Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "cancer" ...

  • Toxic Legacy Sites in New York State

    Three stories focused on the toxic pollution that still lies underneath the surface -- long forgotten but still potentially harmful.
  • Santa Fe New Mexican and ProPublica: Half-life

    The series Half-life, a partnership between the Santa Fe New Mexican and ProPublica, explored health and safety conditions for nuclear workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The says it has complied with federal workers’ safety rules since the mid-1990s, but The New Mexican and ProPublica found thousands of lab workers have filed benefits claims for cancer, and hundreds more have died, as a result of work done in the last two decades — a generation in which nuclear work conditions were supposed to be safe. Reporting found these workers face steep hurdles and are more frequently denied benefits than older generations. The Department of Energy has also rarely held Los Alamos contractors accountable for safety issues and has taken steps to limit independent oversight of safety conditions at federal nuclear sites nationwide.
  • NYT: Cashing in On Cancer

    Conflicts riddle Memorial Sloan Kettering. Top doctors and executives benefit from lucrative side deals. Its staff feels betrayed, its mission is tainted.
  • CBS News: Healthcare Fraud in America

    For the past four years, CBS News has been committed to investigating healthcare fraud throughout the United States. Our reporting has uncovered schemes preying on veterans, cancer patients, rural communities, and opioid addicts. We’ve been the only network to expose con artists defrauding billions from private insurance companies, Medicare and even Tricare, a component of the military health system. In 2016 we produced an investigative series that found compounding pharmacies were collecting prescriptions for pain creams and billing insurance more than $1 million per week. Last year, our reporting revealed an insurance scheme involving genetic testing that cost the Pentagon trillions. This year’s entries continue our work to expose unscrupulous actors bilking insurance to cash in on the American healthcare system. Our stories go beyond examining the fiscal toll of insurance fraud, they illustrate the human impact these practices have on communities, families, and individuals.
  • Waycross Cancers

    A spike in childhood cancers in Waycross, Georgia causes this small town to wrestle with questions about the causes of cancer, whether their community is safe, whether they should trust the government agencies that are supposed to protect them.
  • America’s atomic vets: ‘We were used as guinea pigs – every one of us’

    Atomic veterans feel abused, neglected and forgotten by the government and a country that exposed them to unforeseen risks. In the decades since the nuclear tests, many have suffered ailments such as cancer and blame the radiation. https://www.retroreport.org/video/atomic-vets/ https://www.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=4481099eafd746ff8e79bb13a6596e79
  • Wrongful State Firings

    Arizona Republic senior reporter Craig Harris spent much of 2016 investigating wrongful firings of state employees, including a juvenile corrections teacher who was fighting breast cancer. His dogged reporting resulted in 47 public employees wrongly fired getting their jobs back and new job protections for state workers.
  • Toxic Safety

    A child’s car seat is the only consumer product that is required by law in all 50 states and it is crucial to keep a child safe in the car. However, this investigation revealed false advertising, legal loopholes and outdated federal regulations are exposing millions of children to concerning, even known-cancer-causing chemicals, in their car seats with no apparent safety benefit. Over the course of a year, KPIX lit car seats on fire, commissioned lab tests on car seats and the kids who use them, searched public records, mined social media, analyzed national car fire data and interviewed experts from every applicable industry. The resulting series sparked action by lawmakers, industry groups, consumer advocates, federal regulators and car seat
  • Wrongful State Firings

    Arizona Republic senior reporter Craig Harris spent much of 2016 investigating wrongful firings of state employees, including a juvenile corrections teacher who was fighting breast cancer. His dogged reporting resulted in 47 public employees wrongly fired getting their jobs back and new job protections for state workers. http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/09/08/gov-doug-ducey-forces-out-juvenile-corrections-chief-dona-markley-after-questionable-firings/90094760/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/10/31/fired-arizona-workers-inundate-call-center-appealing-get-jobs-back/93083666/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/11/23/gov-doug-ducey-fires-arizona-des-chief-tim-jeffries/94350606/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/12/23/arizona-rehire-40-des-workers-227-remain-fired/95795356/
  • Derby Pain Clinic's High Prescribing Of Cancer Drug Extends Beyond Nurse

    Culling and analyzing newly released data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, C-HIT Senior Writer Lisa Chedekel found an interesting prescribing pattern: four nurse practitioners, all affiliated with a tiny Derby pain clinic, prescribed nearly all of the state's Medicare spending for the opioid painkiller Subsys. The nurses were responsible for 279 prescriptions for Subsys, at a cost of $2.3 million in 2014. Nationally, only 10 nurse practitioners prescribed Subsys - with the majority of prescriptions written by doctors.