Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "babies" ...

  • Texas Tribune: Dangerous Deliveries

    The Texas Tribune's Dangerous Deliveries project revealed how state lawmakers squandered opportunities to help more women access life-saving services, and how that fed the state's crisis-level maternal mortality rate for black women. And it underscored the critical nature of the problem by telling the stories of women like Sable Swallow, an uninsured waitress who was released from the hospital after giving birth even though she told nurses she had a terrible headache. After she left the hospital, the 25-year-old had a stroke.
  • ProPublica: The Child Abuse Contrarians

    Judges and juries hearing cases of alleged physical abuse of babies rely on expert witnesses to illuminate the medical evidence based on an impartial examination of the record and the victims. But in two fascinating investigative profiles co-published by ProPublica and The New Yorker, ProPublica Senior Reporter David Armstrong exposed a pair of sought-after expert witnesses who fall far short of this standard. Both work exclusively for accused child abusers and use dubious scientific arguments to make their case, potentially undermining justice and endangering children. Their success underscores the susceptibility of the U.S. judicial system to junk science, as well as the growing suspicion of mainstream medicine in an era when misinformation quickly spreads online.
  • GateHouse Media: Failure to Deliver

    More women are choosing to deliver their babies outside the hospital as a part of a growing national trend, but a nine-month investigation by GateHouse Media and the Sarasota Herald-Tribune found that it’s a deadlier practice than hospital deliveries and leaves families little recourse when something goes wrong.
  • Born to Drugs, Maine’s Most Innocent Victims.

    Nearly 6,000 babies have been born affected by drugs in Maine in the past five years. These innocent victims are caught in a crisis that is marked by suffering and strained hospitals and state resources. In this series of often gut-wrenching stories, Pine Tree Watch examines the challenges within this sad reality.
  • Born on Drugs

    What happens to children who are born drug-exposed - and what happens to their parents? Over the course of the generation spanning “crack babies” to “heroin babies,” California and the nation have made legal and philosophical shifts, removing fewer drug-exposed children from their parents’ care and working harder to make fractured families whole again. Sometimes, it works. Most often, it doesn’t.
  • Black Market Babies

    The series investigated illicit adoptions of babies born to mothers from the Marshall Islands.
  • The Innocents: How U.S. Immigration Policy Punishes Migrant Children

    Federal immigration policies that separated children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border had real, traumatic consequences on the most vulnerable members of our society. This series of exclusive investigations identified “tender age shelters” warehousing babies and toddlers, exposed a Virginia shelter where migrant teenagers described horrific abuse and followed a Salvadoran mother who came close to losing her daughter to adoption, revealing the legal possibility that separated children could be permanently taken from their parents. AP also followed the money, highlighting the billion-dollar business in migrant child detention, a sector that has grown tenfold in the last decade. Just before year’s end, AP broke the news that the government was keeping most of the 14,000 migrant kids in its care in shelters with hundreds of others, despite expert warnings that mass institutionalization can cause life-long trauma. Based on deep source reporting and exclusive data, the story was the first to provide the number of children in every government-contracted detention center, shelter and foster care program dating back to 2017 - data the government had been withholding all year.
  • Stealing Hope

    Thousands of infants are happily adopted in the U.S. each year, but many prospective parents are duped during the process by scammers who fool them with fake babies. Most of these con artists never attempt to extort any money from prospective parents, making them all but impossible to prosecute. They seem content playing a sick game with very desperate people and they steal nothing more than hope.
  • Vaccine Glass

    Vaccine maker Sanofi Pasteur discovered tiny pieces of glass in batches of a vaccine intended for babies. But Sanofi did not issue a recall. Rather, it allowed doctors and nurses throughout the country to continue injecting babies with glass for another year and a half.
  • The Traffickers: The Girl in the Window

    The Traffickers is an investigative documentary series which traces the global trafficking routes of some of the world’s most sought after commodities: Gold, exotic animals, sex, even human body parts - anything can be bought for a price. The aim was ambitious - to give an exclusive guide to the global black market world, with high production values, excellent cinematography, dynamic story-telling and outstanding journalism. The series is presented by Nelufar Hedayat, who herself was trafficked as a child refugee from war-torn Afghanistan. During the course of filming, Nelufar visited 22 different countries, criss-crossing the world to follow the story. The Dark Side of Adoption reveals how American couples adopting babies from the DRC can be caught up in an adoption scam which hoodwinks unsuspecting parents into giving up their children.