Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "brazil" ...

  • Bribery Division

    The Bribery Division, an international investigation into Latin America’s largest construction company, reveals fresh evidence of hundreds of millions of dollars in suspicious payments linked to major infrastructure projects. Brazilian multinational Odebrecht has been implicated in a cash-for-contracts scandal that the U.S. Department of Justice has described as “the largest foreign bribery case in history.” The Bribery Division investigation unveils dramatic new information in taking readers inside the belly of the beast: Odebrecht’s Division of Structured Operations, a specialized unit created for the primary purpose of managing the company’s graft. A team of more than 50 journalists across the Americas, led by ICIJ, examined more than 13,000 Odebrecht documents from a secret communication platform used by the Structured Operations unit. The team’s sprawling expose revealed Odebrecht’s cash-for-contracts operation was even bigger than the company had acknowledged to prosecutors and had involved prominent figures and massive public works projects not mentioned in the criminal cases or other official inquiries to date.
  • How a donkey became one of the best mayors in Brazil

    The report revealed an industry of awards for politicians in Brazil. The certificates are granted against sums of money paid cash, usually upon a fake opinion poll in which these politicians are supposedly recognized by the population.
  • Chapecoense: The dark aspects of the catastrophe

    An aircraft belonging to the Bolivian company LaMia crashed into a mountain in the Department of Antioquia, Colombia, on Nov. 28, 2016, killing 71 and injuring 6 with varying degrees of severity. Almost the entire Brazilian soccer team Asociación Chapecoense de Fútbol died in the greatest aviation tragedy in the history of this sport. This is the starting point for the documentary “Chapecoense: The dark keys of the catastrophe,” a production by CNN en Español in which a team of journalists conducted a thorough investigation that spanned more than a year and 10 countries.
  • Fugitive Fathers

    The Catholic Church has allowed priests accused of sexually abusing children in the United States and Europe to relocate to poor parishes in South America, a year-long GlobalPost investigation has found. GlobalPost Senior Correspondent Will Carless and videographer Jimmy Chalk confronted five accused priests. One who relocated to a poor parish in Peru admitted on camera to molesting a 13-year-old boy while working in the Jackson, Mississippi diocese. Another is currently under investigation in Brazil after allegations arose that he abused disadvantaged children living in an orphanage he founded there. All five were able to continue working as priests, despite criminal investigations or cash payouts to alleged victims. All enjoyed the privilege, respect and unfettered access to young people that comes with being clergy members. http://www.globalpost.com/article/6677019/2015/10/28/priest-almost-got-away http://www.globalpost.com/article/6655538/2015/09/23/could-vatican-face-racketeering-charges-harboring-abusive-clergy http://www.globalpost.com/article/6649057/2015/09/14/fugitive-fathers http://www.globalpost.com/article/6669574/2015/10/15/fugitive-fathers-two-priests-have-been-suspended-globalposts http://www.globalpost.com/article/6653949/2015/09/21/survivor-advocates-critique-pope-francis-lack-real-progress-priest-sex http://www.globalpost.com/article/6649016/2015/09/14/us-priests-accused-child-sex-abuse-find-refuge-south-american-churches http://www.globalpost.com/article/6663599/2015/10/06/explainer-how-abusive-priests-are-able-relocate-abroad http://www.globalpost.com/article/6650841/2015/09/16/us-priests-accused-sex-abusive-get-second-chance-relocating-south-america
  • The Surgeons's Mafia

    The report cast light over the underworld of prosthesis surgeries in Brazil. During four months, news reporter Giovani Grizotti disguise as a physician to catch companies that offer bribes to surgeons. The proposition was to practice unnecessary surgeries and to use overvalued prosthesis in patients.
  • Green Going Gone: The Tragic Deforestation of the Chaco

    This corporate accountability story combined original satellite analysis with traditional on-the-ground investigative reporting to examine links between deforestation and the world’s largest agricultural commodities traders: The U.S.-based Cargill, Bunge and ADM. The story paid special attention to Cargill, North America’s largest private corporation and the commodities trader that has spent millions on its corporate sustainability program and aggressively promotes itself as a nature conservationist. Reported from Paraguay, the story compared the Big Ag traders’ soybean export operations in Paraguay with those in Brazil, where the three companies have won praise for upholding the Soy Moratorium, a voluntary ban on expanding the Amazon’s soybean frontier. The Moratorium is widely credited with slowing rainforest clearing in Brazil over the last eight years. In neighboring Paraguay during roughly the same timeframe, however, the country’s soybean cropland has expanded by nearly one-third with an additional 2.5 million acres brought into cultivation. This rapid expansion has set off a land rush that is, among other things, propelling the rapid disappearance of South America’s second most bio-diverse forests, the Gran Chaco.
  • The Price of Glory

    Days after the completion of the 2014 World Cup in Brazil, HBO’s “Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel” looked ahead and across the world to Qatar — the tiny desert sheikhdom that had improbably won the right to host the 2022 World Cup. The “Real Sports” report told the story of how this largely obscure but wildly-rich nation – the wealthiest per capita on earth – had embarked on a plan to put itself on the map through sports. But they would make that march to glory at seemingly any cost – be it fair play, human rights, or even human lives. Blessed with the largest deposits of liquefied natural gas in the world, Qatar has developed a national sports plan like the world has never seen.
  • Always Open

    The report on the prison Viamão - shows the lack in the prison system of Rio Grande do Sul and Brazil. Recordings made by a prison guard last year , reveal that inmates leave prison and enter the house anytime you want . Blatant still shows the armed power of the criminal - that should be confined in the cells leaving only with legal authorization to work . They boast pistols, revolvers and submachine up.
  • The Battle of Belo Monte

    In the Brazilian state of Pará, an army of 25,000 workers is building the world’s third largest hydroelectric plant, a controversial construction project –because of the dam’s low efficiency, its environmental impact and its effects on the Indians, riverbank-dwellers and the inhabitants of Altamira. Folha’s reporters spent three weeks in the region to put together the most comprehensive coverage –with 24 videos, 55 pictures, and 18 infographics– of the country’s largest infrastructural investment. The pros and cons of the dam are presented in five chapters: Construction; Environment; Society; Indigenous Peoples; History.
  • Invasion of Privacy

    The report showed the extension to which confidential information of Brazilians is unprotected. It showed sales of passwords for the access to the police database, trade of confidential information from the IRS, and negotiations involving private telephone information. Pretending to be another person, the reporter was able to buy even his own private telephone information on the black market, including all the calls he had made and received within 30 days.