Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "communication" ...

  • Bribery Division

    The Bribery Division, an international investigation into Latin America’s largest construction company, reveals fresh evidence of hundreds of millions of dollars in suspicious payments linked to major infrastructure projects. Brazilian multinational Odebrecht has been implicated in a cash-for-contracts scandal that the U.S. Department of Justice has described as “the largest foreign bribery case in history.” The Bribery Division investigation unveils dramatic new information in taking readers inside the belly of the beast: Odebrecht’s Division of Structured Operations, a specialized unit created for the primary purpose of managing the company’s graft. A team of more than 50 journalists across the Americas, led by ICIJ, examined more than 13,000 Odebrecht documents from a secret communication platform used by the Structured Operations unit. The team’s sprawling expose revealed Odebrecht’s cash-for-contracts operation was even bigger than the company had acknowledged to prosecutors and had involved prominent figures and massive public works projects not mentioned in the criminal cases or other official inquiries to date.
  • The Hacker Who Took Down a Country

    The story chronicled how one hacker took nearly a whole country offline and revealed, for the first time, how and why he did it. Our reporting showed that Daniel Kaye was a mercenary, that he’d been paid to carry out the attack by the CEO of a large African telecommunications company, who had since gone into hiding. The story gave an unprecedented insight into the world of darkweb hackers and the unscrupulous figures who hire them.
  • The Center for Public Integrity: Wireless Wars: The Fight Over 5G

    One of the largest deployments of wireless technology in decades is occurring as telecommunications companies erect a new network of small cells to support the next generation of wireless communications called 5G. The problem, however, brings these small cells into neighborhoods and business districts, unlike the larger towers seen along highways and in fields far from centers of population. And with it, resistance from citizens. The clash pits telecoms, which want to ease regulations to reduce costs, against local governments and their residents, who want to control the look and placement of the cells and defend revenue and public property rights. The Center reports on how the telecoms are relying on money and tried-and-true relationships with politicians and regulators to get their way. And they are winning.
  • Not So Securus: Massive Hack of 70 Million Prisoner Phone Calls Indicates Violations of Attorney-Client Privilege

    The Intercept obtained a massive database of leaked phone records belonging to prison telecom giant Securus Technologies — accessed by an anonymous hacker and submitted to The Intercept via SecureDrop. By analyzing its contents, “Not So Securus” provided an unprecedented illustration of the sheer scale of phone surveillance of detainees within the criminal justice system, revealing how such monitoring has gone far beyond the stated goal of ensuring the security of prison facilities to compromise the privacy of inmates and their loved ones — and potentially violate the confidential communications guaranteed to prisoners and their lawyers.
  • Historic Flood: Houston’s Emergency Response

    Within days of historic flooding that left 8 people dead and parts of Houston devastated, the KPRC investigative team began digging for answers on the city’s emergency response to the hardest hit areas. Our primary focus started with the deaths of 3 citizens who were thrown into raging flood waters when a fire department rescue boat capsized. Our Open Records Request for the boat’s maintenance logs and emergency communications during that rescue yielded a shocking discovery about how unprepared firefighters were for this severe weather event. https://youtu.be/nDKfvSiujpI
  • Speaking up for Special Needs

    Investigation found an alarming number of children with disabilities in Wisconsin are dying from abuse or neglect, despite repeated calls to child protective service agencies. Our reporting found cases would be closed or not fully investigated when victims, who had disabilities, had a hard time communicating or couldn’t speak clearly. https://youtu.be/TOivj3kuc7c
  • The Politics of Big Telecom

    The largest U.S. telecommunications companies have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on lobbying, political contributions and influence campaigns that shape laws and regulations that will have long-lasting effects on how American businesses and citizens will pay for and get the online information they need to manage their everyday lives. For "The Politics of Big Telecom," the Center for Public Integrity combed through large databases of campaign finances, tax filings and regulatory reports, and interviewed dozens of people from top government officials to average people on the street to show how large telecommunications companies shape public policy to defend profits, hold on to market power and reduce choices for the public.
  • Human Trafficking in Virginia

    We found a case of human trafficking that led to charges and changes after we exposed communication issues across local and national agencies and a lack of training and resources. In the first story, we talked to Roanoke County Police Officers who stopped a man driving a mini-van of 16 people, stacked on top of each other. Once stopped, police identified it as a human trafficking case but had to let them all get back in the van and drive away because U.S. Customs and Immigration Enforcement (ICE) wasn’t available to assist them and they say since the words “human trafficking” are not in Virginia law there were not any laws to arrest the man driving and help the victims. We continued to follow this story for the next six months talking to lawmakers, state and federal agencies who told us our story revealed breakdowns and weaknesses that have since been fixed.
  • Human Trafficking in Virginia

    We found a case of human trafficking that led to charges and changes after we exposed communication issues across local and national agencies and a lack of training and resources. In the first story, we talked to Roanoke County Police Officers who stopped a man driving a mini-van of 16 people, stacked on top of each other.
  • Sex offenses on campus

    This story uncovered the causes for an incredibly low rate of reporting and prosecution for sex offenses at the University of Missouri. As many people know, universities have especially high rates of sexual victimization, such as rape, and especially low rates of prosecution for those crimes. My investigation, which took more than a year because of resistance from campus officials, revealed that only two sex offenses were ever reported to the student disciplinary office in 2012. Sexual violence survey data suggests the actual number of violations was more likely in the thousands, and nearly 100 violations were reported to campus police or the Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center. Throughout my reporting I discovered legal barriers, indifference among law enforcement, lack of communication and social phenomena that all contribute to this incredibly low rate. The article showed that prosecution for sex offenses at the University of Missouri is extremely rare, perhaps even more rare than prosecution in the state court system.