Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "billionaires" ...

  • Opportunity Zones

    Trump’s only significant legislative achievement was his 2017 tax code overhaul. It contained a provision to help the poor, called “opportunity zones.” In 2019, ProPublica showed that while the benefits to the poor have not yet materialized, some people have already reaped the rewards: the wealthy and politically connected. We found that wealthy developers lobbied government officials and got their long-planned investments in luxury projects included in the program, despite its avowed goal of attracting new investment into poor areas. Critically, two of our stories feature areas that never should have been qualified for the program in the first place, but were allowed in by a deeply flawed implementation of the law by the U.S. Treasury Department. They were then selected by state governors after lobbying efforts by wealthy developers. Our articles, along with those of other outlets, led to Congressional calls for investigations into the designation process, as well as proposed reforms to make the program more transparent and to eliminate potential abuses by investors.
  • Panama Papers

    The Panama Papers investigation reveals the offshore links of some of the globe’s most prominent figures. The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, German newspaper Suddeutsche Zeitung and more than 100 other media partners spent a year sifting through 11.5 million leaked files to expose the hidden financial dealings of world leaders, fraudsters, gangsters, drug traffickers, billionaires, celebrities, sports stars and more. The investigation revealed companies that helped fuel Syria’s deadly air war and a network of people close to Russian President Vladimir Putin that secretly moved as much as $2 billion through banks and offshore companies.
  • Comrade Capitalism

    In these investigations, Reuters revealed how Putin’s daughter secretly married the son of an old friend of the president; how Putin’s new son-in-law went on to acquire a stake worth $2.85 billion in Russia’s biggest petrochemical processor; how that stake was financed by a cheap loan from a bank run by associates of Putin; and how the petrochemical company is now benefiting from $1.75 billion in cheap state finance. While much has been written about other Russian billionaires, no one has previously succeeded in shedding so much light on the finances of the president’s family. Former KGB officer Putin has long claimed to be a man of modest means, a frugal figure atop the former communist country now plundered by crony capitalism. http://www.reuters.com/investigates/section/comrade-capitalism-2015/
  • Testing Theranos

    Americans have been fascinated with successful entrepreneurs since the days of Horatio Alger. In recent years, Silicon Valley billionaires like Apple’s Steve Jobs, Google’s Larry Page and Sergey Brin and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg have become icons. Elizabeth Holmes looked to be next. Claiming she was transforming medicine with her blood-testing company, Theranos Inc., the 31-year-old Stanford University dropout became a celebrity. The New Yorker and Fortune published admiring profiles. Time named her one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World. Harvard’s medical school appointed her to its prestigious board of fellows. President Obama named her a U.S. ambassador for global entrepreneurship. Theranos became the nation’s largest private health-care startup, with Ms. Holmes’s stake valued at more than $4.5 billion.
  • Breaking Point: Personal tales of New Jersey's tax crush

    This investigation into New Jersey's highest-in-the-nation property tax system found that it is forcing people out of their homes, fueling the big business of tax lien sales, forcing homeowners to pay billions in extra taxes because of the faulty assessment system. Loopholes in the law allow billionaires and land developers to get a 98 percent tax break.