Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "clinics" ...

  • The Trans Train

    The number of teenage girls who are seeking transgender care, has increased with thousands of percentages over the last couple of years. Many of them suffer from other diagnoses, such as Asbergers, ADHD, and self harm behavior. We could reveal that despite this being a new group in the trans gender health care clinics, they get the same treatments as previous patients in the trans gender care sector. Their bodies are transformed with hormones and transgender corrective surgery; sometimes it’s only a matter of weeks from the first visit at the clinic until the treatment commences.
  • inewsource: Hustling Hope

    inewsource spent months investigating how a California lawyer built a national network of Trina Health clinics to perform what he calls a “miraculous” treatment for reversing the complications of diabetes, even though medical experts consider it a scam that harms patients. Senior healthcare reporter Cheryl Clark tells the story of a couple in rural Montana who invested their life savings into opening their own clinic, in part so the husband could get the treatments locally for his diabetes. Less than two years later, the clinic was shuttered as health insurers refused to pay for the treatment and its founder came under federal investigation. He pleaded guilty in January 2019 to public corruption charges related to his Trina Health operation in Alabama.
  • Sobriety for Sale

    As a heroin/opioid epidemic gripped Washington State, KING 5’s investigative team uncovered corruption at a series of state-licensed drug and alcohol treatment clinics. “Sobriety for Sale” revealed the secret payments that left addicts untreated, courts misled, and the public at risk. The series also exposed shoddy oversight by the little known state agency that is supposed to be the watchdog over Washington’s 570 licensed treatment clinics.
  • The War on Women Is Over—and Women Lost

    The aim of these stories was to take the effects of five years of severe new abortion restrictions out of the realm of abstraction and show readers how drastically these laws had made the experience of getting an abortion more difficult. This was done primarily through interviews with volunteers who help women secure funding for an abortion and arrange their onerous travel schedules; women who had crossed state lines for their abortion; abortion providers struggling to comply with new regulations; and by analyzing internal numbers from abortion clinics who treat large numbers of women from out of state.
  • Pain pill abuse in Alabama

    Our series explored the pills to heroin pipeline and heroin arrests; the Dr. Feelgoods that prescribe painkillers at alarming rates; the links between pain pills and fatal overdoses; and the inside operations at a national pill mill in Mobile, Alabama. The problem has gotten so bad that federal authorities cracked down on pain doctors in the state as the number of painkiller clinics grew to more than 400.
  • ED clinic

    Through a series of investigative stories, The Enquirer discovered that a nationwide chain of erectile dysfunction clinics is run by a man convicted of fraud who has a history of making questionable business claims and pocketing disgruntled customers' money.
  • Cleveland Clinic cases highlight flaws in safety oversight

    A three-month Modern Healthcare analysis of hundreds of pages of federal inspection reports reveals the 1,268-bed Cleveland Clinic Hospital spent 19 months on “termination track” with Medicare between 2010 and 2013 as a result of more than a dozen inspections and follow-up visits triggered by patient complaints. The Cleveland Clinic is far from alone in facing the only sanction the CMS can apply to hospitals when serious safety problems and violations of informed consent rules are brought to light by patient complaints. An analysis of Medicare inspection data found that between 2011 and 2014 there were at least 230 validated serious incidents— dubbed “immediate jeopardy” complaints—that led the agency to threaten hospitals with losing their ability to serve Medicare patients unless they immediately fixed the problems. Overall, there were at least 9,505 CMS complaints lodged in that time against 1,638 hospitals, which included low-severity “standard level” violations; midlevel “condition level” violations; and the less common but most serious “immediate jeopardy” complaints. Only the most serious and condition-level complaints can lead to threats of being cut off from government funding. Only in very rarest of circumstances has the CMS followed through on the threat. The CMS’ ultimate goal with hospital inspections “is to ensure compliance with Medicare rules, not close down hospitals that are essential to local communities,” a CMS spokeswoman said.
  • Rehab Racket

    Taxpayers spend tens of millions of dollars each year in California on drug rehab centers designed to help low-income addicts. The clinics make their money billing for every client counseled. But CNN and The Center for Investigative Reporting exposed glaring and systemic failures in the program, including pervasive fraud – reporting that led to scores of clinics getting shut down. In coverage rolled out over several months, the team showed that taxpayers had spent at least $94 million over two years on Los Angeles-area clinics with clear signs of fraud or questionable billing. Regulators who could have stopped the abuses instead let misdeeds multiply. As a result of "Rehab Racket," the official overseeing the program apologized for the poor oversight and the state shut down a total of 177 clinic locations. Officials referred 69 clinics to the state Department of Justice, which opened criminal investigations.
  • Rehab Racket

    Taxpayers spend tens of millions of dollars each year in California on private drug rehab centers designed to help low-income addicts. The clinics make their money billing for every client counseled. But reporters from The Center for Investigative Reporting and CNN exposed glaring and systemic failures in the program, including pervasive fraud – reporting that led to scores of clinics getting shut down. In coverage rolled out over several months, the team showed that taxpayers had spent at least $94 million over two years on Los Angeles-area clinics with clear signs of fraud or questionable billing. Clinic directors pressured counselors to pad bills with “ghost clients” they never saw. Clinic staff bribed some of the region’s poorest residents to show up for counseling they didn’t need. In an ultimate irony, addicts were enticed to attend rehab sessions with gifts of booze and cigarettes. Regulators who could have stopped the abuses instead let misdeeds multiply. CIR reporters Christina Jewett and Will Evans teamed with CNN senior investigative producer Scott Zamost and investigative correspondent Drew Griffin to produce our series, “Rehab Racket,” on multiple platforms. Jewett and Evans wrote the stories for CIR and CNN. The cable network produced video that aired on “Anderson Cooper 360” and both of our websites.
  • Incredible Claims

    Mammograms are painful procedures that have been criticized for false positives and exposing patients to radiation, naturally some women were intrigued by the promise of digital breast thermography. Thermography is non-invasive scan that, according to the manufacturers and practitioners, can detect breast cancer up to 10 years before a mammogram. There’s just one problem: doctors say it doesn’t work. CBC identified over 50 thermography clinics in Canada, many of which claimed their equipment was able to detect breast cancer and save women from having to undergo mammograms. The American FDA had recently ordered Meditherm, a major manufacturers of thermography equipment, to stop making “false and misleading” claims about their products ability to diagnose illness. When we checked with Canadian regulators, both federally and provincially, each said another level of government was responsible for regulating thermography devices. CBC worked for weeks gathering interviews, information and documents related to thermography, all the while Canadian lawmakers stood by their original statements, saying thermography was not their problem. Across the country CBC started airing radio stories on the morning of November 27. By the evening news two provinces (Manitoba and Newfoundland) said they would take action against local clinics, and Health Canada said they were blocking the import of thermography devices into the country.