Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "boys" ...

  • Years of abuse and neglect kept secret

    News 5 Investigates discovered the Colorado Department of Human Services knew about several cases of abuse and neglect at a facility for teens and young adults with psychiatric and behavioral issues years before the center permanently closed.
  • VTDigger: The flying fraternity

    A six-month investigation by VTDigger uncovered a “good ol’ boys club” at the Vermont National Guard in which male officials receive preferential treatment, break rules and abuse alcohol. We revealed numerous examples of how the Guard has created a toxic environment for women who say they have been sexually harassed and passed up for promotions.
  • Baseball player promoted to varsity after sexually abusing child

    After receiving a tip, WJHL asked a juvenile court judge in Virginia to release court records related to a sex abuse case. They knew they had a shot securing the records after conferring with an open records expert. After all, the records involved serious felonies. The judge released the records after discussing the issue with the Virginia Supreme Court. The records confirmed exactly what we suspected. In the end, the investigation uncovered a legal and school system failure that allowed two baseball players to remain on the team and at school after sexually abusing their 11-year-old neighbor during an off-campus campout. The investigation prompted the court clerk to apologize and the school to take action against the boys.
  • Juvenile Sexual Assaults Victims of Dr. William Ayres: The Forgotten Victims

    For forty years, hundreds of juveniles in San Mateo County, California were sexually assaulted in court-ordered sessions by prominent child psychiatrist Dr. William Ayres. But when the victims spoke out, they were either ignored or punished by authorities. It wasn’t until 2002, when journalist Victoria Balfour contacted police on behalf of one of Ayres’ victims, a private patient, that a criminal case against Ayres began to get traction. In 2013, Ayres, a former President of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, pleaded no contest to molesting boys who had been his private patients. He was sentenced to eight years in prison. However, Balfour had a fierce belief that the voices of his juvenile victims urgently needed to be heard in this case as well. When agencies in San Mateo County whose job it was to protect juveniles rebuffed her request to find the juvenile victims, Balfour embarked on a 3 and-a-half year project to find them herself. Working on a detective's theory that most of Ayres' juvenile victims were now in prison, she wrote to more than 300 inmates from San Mateo County and asked if they had been evaluated by Ayres. Balfour’s article recounts the horrifying and heartbreaking responses she received from inmates about their abuse by Dr. Ayres, one of the most prolific child molesters in recent California history.
  • Child Castaways A CNN Freedom Project Documentary

    Nima Elbagir and her team spent almost nine months investigating the illegal Mediterranean crossing undertaken by Egyptian boys in search of a better life for their families. Some of these minors end up in the care of the Italian state, while others work for the very gangs who smuggled them, making money on the streets of Rome, selling whatever they can - including themselves. https://vimeo.com/151949090
  • Laurel Prep Academy

    Adults squabbling over money, power and basketball…all while the kids they claim to be helping lose out. Our year and a half investigation into the Laurel Prep Academy and its parent organization the Laurel Boys and Girls Club prompted the state board of education to shut down the school, the state comptroller to launch an investigation, the city to hold emergency hearings and the club to fire its leadership and replace its entire board of directors.
  • The News Sorority: Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, Christiane Amanpour—and the (Ongoing, Imperfect, Complicated) Triumph of Women in TV News

    For decades, women battered the walls of the male fortress of television journalism. After fierce struggles, three women—Diane Sawyer, Katie Couric, and Christiane Amanpour—broke into the newsroom’s once impenetrable “boys’ club.” These extraordinary women were not simply pathbreakers, but wildly gifted journalists whose unique talents—courage and empathy, competitive drive and strategic poise—enabled them to climb to the top of the corporate ladder and transform the way Americans received their news. Drawing on exclusive interviews with their colleagues and intimates from childhood on, The News Sorority crafts a lively and exhilarating narrative that reveals the hard struggles and inner strengths that shaped these women and powered their success.
  • Nightmare in Maryville

    Although two girls, 13 and 14 years old, alleged rape in January 2012 by older boys in Maryville, Mo., felony charges were dropped for murky reasons -- despite the sheriff's insistence that a crime was committed. After The Kansas City Star documented the nightmare of bullying and harassment that followed for a victim's family, including the burning of a house, the story exploded around the globe. As a result of the outrage, the case was revived by a special prosecutor, who secured a misdemeanor guilty plea, as well as an apology by the then high school senior. Whether that brings closure to the now 16-year-old victim is unclear. The Star reported her series of suicide attempts stemming from her continued harassment. Her latest attempt left her in the hospital. The modicum of justice was finally served in January 2013, two years after she was found dumped semi-conscious in freezing weather on her doorstep.
  • A Vicious Cycle: Broken Homes, Deadly Streets, Shattered Lives.

    The 54 minute documentary “A Vicious Cycle” is a groundbreaking and deeply personal look at the causes and impact of violent crime in the St. Louis area, which includes East St. Louis and Washington Park, Illinois, the communities with the highest murder rates in America. The documentary is the result of five months of investigation and interviews with victims, their families, former gang leaders, police, and social workers. The program is divided into four segments; (1) overview with victims and a deep look at causes of violent crime, (2) unprecedented access with one St. Louis family with 2 sons behind bars and the father of 1 son also in prison, (3) an inside look at how police are fighting crime, (4) and the emotional ending focusing on social programs that successfully bring broken families together. In 2011, there were 11 murders in Washington Park, Illinois, 1 for every 370 residents, which is 8 times the murder rate of St. Louis, a city that has one of the highest murder rates in the country. We explore the many contributing factors in the region's most violent neighborhoods, including extreme poverty, lower levels of education and home ownership, single parent families and segregation. We also examine the life of a former gang leader who was arrested more than 40 times, including arrests for 2 murders. A unique part of our program is a deeply personal investigation of the destruction of one St. Louis family. That segment, part two of our program, is 13 minutes long. The mother agreed to talk about her family because of the “pull of the streets” that lured all 3 of her sons into a gang. Our investigation learned that it was the collapse of the family, particularly their mother’s mental problems and substance abuse that really pushed the boys into the streets to find more structure and a sense of family. What follows is a rare look inside a family in crisis, featuring on-camera interviews behind bars with two sons and the father. One son is mentally ill, suicidal and has 7 children. During the interviews we learn that the root of the family’s collapse was the mother’s repeated abuse and neglect when she was a young child. The segment also includes interviews with the victims of other son’s violent crimes, including a murder he committed when he was just 19.
  • Outside the Lines: Cowboys Clothing Controversy

    Last year, the Dallas Cowboys ranked third in the NFL in merchandise sales, and three years ago their operation generated more than $90 million. But virtually none of the shirts, jerseys and jackets made for "America's Team" is made in America. Instead, Cowboys merchandise is produced all over the world, and in some cases, in factories that are considered sweatshops, where workers make 29 cents per hour. Currently, claims of labor rights violations, such as mandatory overtime and unfair pay, are coming from workers in some overseas factories that produce Cowboys' apparel. Outside the Lines traveled to Cambodia to visit two of those factories.