Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or [email protected] where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "black" ...

  • Policing in America: Five Years after Ferguson

    CBS News’ “Policing in America: Five Years After Ferguson” is a first-of-its-kind investigation into changes that police departments across America say they're making regarding race and policing since the shooting death of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and unrest in Ferguson, Missouri five years ago.
  • School Violence

    A young woman sexually assaulted, a grade-nine student “jumped” from behind, kicked in the head and left unconscious, another beaten in the hallway while students watched and recorded on their phones, Indigenous elementary students chased and in fear, a black student repeatedly attacked, called names and physically assaulted. All of these students bravely came forward, seeking help from those who are supposed to protect them - their teachers, principals and coaches. School should feel safe but for these students and thousands of others, school didn't feel safe anymore. Gaining the trust of these young people and telling their stories in a meaningful, empowering way became our goal. CBC’s months-long investigation also took a data-driven approach to document what many called a rise of violence in Canada’s schools. We gave a voice to more than 4,000 students through a groundbreaking survey while documenting a shocking lack of reporting, countrywide.
  • Easy Targets

    There are some sixty-three thousand licensed gun dealers in the U.S.—nearly twice the number of McDonald’s and Starbucks combined. But, unlike other businesses that deal in dangerous products, such as pharmacies or explosives makers, most gun stores face no legal requirements to secure their merchandise. As a result, there has been a sharp increase in gun-store thefts. This story focuses on a group of thieves who preyed on gun stores in North Carolina, stealing more than two hundred weapons over a four-month period. The Trace and The New Yorker relied on thousands of public records and more than fifty interviews to track these guns through a network of black-market profiteers.
  • Reveal: Kept Out

    Fifty years ago, the Fair Housing Act banned government-sponsored racial discrimination in mortgage lending, known as redlining. But black and Latino borrowers continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgages at rates far higher than their white counterparts. Kept Out, a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, is based on a yearlong analysis of 31 million mortgage records. Reveal found this modern-day redlining in 61 metro areas, even when people of color make the same amount of money, take on the same amount of debt and look to live in a similar neighborhood as white borrowers.
  • Walking While Black

    “Walking While Black,” a meticulously researched and powerful reporting project, showed Jacksonville's enforcement of pedestrian violations to be racially disproportionate. Using hard-won data from a variety of local and state agencies, Topher Sanders and Ben Conarck, both veterans of reporting in Jacksonville, showed the disparities across every category of pedestrian tickets in Duval County. They then found those ticketed, and chronicled the impact — on their driver’s licenses, on their credit ratings, on their day to day ability to work and raise families in a city notorious for its lack of adequate pedestrian infrastructure.
  • So Close, Yet So Costly

    The Great Lakes is experiencing a water affordability crisis that has driven families into debt and led to thousands of people losing access to water. An investigation by APM Reports and Great Lakes Today examined the cost of water over the last 10 years in the six largest cities on the Great Lakes - Chicago, Cleveland, Milwaukee, Detroit, Buffalo and Duluth. In the past decade water rates have been rising alarmingly fast, sometimes as much as 200%. As water gets more and more expensive, poor families and communities of color have been hit the hardest. Government run utilities have issued over 360,000 water shutoff notices in the past decade, concentrated in majority black and Latino neighborhoods.
  • Kept Out

    Fifty years ago, the Fair Housing Act banned government-sponsored racial discrimination in mortgage lending, known as redlining. But black and Latino borrowers continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgages at rates far higher than their white counterparts. Kept Out, a multi-platform investigation by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, is based on a yearlong analysis of 31 million mortgage records. Reveal found this modern-day redlining in 61 metro areas, even when people of color make the same amount of money, take on the same amount of debt and look to live in a similar neighborhood as white borrowers.
  • Driven Into Debt

    This ongoing series of stories — which started at ProPublica Illinois and later was produced in collaboration with WBEZ — exposed how the city of Chicago’s aggressive and unequal ticketing practices, combined with punitive collections measures, have pushed tens of thousands of mostly black motorists into Chapter 13 bankruptcy. The stories have also examined Chicago’s cottage industry of bankruptcy attorneys who profit off consumers with ticket debt, even as their clients often sink even deeper into debt; the racially disparate consequences of license suspensions for unpaid tickets; and an ill-fated decision to hike the price of what was already one of the most expensive tickets in the city.
  • NPR/PBS Frontline/Ohio Valley ReSource: Coal's Deadly Dust

    Coal's Deadly Dust asked a fundamental question about an unprecedented epidemic of the advanced stage of black lung disease (Progressive Massive Fibrosis or PMF), among coal miners. How and why did this happen? How could it happen given a regulatory system designed to protect miners from the toxic dust that causes disease? The investigation documented the failure of federal regulators and the mining industry to protect coal miners from the epidemic of disease, despite clear evidence in federal data, clear evidence in mining practices, decades of recommendations to take action, and awareness of the danger.
  • WUSA 9 -- "DC Police: Stop and Frisk"

    Through analyzing more than 6 years of data WUSA 9's “DC Police: Stop and Frisk” series uncovered 8 out of 10 people stop and frisked by Washington, DC police are African-American, despite black people making up less than half the city's population. The year-long investigation, 20 part series and hour-long special that followed exposed shocking and systematic failures by the Washington, DC Metropolitan Police Department to follow its own laws. Laws designed to protect people from racial bias on the part of police officers.