Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "compensation" ...

  • NationSwell: Forgotten Victims

    An investigation by NationSwell looked at county data in six states — Arizona, New Jersey, Louisiana, New York, Pennsylvania and Texas — which showed that thousands of families are denied compensation each year because of the contributory conduct clause. Regulators involved in processing claims say they are just following federal law and that there needs to be top-down change in order for there to be significant progress on the best way to assist financially strapped families. But one victim services group, Every Murder Is Real, based in Philadelphia — i.e. the city with the highest number of compensation claims filed each year in Pennsylvania — is helping families navigate the system and fight for their right to fair treatment.
  • The Marshall Project and Reveal: The Victims Who Don't Count

    In "The Victims Who Don't Count," The Marshall Project and Reveal investigate how every state sets aside money to help crime victims, but seven ban people with criminal records, a policy that mostly impacts black victims and their families.
  • The Daily News: The 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund

    During the course of reporting on the anniversary of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center, Daily News reporter Thomas Tracy spoke with an official on the record who said that the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund was running out of money. Tracy broke the news exclusively that the fund would not have enough money to help all survivors sickened at Ground Zero.
  • Politico: Wage Theft

    Raising hourly pay is a rallying cry for politicians and activists, but they’ve put little attention on a key problem for low-wage workers: states often fail to get workers the money they’re owed. Combining data analysis and interviews, a nine-month Politico investigation found workers are so lightly protected that six states have no investigators to handle minimum-wage violations, while 26 additional states have fewer than 10 investigators. Given the widespread nature of wage theft and the dearth of resources to combat it, an estimated $15 billion in desperately needed income for workers with the lowest wages goes instead into the pockets of shady bosses.
  • News4 I-Team: Injection Injuries

    This series examined the devastating effects of shoulder injuries from shots given incorrectly. We found those injuries now account for half of all the new cases in the federal Vaccine Injury Compensation Program- which was initially created to help victims injured by what's inside the syringe, not mistakes made by the shot-giver. We calculated that the federal agency which administers the program has quietly paid out $76 million for those injuries, without ever telling the shot-givers they did it incorrectly.
  • In Donors We Trust

    Everyone knows that college is more and more expensive to attend. So why are college and university endowments skyrocketing and now worth more than $567 billion? We started with the University of Michigan, lauded as one of the world’s best public universities which had stockpiled an endowment worth more than $11 billion. We found that university officials invested a good chunk of that endowment – one of the country’s largest among public institutions - in hundreds of private funds across the world. More importantly, our months-long investigation identified a select group who had secretly benefited: top university donors and alumni investment advisers who run private equity, hedge and venture capital funds and real estate investment firms. After our stories published throughout 2018, the university changed its investment policies; rerouted nearly $2 million into more student aid; made new investments based in the state; publicly released university executive compensation information after losing a FOIA lawsuit brought by the Free Press; and saw two university regents (i.e., trustees) lose their elections in November to those who promised more financial transparency and accountability based on our reporting.
  • Give and Take

    The Give and Take series is an exhaustive investigation into Vermont's nonprofit organizations. They employ nearly one in five of the state's workers, but get little scrutiny. We combined shoe-leather reporting and data journalism to uncover a series of surprising stories that looked at compensation, fundraising, gaming, lobbying and more.
  • Smart Consumer Reports

    "Smart Consumer Reports" is a weekly show that provides consumers with credible information for them to make rational choices through comparative experiments and analysis of consumer goods and services as consumers are the weak compared to producers and distributors. This episode covers the worst case of manufactured product in Korea, the humidifier sterilizer incident. The official recorded deaths are 146 from this incident and it's already been 5 years since the incident occurred. However, the government has been neglecting this incident and there has been no punishment for the manufacturer and compensation for the victims. This program reports such results and seeks for an institutional solution that can save the victims.
  • Compensating for Mass Murder

    This business feature examines how U.S. communities distribute the private donations given to help mass shooting survivors and victims’ families and how the lack of a national protocol affects locally-based victim compensation decisions.
  • Perils of Pantex

    An in-depth look at the federal program to compensate nuclear assembly plant workers in Amarillo was sparked after a controversial strike by workers -- the first in decades. Reporter Yamil Berard was sent to the scene as the strike was unfolding, only to bring back real stories about how the nation's program to compensate irradiated workers has failed to reach them before many die or become gravely ill. Berard also snapped the front page photo that ran with the package of stories and video.