Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "casino" ...

  • WSJ: The Fall of Steve Wynn

    Steve Wynn, the powerful casino executive considered the creator of modern Las Vegas, was responsible for a decadeslong pattern of sexual misconduct and harassment toward employees.
  • Hong Kong's back-room bookies go global thanks to online betting

    The South China Morning Post built on a court case in Las Vegas to document how figures linked to Hong Kong's organised crime world have moved from hosting VIPs in Macau's casinos to running online gambling websites, an unregulated industry in Asia used for massive laundering of crime proceeds. They worked with reporters in the US, Montenegro, Singapore, Germany, Costa Rica, Italy, Malaysia, Thailand and Spain to document a key figure's global footprint. The Las Vegas court case allowed us to do documents-based investigative reporting on triad societies probably for the first time since the territory's return to China.
  • Unfulfilled Promise

    When the NextGen Aviation Research and Technology Park was first announced in 2005, it brought with it hopes for diversifying Atlantic City region's casino dependent economy with the promise of 2,000 high-paying engineering jobs. The series of stories produced by The Press of Atlantic City showed that the project's expectations had been grossly overstated and several opportunities for progress were squandered while political interests kept the project afloat. Subsequent investigations revealed that a quasi-governmental agency at the forefront of the project had fallen into significant debt and stopped completing audits. Meanwhile, the agency's leader continued to receive significant raises without required board approval.
  • NextGen Aviation Research

    When the NextGen Aviation Research and Technology Park was first announced in 2005, it brought with it hopes for diversifying Atlantic City region's casino dependent economy with the promise of 2,000 high-paying engineering jobs. The series of stories produced by The Press of Atlantic City showed that the project's expectations had been grossly overstated and several opportunities for progress were squandered while political interests kept the project afloat. Subsequent investigations revealed that a quasi-governmental agency at the forefront of the project had fallen into significant debt and stopped completing audits. Meanwhile, the agency's leader continued to receive significant raises without required board approval.
  • Breakdown

    In a series of articles entitled “Breakdown,” The Times used the full gamut of multimedia tools to document how bigger purses, swelled by casino money, had corrupted the track. The money encouraged trainers to rely on pain medicine and race thousands of tired, injured and unfit horses, often with catastrophic results. Within days of The Times’s first article, the Jockey Club, the most influential industry group, proposed a nationwide ban on the use of drugs on race days and stiffer penalties, including lifetime bans for repeat offenders. “The status quo had been very much in evidence prior to the New York Times story — after which all hell broke loose,” wrote Barry Irwin, a prominent horse owner, breeder and Kentucky Derby winner. Beyond cataloging carnage on the track, The Times found 3,800 cases of trainers illegally drugging horses since 2009, mostly to enhance performance or mask injuries. Meanwhile, equine veterinarians — who bear the greatest responsibility for protecting the health of a horse — abandoned their oath by reaping profits from drugs they prescribed and by routinely turning medical decisions over to unqualified trainers whose primary goal was to win races.
  • Will "The Winner" Rogers

    Years before Chip Rogers became majority leader in the Georgia Senate, the rising Republican star was known as “Will ‘The Winner’” Rogers, advising callers for a fee how to bet against the pointspread on pro and college football. My nine-month investigation – a collaboration between Atlanta Unfiltered and The News Enterprise, a student reporting initiative of Emory College’s Journalism Program – reveals how Rogers got started in the industry and how he met the gambling industry entrepreneur who would take a $2.2 million eyesore off his hands two decades later. While Rogers says today that he was nothing more than on-air “talent” reading a script for a client, my follow-up stories show that while serving as a freshman legislator, Rogers regularly oversaw production of promotional mailings that advertised over-the-phone sports handicapping services and an offshore casino.
  • KMOV: Welfare Withdrawal Fraud

    Thousands of Missouri tax dollars spent in casinos, strip clubs, and bars.These are Missouri welfare cards being accessed for cash at ATMs in some bizarre places. The state can’t tell you how nearly $100 million of your tax dollars are actually spent because what’s purchased with that cash isn’t tracked, but the ATM locations are recorded. News 4 spent the last two years digging into this issue and continues to find plenty of red flags.
  • War Zone: The Destruction of an All-American City

    The hour-long documentary War Zone: The Destruction of an All-American City takes an unprecedented look at the impact of corruption on the East St. Louis, Illinois area, one of the poorest and most violent communities in America. The program was broadcast twice during prime time; Tuesday night at 8 pm on August 28, and the following Saturday night at 7 pm. This project was the result of an ongoing decade-long probe of government waste, corruption, police misconduct, and violence in East St. Louis and the surrounding villages by investigative reporter Craig Cheatham. Our documentary begins with a detailed look at police misconduct and corruption, how it has contributed to the breakdown of public safety in the East St. Louis area, and why local politicians tolerated such outrageous behavior by their officers. The second part of our documentary focuses on the impact of derelict and vacant housing, the slumlords who own the property and the people who live in some of the worst housing in the metro area. Our investigation also uncovered new connections between politicians and legendary slumlord Ed Sieron, who was business partners with a longtime mayor. In addition, KMOV revealed that of the 500 mostly rundown properties that Sieron owns in East St. Louis, only 13 were cited for code violations. That lack of accountability for the notorious slumlord, empowered him and made the people living in his homes feel powerless. War Zone also exposes the way East St. Louis communities have sold their economy to vice-driven businesses like strip clubs, liquor stores, a casino, and convenience marts that had a long history of selling illegal synthetic drugs. Our investigation found that nearly all of these businesses failed to employ a significant number of East St. Louis residents, even though they received millions of dollars in tax incentives that are paid by East St. Louis residents. At the same time East St. Louis is handing out tax breaks to wealthy out-of-town businessmen, it repeatedly refused to provide the same tax incentives for local residents who wanted to create family friendly businesses that would employ people living in the East St. Louis area.
  • Native Americans Tribues Shield Parents from Child Support

    Many mothers in California, and around the country, can't get child support payments from Native American fathers or tribal casino employees. That's because tribes are sovereign nations and don't have to honor state or federal child support orders. Without the child support payments, many of the mothers survive on food stamps and welfare.
  • Welfare Waste

    An ongoing KSTP-TV investigation, led by reporter Mark Albert, has examined waste and the potential for fraud in Minnesota's public assistance programs, including free-wheeling rules that allowed welfare to be used for tattoos and liquor, withdrawn at ATMs inside casinos and bingo halls and a systematic lack of oversight in state-funded child care that can lead to millions of dollars in payments every year to families and providers that do not qualify.