Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "castro" ...

  • Mafia Spies: The Inside Story of the CIA, Gangster, JFK and Castro

    MAFIA SPIES tells the story of America’s first known attempt at state-sanctioned assassination: how the CIA recruited two top gangsters, Sam Giancana and Johnny Roselli, in a plot to kill Cuban leader Fidel Castro during the Cold War. Using recently declassified documents, MAFIA SPIES reveals many details about the US clandestine military effort from a hidden CIA base in Florida to get rid of Castro and, even more remarkably, how Castro managed to avoid getting killed with the help of a Soviet-trained Cuban spy network and double agents placed in Florida. Using FBI and police records, MAFIA SPIES also points to mobster Santo Trafficante as the likely mastermind in the unsolved murders of Giancana and Roselli, as the proverbial “last one standing” in this complex spy tale.
  • Plundering America: The Cuban Criminal Pipeline

    Congress granted unique immigration status to Cubans more than five decades ago, intending to help them escape Fidel Castro and find refuge in America. A yearlong Sun Sentinel investigation documented how criminals have exploited that special treatment, triggering Congressional hearings, a national discussion and a bill to eliminate the 50-year-old Cuban Adjustment Act. http://interactive.sun-sentinel.com/plundering-america/
  • Understaffed and Underserved

    "Understaffed and Underserved: A Look Inside America’s Nursing Homes" exposed staffing discrepancies, racial disparities and billions of dollars in questionable HUD-backed mortgages granted to facilities across the country, revealing the intersection of nursing home companies’ profit-driven practices with weak governmental oversight that all too often leads to devastating, and even fatal, consequences for some of the nation’s most vulnerable citizens. The project generated widespread media pickup, resulted in the filing of federal legislation, the GAO saying it would investigate the five-star rating system and contributed to federal policy change by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Advocates throughout the nation used data from the project to advocate for legislative change, while a law professor had her students do field testing for a potential civil rights law suit and plans to request HUD Secretary Julian Castro to initiate a complaint against a Chicago-area nursing home chain.
  • Cuba Twitter

    To the annals of American subterfuge in Fidel and Raul Castro’s Cuba, The Associated Press revealed a new and astonishing case: the curious story of a fake “Cuban Twitter.” The idea was to create a cellphone text messaging service to provoke unrest and undermine Cuba’s communist government. It was hatched in 2010 by the U.S. Agency for International Development, an agency best known for distributing billions of dollars in humanitarian aid. This package not only details the "Cuban Twitter" program, but describes other covert operations run out of USAID over the past year.
  • Suspect City: Stop & Frisk in Miami Gardens

    Fusion’s investigative team spent six-months producing a fully digital, data-driven interactive story about a police department in Florida with a “stop and frisk” policy that may be unparalleled in the nation. One local public defender called it “stop and frisk on steroids.” Fusion analyzed more than 30,000 pages of police department data, showing how aggressive and far-reaching police actions were. Some residents were stopped, questioned and written up multiple times within minutes of each other, by different officers. Children were stopped by police in playgrounds. Senior citizens were stopped and questioned near their retirement home, including a 99-year-old man deemed to be "suspicious.” Officers even wrote a report identifying a five-year-old child as a "suspicious person.” Fusion also documented multiple instances of police officers falsifying reports, claiming to stop and question people who were actually already in county jail.
  • "Tainted Water"

    For more than 20 years, the harmful chemical perchlorate has seeped into San Bernardino County's groundwater. The seep is thought to have started at a local dump site; however, records about the site were lost in the late 1980s by "two state regulatory agencies." The problem wasn't reported again until 1997, but warnings were "dismissed" by the county. The site was "rediscovered" in 2001, but it wasn't until 2009 that the county got serious about stopping the chemical seep. It is estimated that the cleanup operation will be completed by 2013.
  • "Stimulus Accountability"

    The AP examines "how and where" the money from President Obama's economic stimulus bill is being spent. The series reveals the federal money isn't being allocated in quite the way it was expected and that some of the nation's most financially deprived communities are being missed.
  • Twilight of The Assassins

    "The first act of airline terrorism in the Americas was not 9/11 but thrity years ago, when seventy-three people died in the mid air bombing of a Cuban passengers plane. Now, one of the alleged masterminds lives freely in Miami, while another awaits trialon other charges in Texas. For decades, Fidel Castro (and later jaoined by Hugo Chavez) insisted that the CIA was ehind the bombing. However, the Bush administration has been loathe to release its 30 years of CIA and FBI files to finally resolve enduring suspicions.
  • Finding Manana: A Memoir of a Cuban Exodus

    Ojito relates her story of growing up in Cuba in the 1960's-70's, under Fidel Castro's government, and leaving Cuba in the 1980 Mariel boatlift when she was 16. She tells how the role of ordinary people in the boatlift managed to change the history of Cuba, South Florida and the U.S., as, she claims, President Carter partly lost the reelection because of the boatlift. She tells how although the White House attempted to deter the boatlift, Cubans came together to flee Cuba and arrive in Key West.
  • Cuba: An Elusive Truth

    This story is a ten month, in depth investigation of Cuba. The students completed hundreds of interviews to synthesize three distinct perspective: those of the Miami exiled community, the Cuban government and the Cuban people. The students found that there is no absolute truth about the country; the embargoes, government programs, media, and tourism all have both positive and negative consequences for the country. The story has been nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for international journalism.