Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "bureaucracy" ...

  • Holding the Pentagon Accountable

    In 2016, Washington Post reporter Craig Whitlock surmounted the Pentagon's Byzantine bureaucracy and near-epidimic secrecy to reveal epic examples of military corruption and waste. Drawing on years of Pentagon beat reporting experience and deft use of the Freedom of Information Act, Whitlock exposed several scandals that defense officials fought to conceal from the public.
  • FUELING THE FIRE

    Buried beneath a mix of federal bureaucracy and ambivalence is a story that explains why thousands of helicopters in use today remain vulnerable to the very same problem that doomed a Flight for Life crew in Frisco, Colorado, earlier this year. For five months, 9Wants to Know analyzed hundreds of NTSB accident reports in an effort to better understand what’s “fueling the fire.” Based heavily upon a combination of interviews with victims and researchers, our conclusions have generated interest within the aviation industry and Congress, and will form the basis of a national discussion that is finally underway. https://vimeo.com/151435468 https://vimeo.com/149457398
  • The CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley: Bringing Home America’s Fallen Correspondent: Chip Rei

    Four-story series on waste and mismanagement within the Pentagon agencies responsible for bringing home the remains of 83,000 US military personnel who never returned from battle. Despite a budget of more than $100 million, the series revealed the POW/MIA Accounting Community, as it is officially known, has a very poor record of repatriating and identifying remains. In fact, the Pentagon’s results were eclipsed by those of a non-profit charity whose work we carefully documented. Two days after our first story ran, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered a thorough review of the sprawling Pentagon bureaucracy. The CBS reporters followed up with another story when Hagel ordered a massive reorganization. The story included interviews with family members who endured years of agony while they pleaded for answers from the Pentagon. CBS also reported on a highly critical DoD Inspector General’s report months before it was officially released. The fourth story in the series tracked the work of History Flight, a charity that has successfully recovered WWII remains on the Pacific Island of Tarawa. CBS reporters traveled to Tarawa with six US Marines, now in their 90s, on their first return visit since they fought there in 1943. The series documented the emotional scene as they witnessed History Flight’s painstaking recovery of their fellow Marines. http://vimeo.com/cbseveningnews/review/115438489/56d862cc1e
  • Dying for Care

    Handing off Florida prison inmate care to for-profit health companies was designed to deliver millions in taxpayer savings beginning in 2012. But for inmates, it came with cold-blooded consequences, a six-month Palm Beach Post investigation found: soaring fatalities, brutally indifferent medical treatment and a corrections bureaucracy and billion-dollar corporation which withheld crucial data on inmate deaths and negligent care.
  • Adoption Subsidy

    Because of a confusing tangle of bureaucratic rules, adoptive parents in New York City continue to receive monthly government subsidies even after sending their adopted children back to foster care or kicking them out onto the street. The subsidy is meant to encourage parents to adopt "hard-to-place" children out of foster care and to provide for the children’s care. But in the event that an adoption does not work out, the city’s children services agency will not cut off the subsidy even when it learns that the parents are no longer caring for their kids, blaming restrictive state and federal rules for its inability to act. This means, as one NYC Family Court judge said, that a child in foster care “would not have enough money for a winter coat while their parents were getting a thousand dollars a month from the city.”
  • Fatally Flawed

    A five-part series by The Charlotte Observer revealed that the officials assigned to investigate suspicious deaths routinely fail to follow crucial steps, raising questions about the accuracy of thousands of rulings. The effects of a botched investigation on surviving family members can be devastating. Killers can go free. Widows can be cheated out of the life insurance payments they deserve. In some cases, reporters found, grieving relatives were forced to launch their own inquiries into how a loved one died. Compiling the report wasn’t easy. Observer reporters first requested the state’s database of suspicious deaths in early 2012. For 18 months, the state stalled and provided incomplete data. In the summer of 2013, the Observer threatened legal action. Only then did the N.C. Office of the Chief Medical Examiner turn over its complete database.
  • Presidential Pardons: Shades of Mercy

    The investigation exposed a system in which race, privledge and bureaucracy combine to frustrate justice. The story takes the reader inside the Justice Department's Office of the Pardon Attorney where a small group of career prosecutors choose whom the president will consider for a pardon.
  • Crooked Teeth

    The WFAA-TV investigative series, "Crooked Teeth," reveals a troubling lack of state and federal oversight of the Texas Medicaid orthodontic program, which is designed to help poor children with severely misaligned teeth. The lack of oversight has allowed Texas dentists and their corporations to exploit the health care bureaucracy and garner hundreds of millions of dollars. "Crooked Teeth" also raises questions about other Medicaid reimbursements nationally, including troubling payment policies by one of the nation's largest government contractors.
  • Special Care, Unknown Costs

    The series took gave readers a look inside New Jersey's special education system. It's findings show how there is no one held accountable when students in the system fall through the cracks.
  • "FEMA's Toxic Bureaucracy"

    After nearly a year of reporting, the CBS News Investigative Unit reported a string of "discrimination, sexual harassment and cronyism in the New Orleans" FEMA office. Several staff members went on camera to share stories revealing the "toxic environment" of the FEMA office. Just a day after the story aired, an internal investigation was launched by FEMA, and the Chief of Staff was quickly transferred.