Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "breach" ...

  • North Bay Bohemian: Sonoma Trifecta

    The three interlocking stories uncovered a real estate investor-banking-media network that illuminates the shape of Sonoma County’s “shadow” government. A development partnership angling for a county contract includes a county official who partners with a banker who flaunts ethics regulations in a fire disaster rebuild area. An owner of a major local newspaper is a board member of the bank which receives favorable press coverage in the newspaper for its fire deals that do not disclose the ownership connection. Another owner of the newspaper, a real estate investor and political consultant, is found to have defrauded a local Indian tribe in a real estate deal and in cahoots with the son of a U.S. Senator. As we go to press, the newspaper fails to report on the fraud when confronted with the relevant court documents, publishing only a 900 word story on a “dispute” that our 3,500 story unveils as fraud and breach of contract. The need for surviving alt-weeklies to keep publishing hard-hitting LOCAL investigative journalism is reaffirmed.
  • The University of Louisville Foundation Bought An Empty Factory In Oklahoma—Because A Donor Asked

    Reporter Kate Howard revealed how the University of Louisville’s nonprofit fundraising arm bought an abandoned factory in Oklahoma at the behest of a major donor. The multi-layered $3.47 million-dollar transaction had no academic purpose, did not result in any revenue for the organization and appeared to be an ethical breach and tax code violation.
  • Perimeter breaches at US airports

    People get onto tarmacs and even planes at major airports far more often than the general public or elected officials realize; more than 250 times in recent years. Until AP’s story, the breaches had been largely secret. The public had no idea that, for example, one mentally ill man had hopped the fence at LAX eight times, twice reaching stairs that led to jets. Associated Press reporters painstakingly filed public records requests and legal actions to produce the most comprehensive public accounting of perimeter security breaches at top U.S. airports. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2YeqYfYB0s
  • Public Money, Private Profits

    David Sirota's run of coverage in the International Business Times lays bare how hedge funds, private equity investors and other professional money managers have penetrated an enormous and lucrative frontier – the roughly $3 trillion worth of public pension systems run by cities and states. The deal-making that has delivered this state of affairs has been laced with conflicts of interest and ethics breaches. Sirota produced a blockbuster scoop showing how the head of New Jersey’s pension system, the former private equity executive Robert Grady, had been in direct contact with top political staff working for the reelection of Gov. Chris Christie just as major campaign contributions were pouring into Christie’s coffers from financial services companies with contracts to manage state pension funds – an apparent violation of state and federal pay-to-play laws.
  • Privacy on the Line

    “Privacy on the Line” documented security breaches and fraud in the implementation of a $2 billion federal phone subsidy for low-income families. We found tens of thousands of applicants to Lifeline, were put at heightened risk for identity theft when more than 170,000 sensitive records were posted publicly online. While researching companies participating in the Lifeline program, Scripps investigative reporter Isaac Wolf discovered a data breach touching residents of 26 states.
  • Police Misconduct on Long Island hidden by secrecy law and weak oversight

    A nine-month Newsday investigation found that Long Island law enforcement agencies have breached the trust of the citizens they are paid to protect by using New York State’s officer privacy law to hide egregious cases of police misconduct, ranging from falsifying reports and lying to shooting innocent people. Newsday obtained and published portions of previously secret internal affairs investigations, confidential deadly force investigative reports and more than 6 hours of recorded Internal Affairs interviews. The paper’s effort revealed dozens of previously secret misconduct cases and informed the public of the law that helps keep those records hidden from inspection. Without Newsday, the public might never have learned the scope and breadth of offenses being committed in secret by the officers sworn to protect them.
  • Katrina Justice-A Preventable Disaster

    Geologists and Engineers had been warning for decades that the City of New Orleans was poised to be devastated in case of a major flood, and those warnings were largely ignored for those same decades, until Hurricane Katrina proved the dire predictions were true. Today the INSIDER EXCLUSIVE “Goes Behind The Headlines” in KATRINA JUSTICE – A Preventable Disaster ….. to examine how Joe Bruno, Managing Partner of Bruno & Bruno …..who serves as the Court Appointed Liaison Counsel for the Katrina Canal Breaches Consolidated Litigation and Scott Joanen, one of the many lawyers on his team have led the efforts on behalf of the citizens and residents of New Orleans who suffered catastrophic losses due to the gross negligence of the United States Army Corps of Engineers which caused the flooding of New Orleans.
  • Platts: The Ugly Side of the U.S. Oil and Gas Boom

    There is a nasty and ugly side to the oil and natural gas boom that the U.S. has enjoyed in recent years — a side that involves allegations of fraud, breach of contract and taking advantage of poor or unsophisticated landowners, among other things. This story is significant because these incidents are seldom reported, as the landowners, energy companies and other stakeholders have little to gain and a lot to lose by talking to journalists. But I managed to pull back the curtain on these little-known conflicts by piecing together court files and by interviewing key players, including a woman who could have been sued for “commercial defamation” for talking to me. Through these hard-to-get interviews and court documents, my story paints a colorful and sometimes disturbing portrait of the growing number of conflicts between landowners and the oil and natural gas companies that drill on their lands.
  • The Puddingstone Group

    The Puddingstone Group is a real estate investment company started in 1999 by a judge, a banker, and a real estate developer, which has become involved in dozens of lawsuits arising from alleged predatory practices, breaches of legal ethics, campaign contributions, and collusion with businesses, banks, and politicians.
  • Breach of Faith

    The investigation revealed extensive corruption in the city of Bell, California. The city's chief administrative officer was receiving a total compensation of $1.5 million -- probably the highest pay for that job anywhere in the country. The assistant city manager, police chief, and part-time council members had exorbitant salaries as well. The city was also illegally raising taxes and giving police daily impound quotas to boost revenue.