Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "beating" ...

  • Texas Observer: Access Denied

    The Texas Public Information Act is under attack. The law, which ensures the public’s access to government records, has taken a beating from state Supreme Court jurists, lawmakers and state agencies since it was passed in 1973. Once a shining example of government transparency, the law has been eroded by a growing list of loopholes for everything from ongoing police investigations and the dates of birth of government employees to information related to executions. Journalists are well aware of this problem, but it had never been presented to the public in a deep-dive feature until now. “Access Denied” reveals that government officials can delay, derail and deny requests by slow-walking them or charging exorbitant fees. This piece was reported over six months and included interviews with dozens of government officials, investigative journalists, citizen activists and researchers.
  • Analyzing police use-of-force data

    After a yearlong open records battle, the San Antonio Express-News obtained and analyzed a use-of-force database from the San Antonio Police Department. The records showed that officers used force against black and Hispanic suspects at a rate that was up to 78 percent higher than white suspects, yet less than one percent of 5,300 force incidents resulted in any kind of policy violation. The newspaper brought those stunning numbers to life with police suspension records, video, DocumentCloud and interviews with victims -- including an innocent man who was paralyzed after he underwent surgery to treat injuries from a police beating.
  • The God Loophole

    At least 16 states exempt religious daycares from standard licensing rules. In six states, the exemptions are so broad that even the most basic rules are lifted – such as bans on beating kids, how many workers must be hired to watch children and whether they need to be trained in CPR. The results can be tragic.
  • The homicide files

    A four-part series including: "At the Roundhouse: How detectives compel murder 'confessions,'" "How police harassed a family," "A police beating...and a decision not to charge detectives," "How detectives escape prosecution," and more.
  • Fairbanks Four Taste Freedom

    Christmas week Alaska Natives and other supporters cheered as the Fairbanks Four were freed after serving 18 years for a murder committed by others who've been identified through new and old confessions. Release came through a settlement following a contentious five-week evidentiary hearing forced by Alaska Innocence Project. That effort arose from UAF Journalism Professor Brian Patrick O’Donoghue’s, student-assisted, 14-year investigation of a local teen’s fatal 1997 beating. When the professor was forced to the sidelines defending his reputation in July, court-savvy undergraduate Julia Taylor tweeted 25 days of hearings that backed up more than a decade of coverage about flaws in the original case identified through UAF Journalism’s Hartman Justice Project public-service investigation.
  • Criminalizing Kids

    With disturbing national data findings, our multiplatform “Criminalizing Kids” report revealed that Virginia leads the nation in sending students into the criminal justice system for misbehavior as insignificant as kicking a trash can—and as trumped up as a 12-year-old accused of obstruction of justice. Our multiple follow stories revealed more examples of how disabled and black students are arrested in disproportionate numbers, and how Virginia’s governor and local cities reacted to our findings by instituting reforms. Our second in-depth investigation, “An Epidemic of Questionable Arrests,” took us in partnership with KQED public radio to San Bernardino, Calif., where harsh policies have led to deputies hogtying and arresting a Down syndrome student; an officer beating a student who hugged his girlfriend; and school police in one medium-sized district arresting more kids annually than municipal cops arrest in some of California’s biggest cities. http://www.publicintegrity.org/2015/04/10/17074/state-state-look-students-referred-law-enforcement
  • The Dark Side: Secrets of the Sports Dopers

    This is the first undercover investigation into the world of performance enhancing drugs in American sports. In order to shed light on this otherwise opaque world, Al Jazeera hired a professional athlete to infiltrate a network of doctors, pharmacists and others who are complicit in helping athletes cheat the system. They shared with Al Jazeera their techniques for beating the tests and finding sources for designer drugs. They also provided the names of elite athletes that they worked with. The investigation has shifted the national conversation about illicit drug use in the NFL and will spur numerous inquiries into the allegations levied in the film. The fallout will likely continue for months, perhaps years, as criminal investigations build on the research gathered in this project. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJRPxmTuxoI
  • For Jared Remy, leniency was the rule until one lethal night

    On the morning of Aug. 16, 2013, New England awoke to the horrifying news that Jared Remy – the son of Jerry Remy, a homegrown Red Sox infielder-turned-broadcaster - had allegedly stabbed and killed his girlfriend, Jennifer Martel, in a brutal slaying while the two were home with their four-year-old daughter. The Globe's exhaustive reporting revealed the previously unknown but extraordinarily violent past of the son of one of New England’s most revered figures, gave voice to some of his victims, and detailed a history of enabling and undeserved second chances. The major findings also included uncovering Remy’s previously concealed role in the gratuitous, savage beating of a teenage boy at a 1997 high school party, a beating that would shatter multiple lives and likely contribute to the boy’s eventual suicide.
  • Battered, Bereaved, and Behind Bars

    This story exposes what many believe is a grievous injustice: Dozens of battered women have been locked away for a decade or more because they failed to prevent the men who battered them from also beating their children. BuzzFeed News found 28 cases in 11 states where mothers were sentenced to 10 years or more in prison under "failure-to-protect" laws despite evidence they were battered. More than a dozen are in prison for 20 years or more, and several are in on longer sentences than the men convicted of committing the abuse. And there are likely more out there.
  • Revenge Beatdown

    These stories document perjury, assault, false arrest and cover-up by a reckless cadre of SWAT officers. The first news story on the conspiracy and revenge beating ran in January, 2014. In February, Alabama Media Group reported in detail on the unsolved execution linked to the beating. This was followed by several incremental stories throughout the year. The reporting culminated in a seven-part series in December, telling the story of the revenge beatdown and the conspiracy from the point of view of two honest police officers who attempted to investigate their own.