BCMR), a little-known internal panel mandated to “correct errors or remove injustices” on service members’ military records, including overturning a discharge that left them without medical benefits for service-related injuries. We found that when service members filed appeals that could lay significant blame on the Army or cost a lot of money, the default answer was no. Our investigation found that the Board routinely denied applicants their due process, uniformly denying in-person hearings, refusing to admit evidence and not responding to evidence brought, leaving service members with nowhere else to seek justice within the Armed Forces.
  • System Failure

    An innocent man spends 6 years in prison for the murder of his infant daughter. It was never a crime to begin with. The forensic science used to convict him was flawed. It’s another example of the shoddy work of a Minnesota medical examiner we have investigated and reported on since early 2010. We continued our coverage this year with 2 more stories. One features an in-depth look at the case of the man wrongfully convicted of killing his child who was set free after a review of the evidence. The other examines the mysterious death of an Army National guardsman and the lack of a thorough investigation by the medical examiner to find the true cause of the soldier’s death.
  • The Tender Soldier: A True Story of War and Sacrifice

    "The Tender Soldier" is the first deeply reported narrative nonfiction account of the Human Terrain System, a controversial, experimental Army program that embeds civilian social scientists, including anthropologists, psychologists and sociologists, with front line combat units to provide cultural knowledge and intelligence to soldiers and marines. The program was developed in the early years of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and launched its first field team in Khost, Afghanistan in 2007.
  • A Losing Battle: How the Army denies veterans justice without anyone knowing

    “A Losing Battle” delves into the Army Board for Correction of Military Records (BCMR), a little-known internal panel mandated to “correct errors or remove injustices” on service members’ military records, including overturning a discharge that left them without medical benefits for service-related injuries. Fusion found that when service members filed appeals that could lay significant blame on the Army or cost a lot of money, the default answer was no. Their investigation found that the Board routinely denied applicants their due process, uniformly denying in-person hearings, refusing to admit evidence and not responding to evidence brought, leaving service members with nowhere else to seek justice within the Armed Forces.