Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "boats" ...

  • The Texas Observer with The Investigative Fund: The Surge

    If Texas’s border counties have some of the lowest crime rates in the nation, why are they so heavily policed? As Melissa del Bosque shows, the State of Texas has gone all in on border security spending, devoting $2.6 billion to special-ops teams, armored gunboats, high-tech spy planes, and a surge of law enforcement personnel in the past several years — on top of a multibillion-dollar federal border security operation. For her piece for The Texas Observer, in partnership with The Investigative Fund, del Bosque interviewed residents and elected officials in these border counties, now among the most profiled and surveilled communities in America, who described how this two-fisted border security buildup has taken a toll on their civil liberties. In a separate analysis, Del Bosque joins with reporter G.W. Schulz to uncover how Texas's $15 million high-altitude spy planes have surveilled one border town at least 357 times and may have traveled multiple times into Mexican territory.
  • Exploited in Paradise

    Hundreds of foreign fishermen without visas are confined to American boats for years at a time in Hawaii, due to a federal loophole that allows them to work but exempts them from most basic labor protections.
  • Repossessing boats and cars when their owners don't pay for them

    While the recession means hard times for most businesses, the repossession industry is soaring, especially in South Florida, where many boats are repossessed.
  • "Full Disclousure"

    In this investigation, ABC Action News revealed a political scandal the included a county commissioner and candidate for the state senate. Commissioner Jim Norman failed to disclose several personal properties, including two boats and a lake front vacation home. As a result of the investigation, Norman was removed from the state senate race.
  • Rohingya: A Forgotten People

    This investigation reveals abuse committed by the Thai Military against Rohingya minorities fleeing from Burma. The Thai Military would intercept Rohingya boats with refugees aboard and tow them out to the middle of the sea and leave them without adequate supplies. Being without food and water many of the Rohingya refugees died, but the numbers are unclear as to how many people actually died.
  • Cuban Smugglers

    "The lucrative but dangerous business of smuggling Cubans into the United States is highly organized and growing fast. It is financed mostly by Cuban-American families in South Florida and involves smugglers and financiers in the Miami area, along with arrangers and transporters in Cuba and Mexico." Coast Guards in the United States, Havana, and Cuba are "frustrated by what they see as a national security threat as hundreds of boats a year come from Florida to pick up passengers illegally on the Cuban coast."
  • A Perilous Place to Play, Navigate

    The Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri is the third-most accident-prone waterway in the U.S., after the Atlantic Ocean and the Colorado river, according to U.S. Coast Guard boating accident data from 1995-2004.
  • Floating Loopholes

    This investigation exposes the various loopholes that allow yacht-owners to lower or avoid the taxes they incur by buying luxury boats. Some of the ways people avoid taxes are declaring their yachts as a second home, using charter arrangements and buying yachts offshore to avoid state sales tax.
  • Peril on the water

    Missouri has the most alcohol related boating accidents of any state. The authors crunched the numbers, looked for possible reasons for the high rate of accidents, and discussed legal options to encourage less drinking on the lakes.
  • Making Waves. As U.S. trade grow, shipping cartels get a bit more scrutiny. The price fixing pact hurt consumers, critics say; lines defend the system. How Philadelphia took a hit.

    According to the article, "Every two weeks, in an unobtrusive office building here (in Rutherford, N.J.), about 20 shipping-line managers gather for their usual meeting. They sit around a long conference table, exchange small talk over bagels and coffee and then begin discussing what they will charge to move cargo across the Atlantic Ocean. All very routine, except for one detail: They don't work for the same company. Each represents a different shipping line, supposedly competing for business. Under U.S. antitrust law, most people doing this would end up in court."