Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "arrests" ...

  • Puerto Rico After the Storms: Recovery and Fraud

    U.S. taxpayer are footing the biggest bill ever for a natural disaster, $91 billion, going to a government mired in corruption and under FBI investigation. We are the only news program that we know of to tackle and extensively report on how much has been promised and how little has actually been received in the wake of hurricanes Maria and Irma. We travelled to the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico, learning there has been a great deal of misreporting and misunderstanding about these numbers, which were not easily accessible. To get at the true amounts, we obtained and examined federal and territory documents, pressed the governor’s office, and interviewed officials responsible for the aid including Puerto Rico’s top hurricane recovery official and FEMA’s top official in Puerto Rico. During our visit, there was a popular uprising against the government followed by the governor's resignation, and additional FBI arrests of U.S. and Puerto Rican officials and contractors.
  • WRAL: School arrests

    WRAL's analysis of federal education data found that black students in North Carolina are arrested at schools or school functions six times as often as white students. That disparity is one of the worst in the nation.
  • State Police Troopers, Supervisors Charged in Overtime Scandal

    Dozens of respected members of the Massachusetts State Police are suspended, so far ten have been criminally charged, and the investigations by federal and state prosecutors are continuing with more arrests expected in 2019. All of this is the result of a massive overtime scheme that was uncovered by 5 Investigates, the investigative team at WCVB in Boston. This is a precedent setting scandal that has unfolded in Massachusetts since our initial investigation. The work of 5 Investigates began in 2017 with dozens of public records requests and our first story in October that revealed supervisors and troopers who appeared to be earning thousands of dollars in overtime they never worked. By early 2018, we began to see significant developments -- suspensions, arrests for theft of taxpayer money, and a response from the Governor that resulted in some of the largest reforms within the State Police that Massachusetts has ever seen.
  • The Orange County Register: Rehab Riviera

    Our Rehab Riviera series continued to probe the dark side of addiction treatment in California in 2018, documenting sexual assault inside rehabs and how sober homes make their money. Our work changed state and local laws, spawned a task force and arrests, and sparked Congressional Committee hearings and investigations.
  • IRW: The Boy on the Bus

    The Investigative Reporting Workshop found deep cracks in the registry system for sex offenders that allow predators to move, skip registration, and begin new lives under the radar in a new neighborhood — unless they are arrested again. The story was published with IowaWatch.
  • Gaming the Lottery: An International Investigation of the Nearly $300 Billion Industry

    This project extended our investigation into the global lottery industry. In 2018 we revealed Massachusetts’ failure to implement the policy it had announced to monitor frequent lottery winners and the state’s wildly inequitable system of distributing lottery proceeds, the cynical targeting of poor people in Bolivia and systemic corruption in the South African lottery. We filed more than a dozen FOIA requests, analyzed hundreds of thousands of records, read hundreds of documents, scraped 17 years of lottery grant recipients’ data. We conducted dozens of interviews, generated widespread media pickup and interest from colleagues in multiple countries, Our findings and reporting led to arrests and official investigations in the United States and South Africa.
  • FOX 5 Atlanta $2 Tests: Bad Arrests

    "Test kits don't lie." That's what we heard on dash cam video as another cop led another innocent Georgian to jail based on the false positive results of a drug field test. In fact, some test kits do lie, and sometimes with terrible consequences. Our investigation provided a first-time look at the big picture and continues to change the way law enforcement trusts these tests.
  • Direkt36: Russian arms dealers

    Two Russian arms dealers operating in Hungary, Vladimir Lyubishin Sr. and Jr., were apprehended as a result of a U.S. DEA sting operation in late 2016. The Lyubishins wanted to supply a Mexican drug cartel with weapons to protect shipments of cocaine against US authorities and rival gangs. In reality, the Russians were negotiating with paid DEA informants. After the arrests, however, the Lyubishins managed to escape US justice thanks to Hungary’s Kremlin-friendly government as Hungary denied Washington’s request for extradition and sent the two arms dealers to Moscow instead. The operation as well as the extradition scandal was kept secret and was first revealed by my story.
  • Detroit Free Press: They look like cops, but they're not

    A Detroit Free Press investigation found that police agencies across Michigan are supplementing their ranks with unlicensed civilians, commonly called reserve officers, who wear uniforms and badges and carry guns. But these volunteers are unregulated and not subject to state-established training standards, despite frequently assisting real cops on patrol and, sometimes, with arrests. No one had ever tallied the number of reserve officers in Michigan, so the Free Press did and uncovered a staggering number, and many who had committed crimes and other misdeeds.
  • Charity "Scam" Uncovered

    A tip leads Investigative Reporter Hillary Lake to discover the Ohio State Auditor’s office had shut down a charity that funded a “Shop with a Cop” program, but one man was using the charity’s name to continue to collect money. The investigation reveals more than $150,000 was stolen from thousands of victims over several years. Prosecutors were able to shut down the operation after they arrested the man who was collecting money, and say more arrests are likely.