Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "attack" ...

  • Pentagon secretly struck back against Iranian cyberspies targeting U.S. ships

    In the middle of June, tensions were rising between the United States and Iran. Iran had attacked oil tankers traveling through the Strait of Hormuz, and then downed an expensive, high-tech Navy RQ-4 Global Hawk surveillance drone flying over the Strait, upping the ante of the conflict. Given previous rhetoric from Trump administration officials including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo against the Iranian regime, the decision to exit the Iran deal or the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, and the increasingly heavy sanctions on Iran, the Yahoo News team was monitoring for chances to report in more depth on specific Iranian capabilities as well as U.S. plans to counter them. Following the attack on the U.S. drone, Yahoo News began communicating with sources who had extensive detail on a specific unit within the Iranian military in the cross-hairs of the U.S. military, a unit that had advanced its cyber capabilities to the point that it was able to track nearly all ships traveling through the Strait through both social engineering, or pretending to be attractive women engaging with service members traveling on the ships, to actually compromising ship GPS data websites in order to digitally monitor their paths. In the course of reporting, Yahoo News discovered a key, news breaking event—that just hours prior, the U.S. Cyber Command had launched a retaliatory strike aimed at limiting the capabilities of the specific Iranian cyber group the team had already been investigating. Yahoo was the first to break the news of the retaliatory strike, leading dozens of major news outlets to race to match the story. However, given the fact Yahoo News was investigating details into the cyber unit, our story was not only first but best and most detailed. The story demonstrates our ability to jump into the news cycle, provide key breaking news to our readers, as well as dig deep into illuminating new details. The story also revealed that Iranian capabilities to intercept and down drones to study them for espionage purposes was highly advanced, a fact previously unknown. Given President Trump’s recent decision to authorize a strike to kill IRGC Commander Qasem Suleimani, our reporting will continue to provide value to readers, analysts, and other interested parties hoping to better understand Iranian capabilities and how the U.S. might respond to them.
  • School Violence

    A young woman sexually assaulted, a grade-nine student “jumped” from behind, kicked in the head and left unconscious, another beaten in the hallway while students watched and recorded on their phones, Indigenous elementary students chased and in fear, a black student repeatedly attacked, called names and physically assaulted. All of these students bravely came forward, seeking help from those who are supposed to protect them - their teachers, principals and coaches. School should feel safe but for these students and thousands of others, school didn't feel safe anymore. Gaining the trust of these young people and telling their stories in a meaningful, empowering way became our goal. CBC’s months-long investigation also took a data-driven approach to document what many called a rise of violence in Canada’s schools. We gave a voice to more than 4,000 students through a groundbreaking survey while documenting a shocking lack of reporting, countrywide.
  • The Hacker Who Took Down a Country

    The story chronicled how one hacker took nearly a whole country offline and revealed, for the first time, how and why he did it. Our reporting showed that Daniel Kaye was a mercenary, that he’d been paid to carry out the attack by the CEO of a large African telecommunications company, who had since gone into hiding. The story gave an unprecedented insight into the world of darkweb hackers and the unscrupulous figures who hire them.
  • "The Costs of the Confederacy" / "Monumental Lies"

    Reporters Brian Palmer and Seth Freed Wessler, along with a team of Type Investigations researchers, spent more than a year investigating public funding for sites—monuments, statues, parks, libraries, museums—and Confederate “heritage” organizations that promote an inaccurate “Lost Cause” version of American history. According to scholars, that ideology distorts the nation’s collective past by venerating Confederate leaders and the common Confederate soldier; framing of the Civil War as a struggle for Southern states’ rights against “northern aggression”; denying Southern culpability and slavery itself for any role in precipitating the war; and presenting chattel slavery as a humane, Christianizing institution. This is more than mere Confederate myth-making, it is a century-and-half old strategy that was historically deployed to terrorize and disenfranchise African American citizens and to reinstall white supremacy across the South in the wake of Reconstruction. The historic sites that perpetuate these myths have been central to racial violence in recent years, from the Dylann Roof shooting at the AME Zion Church — he had visited Confederate sites before his attack — to the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, centered around the defense of a Confederate monument.
  • Yemen's War: Made in America

    When a Saudi air strike hit a school bus in August killing 40 children, CNN’s Nima Elbagir was ahead of her competitors in covering the event from London using footage and information from a cadre of carefully vetted Yemen-based journalists. Using this local network, and with the consultation of weapons experts, Nima and her team proved the bomb used in the attack was US-made. Then they went further and obtained exclusive access to documentation on a string of other civilian bombings in Yemen, proving that in many cases the rain of death in Yemen is made in America.
  • The Daily News: The 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund

    During the course of reporting on the anniversary of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center, Daily News reporter Thomas Tracy spoke with an official on the record who said that the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund was running out of money. Tracy broke the news exclusively that the fund would not have enough money to help all survivors sickened at Ground Zero.
  • Texas Observer: Access Denied

    The Texas Public Information Act is under attack. The law, which ensures the public’s access to government records, has taken a beating from state Supreme Court jurists, lawmakers and state agencies since it was passed in 1973. Once a shining example of government transparency, the law has been eroded by a growing list of loopholes for everything from ongoing police investigations and the dates of birth of government employees to information related to executions. Journalists are well aware of this problem, but it had never been presented to the public in a deep-dive feature until now. “Access Denied” reveals that government officials can delay, derail and deny requests by slow-walking them or charging exorbitant fees. This piece was reported over six months and included interviews with dozens of government officials, investigative journalists, citizen activists and researchers.
  • SWEDISH RADIO: The bombings, the Security Service and the Nazis

    In November 2016 and January 2017, three bombings are perpetrated in the Swedish city of Gothenburg. The attacks target newly arrived refugees and left-wing activists. One cleaner at a refugee centre is critically injured. The Security Service quickly identifies three local Nazis as those responsible. Later, when they are sentenced by the District Court, the investigation is introduced as a huge success. But when Swedish Radio starts looking into the police investigation, it turns out that the Security Service has had several opportunities to stop the bombings, that they had taken considerable risks in securing evidence, and that one of the bombs were planted right under the noses of the Security Service agents, without them intervening. The review resulted in massive criticism of the Security Service, from the police as well as from experts on terrorism. The review resulted in massive criticism of the Security Service, from the police as well as from experts on terrorism.
  • Columbus Dispatch: Wanted

    This four-day series examines the more than 5.7 million unserved criminal arrest warrants in the United States. As law enforcement struggles to find and arrest these suspects, who are often wanted for violent crimes including murder and rape, victims wait in fear that their attackers will return.
  • Deadly Delay: Tampa's Broken Ambulance System

    An ambulance responding to a heart attack call broke down, costing the patient valuable time that could have saved his life. The ABC Action News I-Team found out that ambulance was old, was unreliable and, unfortunately, was typical of Tampa's advanced life support ambulance fleet. We discovered the city spent millions of new parks from the same fund which could have replaced aging ambulances, which put lives at risk.