Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "awling" ...

  • Bribery Division

    The Bribery Division, an international investigation into Latin America’s largest construction company, reveals fresh evidence of hundreds of millions of dollars in suspicious payments linked to major infrastructure projects. Brazilian multinational Odebrecht has been implicated in a cash-for-contracts scandal that the U.S. Department of Justice has described as “the largest foreign bribery case in history.” The Bribery Division investigation unveils dramatic new information in taking readers inside the belly of the beast: Odebrecht’s Division of Structured Operations, a specialized unit created for the primary purpose of managing the company’s graft. A team of more than 50 journalists across the Americas, led by ICIJ, examined more than 13,000 Odebrecht documents from a secret communication platform used by the Structured Operations unit. The team’s sprawling expose revealed Odebrecht’s cash-for-contracts operation was even bigger than the company had acknowledged to prosecutors and had involved prominent figures and massive public works projects not mentioned in the criminal cases or other official inquiries to date.
  • The Global Heist

    A two-year Wall Street Journal investigation uncovered a $6 billion international scandal, sprawling from Hollywood to Saudi Arabia to the prime minister of Malaysia, through Wall Street banks, white-shoe law firms and holes in the financial system.
  • The CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley: Bringing Home America’s Fallen Correspondent: Chip Rei

    Four-story series on waste and mismanagement within the Pentagon agencies responsible for bringing home the remains of 83,000 US military personnel who never returned from battle. Despite a budget of more than $100 million, the series revealed the POW/MIA Accounting Community, as it is officially known, has a very poor record of repatriating and identifying remains. In fact, the Pentagon’s results were eclipsed by those of a non-profit charity whose work we carefully documented. Two days after our first story ran, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered a thorough review of the sprawling Pentagon bureaucracy. The CBS reporters followed up with another story when Hagel ordered a massive reorganization. The story included interviews with family members who endured years of agony while they pleaded for answers from the Pentagon. CBS also reported on a highly critical DoD Inspector General’s report months before it was officially released. The fourth story in the series tracked the work of History Flight, a charity that has successfully recovered WWII remains on the Pacific Island of Tarawa. CBS reporters traveled to Tarawa with six US Marines, now in their 90s, on their first return visit since they fought there in 1943. The series documented the emotional scene as they witnessed History Flight’s painstaking recovery of their fellow Marines. http://vimeo.com/cbseveningnews/review/115438489/56d862cc1e
  • Crossing Alone

    When the influx of children from Central America across the southern border made news last summer, the national media descended on Texas. But Houston Chronicle reporter Susan Carroll was already investigating the federal government's sprawling - and secretive - shelter network for unaccompanied children. She found the small agency tasked with their care unaccountable and overwhelmed. Children were being subjected to sexual and physical abuse, and their attackers were escaping federal prosecution.
  • The Hole

    On any given day, hundreds of immigrants are held in solitary confinement at the 50 largest detention facilities that make up the sprawling patchwork of holding centers nationwide overseen by Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials, according to new federal data, and nearly half are isolated for 15 days or more, the point at which psychiatric experts say they are at risk for severe mental harm. The same main story was featured on both the: Workshop’s site: http://investigativereportingworkshop.org/investigations/the-hole/ story/the-hole/ NYT’s site: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/24/us/immigrants-held-in-solitary-cells-often-for- weeks.html?hp&_r=0
  • Cops. Cash. Cocaine.

    Rather than chase drug dealers out of town, police in the city of Sunrise invited them in. The suburban South Florida town has no great cocaine trafficking problem, but police found that selling kilos of the drug, at a discount, could make them millions. The Sun Sentinel exposed the undercover operation and provided a unique look at how far one local police department would go to use forfeiture laws to seize cash and assets from criminal suspects. Many of the deals took place in and around family restaurants, such as TGI Fridays, near the town’s main attraction, a sprawling outlet mall. Police often engineered the stings with the help of a professional lady informant. The newspaper found the city had paid her more than $800,000 over five years to target individuals and draw them into Sunrise. Cops working the stings had a financial incentive too: they made considerable overtime from forfeiture funds.
  • Not all of Hinchey's earmarks live up to billing

    One of the leading politicians in central New York is longtime US Rep. Maurice Hinchey. He has been unapologetic and prolific crafting earmarks that steer federal funds into his sprawling district. Many in the Hudson Valley can see the results: a pedestrian bridge that spans the Hudson River, renovations for an historic opera house and help to at-risk youth. There are dozens and dozens of others. By one estimate, two years ago the senior Democrat was among the nation's top 12 earmarking members of Congress. But a review found his earmarks have not always lived up to billing. Money for solar energy companies that did not create hundreds of promised jobs. A presidential helicopter that was supposed to be built largely in Owego, NY, is scrapped, and was decried by President Obama and US Sen. John McCain, among others, as an extremely wasteful. Also not fulfilling promises was a military contractor where dozens of jobs were predicted. While Hinchey had been identified in the past as prolific with earmarks, even the past two years finding ways to work around Congress’ ostensible ban on earmarks, no one had gone back through the public record to examine on a large scale whether key projects lived up to promises. The students obtained and examined federal databases on earmarks, read the public record on pronouncements at the time the earmarks were issued, and identified key projects that did not live up to billing.
  • Age of Treason

    Sharrock "presents an extensively reported portrait of the Oath Keepers, a self-styled patriot group that has established itself as a hub in the sprawling anti-Obama movement...the group recruits soldiers and law enforcement officers, asking them to reaffirm their oath to hold up the Constitution, but with a twist: they also vow to disobey any "illegal" or "unconstitutional" orders. While the Oath Keepers' official message is nonviolent, Sharrock uncovers how the group attracts conspiracy-minded members who are stockpiling weapons and advocating armed resistance against a government crackdown that they fear is imminent."
  • Blood of her Blood

    The article traces copyright ownership of the works by late writer Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. Specifically it answers the question "Who owns 'Cross Creek'?" It also generally address how copyright laws and inheritance can result in strange or unfair consequences.
  • State of Denial

    This story looked at the conflict between Californians' consumption of resources and their environmental protection tendencies. The reporters tracked down some of the top exporters of California-bound products-oil, lumber, fish-and followed those products to their sources. They found there was environmental destruction on a scale that would never be allowed in the state of California. In two of the three cases, native indigenous people were those being harmed the most.