Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "attacks" ...

  • The Daily News: The 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund

    During the course of reporting on the anniversary of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center, Daily News reporter Thomas Tracy spoke with an official on the record who said that the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund was running out of money. Tracy broke the news exclusively that the fund would not have enough money to help all survivors sickened at Ground Zero.
  • SWEDISH RADIO: The bombings, the Security Service and the Nazis

    In November 2016 and January 2017, three bombings are perpetrated in the Swedish city of Gothenburg. The attacks target newly arrived refugees and left-wing activists. One cleaner at a refugee centre is critically injured. The Security Service quickly identifies three local Nazis as those responsible. Later, when they are sentenced by the District Court, the investigation is introduced as a huge success. But when Swedish Radio starts looking into the police investigation, it turns out that the Security Service has had several opportunities to stop the bombings, that they had taken considerable risks in securing evidence, and that one of the bombs were planted right under the noses of the Security Service agents, without them intervening. The review resulted in massive criticism of the Security Service, from the police as well as from experts on terrorism. The review resulted in massive criticism of the Security Service, from the police as well as from experts on terrorism.
  • Austin American-Statesman: Inside Texas State's Year of Hate

    As a string of neo-Nazi and white supremacist propaganda attacks roiled the Texas State University campus in 2016 and 2017, the administration’s response baffled -- and angered -- many. But it wasn’t until the American-Statesman waged a months-long effort to obtain internal records related to the response that the public learned that university leaders several times chose damage control over action and struggled to form a coherent response or strategy.
  • Accounting for Terror

    As terrorism shook the Western world in 2016, The Wall Street Journal investigated an area largely unexamined in the public furor over repeated attacks: the money trail. In a yearlong series, “Accounting for Terror,” a team of Journal reporters followed the money—in one case, literally. The stories illuminated an invisible foundation of ISIS and other terrorist groups: the economic engines that support their reign of murder and violence. The Journal obtained secret ISIS documents describing the terror group’s construction of a multinational oil operation obsessed with maximizing profits. It showed how some suspects in the Paris and Brussels terrorist attacks collected welfare benefits until just before they acted. And it detailed how an iconic American food producer of Butterball turkeys has done millions of dollars of business in Africa with a company blacklisted by U.S. authorities for supporting terrorism.
  • Terror in Europe

    An in-depth investigation of the terror campaign that overwhelmed the defenses of Europe in 2015 and 2016. The documentary and companion article told the story of the Charlie Hebdo attacks, the November 2015 attacks on Paris, and the bombings in Brussels in March, 2016, with a focus on the longtime structural flaws in Europe’s counter-terror defenses – problems that were well-known but repeatedly ignored. Our investigation found that many of these problems persist even after the attacks. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/terror-in-europe/
  • Fan Safety at Arrowhead

    In the wake of 9/11 and more recent terrorist attacks, the NFL has made fan safety at football stadiums a top priority. But we uncovered another kind of terror that's not getting much attention: fights caused by drunk, unruly fans. Our investigation revealed there are more reports of fights and assaults at Arrowhead than at stadiums in similar sized markets. In 2013, one of those Arrowhead fights claimed the life of a young man and father of a seven-week-old baby. His family and others assaulted at Arrowhead say there isn't enough security at the stadium to protect fans. http://fox4kc.com/2015/11/23/critics-say-violence-isnt-limited-to-collisions-on-the-gridiron-at-arrowhead-stadium/
  • Terror in Little Saigon

    FRONTLINE and ProPublica team up to investigate a wave of terror that targeted Vietnamese-American journalists. Uncovering a trail that leads from American cities to jungles in Southeast Asia, FRONTLINE and ProPublica shine new light on a series of unsolved murders and attacks. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/terror-in-little-saigon/
  • Tucson ministry a cult, former followers say

    An investigation by Arizona Daily Star reporters Carol Ann Alaimo and Emily Bregel revealed that a local ministry, Faith Christian Church, had for decades been aggressively recruiting members on the University of Arizona’s campus, leaving in its wake a trail of traumatized former members who describe the church as a cult. Their stories — told independently over weeks of reporting — were remarkably similar. They included reports of hitting infants who exhibit a “rebellious spirit,” financial coercion, alienation from parents, public shaming of members and shunning of those who leave the church or question its leaders. After leaving, some say they spent years in therapy for panic attacks, depression, flashbacks and other symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • My Brother's Bomber

    Who was really responsible for one of the worst terrorist attacks on Americans before 9/11? Broadcast as a three-part, serial investigation into the 1988 Lockerbie bombing, “My Brother’s Bomber” takes viewers on a journey to find the men who carried out the terrorist bombing of Pan Am Flight 103—an attack that killed 270 people from some twenty countries, including the filmmaker’s older brother David Dornstein. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/my-brothers-bomber/ http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/my-brothers-bomber/#video-2 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/my-brothers-bomber/#video-3
  • Peace Corps Failing Volunteers

    CBS News has obtained evidence that the Peace Corps is struggling with sexual assaults in its ranks. A survey shows nearly 20 percent of volunteers experienced some type of sexual assault, and more than half of those say they suffered repeat attacks. Pressure to change a culture of victim-blaming goes back years, but some survivors still claim they are blamed or punished. Kris Van Cleave reports.