Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "civilians" ...

  • KPCC: Repeat

    KPCC’s “Repeat” is a serialized podcast that shows how one of the largest law enforcement agencies in the country, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, investigates officers who shoot civilians. We found a system that is largely shielded from public scrutiny and raised questions about the secrecy of internal investigations.
  • Detroit Free Press: They look like cops, but they're not

    A Detroit Free Press investigation found that police agencies across Michigan are supplementing their ranks with unlicensed civilians, commonly called reserve officers, who wear uniforms and badges and carry guns. But these volunteers are unregulated and not subject to state-established training standards, despite frequently assisting real cops on patrol and, sometimes, with arrests. No one had ever tallied the number of reserve officers in Michigan, so the Free Press did and uncovered a staggering number, and many who had committed crimes and other misdeeds.
  • 60 Minutes: War Crime

    60 MINUTES has obtained rare video of a 2017 sarin gas attack on Syrian civilians that drew a 59-missile response by the U.S. military last year. The disturbing high definition video, shown publically for the first time, exposes the horrors of these internationally banned weapons, that the Syrian Dictator Bashar al-Assad continues to use to massacre his own people.
  • A Crime Against Humanity

    Scott Pelley reports on the 2013 nerve gas attack in Syria that U.S. authorities estimate killed over 1,400 civilians, including many children. His report contains video of the aftermath never before seen. http://youtu.be/WgQjUNvrsTA
  • Dirty Brigades: No Clean Hands in Iraq’s ISIS Fight

    Torture, beheadings, the cold blooded shooting of unarmed civilians, and all of it caught on camera in war-ravaged Iraq by the perpetrators acting with impunity. But the horror show was not by ISIS this time. An ABC News investigation, "Dirty Brigades: No Clean Hands in Iraq's ISIS Fight," found ample evidence of terrorist-like atrocities routinely committed over the past year by U.S.-trained Iraqi Security Forces, who Washington has been arming as the key to defeating ISIS. Incredibly, elite Iraqi Special Forces, special police and counterterrorism units were documenting their own horrific acts, filling the dark underbelly of Iraqi social media with gruesome snapshots and videos of their own war crimes in an apparent effort to stir up sectarian bloodlust. In the first in-depth exposé and analysis of these atrocities, the ABC News Brian Ross Investigative Unit, led by Producer James Gordon Meek, spent six months collecting and researching a photo and video gallery of horrors, interviewing human rights investigators, U.S. Special Forces veterans and diplomats who served in Iraq, as well as confronting both the American and Iraqi governments with their findings. The team presented the investigation to millions over three consecutive nights on ABC World News Tonight With David Muir, accompanied by in-depth digital reports, both print and broadcast, on ABCNews.com and ABC/Apple TV.
  • Journey to Jihad

    This is a nine-thousand-word investigation into the European jihadi pipeline. Using thousands of pages of leaked Belgian Federal Police records, which included wiretaps, electronic surveillance, seized radicalization pamphlets, and interrogation transcripts, it traces the web of connections between jihadi recruiters in Europe, and follows a reluctant ISIS member to Syria and back. It also reveals previously-unknown details on Amr al-Absi, the Syrian emir identified by the U.S. State Department as having been "in charge of kidnappings" for ISIS, as well war crimes committed against local civilians by his European recruits. I also took a portrait of the main subject, and a separate portrait of his father. Both pictures were published in the magazine. The article was my M.A. thesis project at Columbia Journalism School.
  • Under The Radar

    In an exhaustive, unprecedented review of more than 1,300 military court martial cases the Scripps Washington Bureau discovered at least 242 convicted military rapists, child molesters, and other sex offenders have fallen under the radar and slipped through what a member of the House Armed Services Committee calls a “gaping loophole” in the system. Scripps discovered some military sex offenders go on to re-offend in heinous ways on unsuspecting victims in the civilian world.
  • Good Cop, Bad Cop

    Who sues police departments the most? Police officers. In New Jersey, millions of dollars are spent each year on legal fees and settlements for lawsuits involving police. And, while you might imagine that a small handful of bad-apple cops are behind the cases, when you start digging through the legal paperwork a strange pattern begins to emerge. While there are lots of cases where civilians sue the police, there are more lawsuits where police are the plaintiffs. Police officers are suing each other, police departments and the towns and cities they work in -- cops accusing cops of harassment, retaliation and discrimination. Between 2009 and 2012, taxpayers in New Jersey footed the bill for over $49 million in legal fees, settlements and other costs relating to lawsuits involving the police. About $19.5 million went to cases where civilians sued — and $29 million on lawsuits brought by police. But ask government officials at any level throughout the state, and you’ll find no oversight of these cases or even awareness that there’s a problem. The costs don’t come out of police budgets so departments have little incentive to intervene and because the bills are often paid directly by insurance carriers, even the municipalities that pay the premiums aren’t paying attention. No one in the government is tracking the costs and in the meantime the bills continue to add up. And it’s not just the costs, experts says the cases should be tracked so that the data could be used as an early warning system to identify problem officers, but instead the data is being systematically ignored.
  • Cop Cams

    This piece gave our audience a first-hand look at some of the challenges a police officer may encounter while on patrol. Using miniature cameras worn by officers, we explored what happens when interactions between law enforcement and civilians escalate. When complaints arise about the conduct of officers involved in these situations, it is often hard to determine who did what to whom. To avoid relying on ‘he said/she said’ information, some police departments are now requiring their employees wear cameras on patrol.
  • Civilian Casualties in Afghanistan

    This multi-part print and online investigation, including an extensive, interactive database of incidents involving the deaths of Afghan civilians at the hands of U.S and allied forces, provides the first comprehensive look into collateral damage in the war in Afghanistan over the years 2001 through 2013.* Approximately 30,000 words in all, the package of articles uncovers faulty and profoundly inadequate efforts to count the dead and to keep track of civilian casualties, the gaps and missteps involved in efforts by the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) and its office for protection of civilians to account for civilian casualties, serious flaws in the U.S. military’s (classified) database called the Civilian Casualty Tracking Cell (and parallel units), and the lack of any serious effort by the Pentagon to create an Office of Civilian Protection for “lessons learned.” The package examines the practice of lethal profiling of so-called “military age males” throughout the U.S. chain of command and exposes its pernicious effect on American rules of engagement in Afghanistan. It also reports on studies, including those performed by the U.S. military itself, on the measurable and quantifiable effect of civilian casualties in “creating insurgents.” In additional features published online, we report on the haphazard record-keeping and lack of a coherent policy when it comes to payment of reparations for civilians killed in Afghanistan. And we closely examine three mass-casualty incidents involving Afghan civilians, tracing how they resulted from changes in the Pentagon’s own commander directives and guidelines to the troops in the field. *The interactive database concludes at the end of 2012, the last year for which a full data set was available at the time of publication.