Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "bombing" ...

  • Yemen's War: Made in America

    When a Saudi air strike hit a school bus in August killing 40 children, CNN’s Nima Elbagir was ahead of her competitors in covering the event from London using footage and information from a cadre of carefully vetted Yemen-based journalists. Using this local network, and with the consultation of weapons experts, Nima and her team proved the bomb used in the attack was US-made. Then they went further and obtained exclusive access to documentation on a string of other civilian bombings in Yemen, proving that in many cases the rain of death in Yemen is made in America.
  • SWEDISH RADIO: The bombings, the Security Service and the Nazis

    In November 2016 and January 2017, three bombings are perpetrated in the Swedish city of Gothenburg. The attacks target newly arrived refugees and left-wing activists. One cleaner at a refugee centre is critically injured. The Security Service quickly identifies three local Nazis as those responsible. Later, when they are sentenced by the District Court, the investigation is introduced as a huge success. But when Swedish Radio starts looking into the police investigation, it turns out that the Security Service has had several opportunities to stop the bombings, that they had taken considerable risks in securing evidence, and that one of the bombs were planted right under the noses of the Security Service agents, without them intervening. The review resulted in massive criticism of the Security Service, from the police as well as from experts on terrorism. The review resulted in massive criticism of the Security Service, from the police as well as from experts on terrorism.
  • Canada's role in innocent man's imprisonment

    This investigative report on the extradition of Hassan Diab to France revealed for the first time the secret efforts Canadian officials went to in order to send an innocent man to a French prison. Diab would spend more than 3 years in near-solitary confinement while he was investigated for a bombing outside a Paris synagogue. Canada went to great lengths to extradite Diab despite warnings that the French case was extremely weak. The French case ultimately fell apart due to flimsy evidence.
  • The White Helmets

    In most Syrian cities, there is no police, fire department or government emergency service left, but there is the Syrian Civil Defense, known on the ground by the stark white helmets they wear.
  • Terror in Europe

    An in-depth investigation of the terror campaign that overwhelmed the defenses of Europe in 2015 and 2016. The documentary and companion article told the story of the Charlie Hebdo attacks, the November 2015 attacks on Paris, and the bombings in Brussels in March, 2016, with a focus on the longtime structural flaws in Europe’s counter-terror defenses – problems that were well-known but repeatedly ignored. Our investigation found that many of these problems persist even after the attacks. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/terror-in-europe/
  • How your 401k profits from bombing Yemen

    An exclusive investigation series tracking shipments of weapons exported by Italy to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates since the bombing campaign on Yemen began in March 2015. The investigation found verifiable evidence of the Italian-manufactured bombs on the ground in Yemen, and showed how readers may be profiting from the sales of these weapons through sovereign and institutional funds.
  • My Brother's Bomber

    Who was really responsible for one of the worst terrorist attacks on Americans before 9/11? Broadcast as a three-part, serial investigation into the 1988 Lockerbie bombing, “My Brother’s Bomber” takes viewers on a journey to find the men who carried out the terrorist bombing of Pan Am Flight 103—an attack that killed 270 people from some twenty countries, including the filmmaker’s older brother David Dornstein. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/my-brothers-bomber/ http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/my-brothers-bomber/#video-2 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/my-brothers-bomber/#video-3
  • 108 Hours: Inside the Hunt for the Boston Marathon Bombers

    As the one-year anniversary of the bombings approached, Brian Williams and a team of producers, crews and editors set out to produce an in-depth look at the attack, using a unique frame: the 108 hours that elapsed between the start of the race and the capture of the second suspect. Our program aired April 11, 2014 and was the culmination enterprise journalism. The program examined the actual hunt for the suspects through the eyes, and in some cases the gun sights, of those directly involved in the manhunt.
  • Terror in Boston

    When terror struck at the Boston marathon, ABC News Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the Investigative Team raced to the scene and stayed for weeks, uncovering exclusive details and providing round-the-clock coverage surrounding the plot that tragically took the lives of three innocent people and brought the city of Boston to a standstill for five days. In a series of 17 stories in the week following the explosions, and a total of 35 aired television investigative reports in the month afterwards, Ross and his team reported on every ABC News platform and breaking news report. The team was the first to report that pressure cookers and components of toy remote control cars were used to construct the bombs, intimate details about what bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev wrote right before he was captured, and new leads in the investigation, including a photo of the suspects taken inside a Lord & Taylor department store. Throughout this coverage, the ABC News Investigative Team worked diligently to fact check every detail in this fast-moving investigation. While other news organizations chose to air photos of two potential suspects early on that would then prove not to be correct or in any way connected to the bombing, ABC News chose accuracy over speed, fact-checking over error, resulting in coverage that broke numerous headlines and provided ABC News viewers and readers with up-to-the-moment details and exclusive investigative insight.
  • Brian Ross Investigates: Al Qaeda in Kentucky

    This exclusive ABC News investigation found that American counterterrorism officials were investigating more than a dozen cases of possible terrorists who have slipped into the U.S. under the refugee program. With rare access inside current and ongoing major terrorism investigations, the in-depth investigative reports broadcast on "Nightline," "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Good Morning America" told the story of how a little noticed arrest of two men in Kentucky led to a major national security investigation that commanded the attention of top officials, including President Obama. The Iraqis were not refugees fleeing persecution, as they had claimed to immigration authorities, but were al Qaeda-iraq terrorists who had targeted U.S. troops in northern Iraq with bombs and sniper attacks. A key piece of evidence was that the fingerprints of one defendant were located on an improvised explosive device stored in a box for six years in an FBI warehouse, which had been found buried in a Baiji, Iraq road by American soldiers in September 2005. Worse, the two Iraqi insurgents, who had lied their way into the U.S. as alleged refugees -- and escaped drawing scrutiny until they were serttled in Kentucky -- were plotting to ship- heavy arms back to Iraq in an FBI sting, and were also discussing U.S. Homeland revenge bombings, the FBI learned. ABC News was able not only to tell the story of this incredible counterterrorism investigation by the FBI with help from the U.S. military, but also connect a specific bombing in Baiji that killed four Pennsylvania National Guardsmen to the Iraqi defendants. The exclusive ABC News investigation, which was broadcast on the network's three major newscasts as well as online with stories and web extra videos, also broke the news of current FBI counterterrorism investigations of suspects inside the U.S. whose fingerprints are being checked with those lifted from devices in evidence at the FBI's secret "bomb library," where ABC News was shown 100,000 IEDs collected from warzones in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere.