Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "condo" ...

  • Toronto Star - Secrets of the Four Seasons

    In the middle of one of the hottest real estate markets in the world, a surprising number of residents in Toronto's most luxurious condo development are selling at a loss. The Toronto Star dug deep to figure out why and discovered that the Ontario property market is open to abuse because people can buy and sell anonymously. While other hot markets like New York, London and Vancouver have made moves to increase transparency, Toronto remains vulnerable to money laundering and tax evasion.
  • Free Water

    It seems like a simple process: you use a service, you pay for the service. But not when you are dealing with the city of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management. Most of this entry focuses on a single fancy condominium's startling water and sewer non-payment history and Atlanta's reaction. But the floodgates opened as the reporters continued digging. After finally receiving records the city didn't want them to see, the reporters found even more shocking multi-million dollar billing mistakes on thousands of other properties.
  • Condo Takeover

    This “Condo Takeover” series looks at what happened to Florida condos after the real estate crash in 2008-9. [https://ajam.app.box.com/s/ndmvyhiqu6qzylupzhecfgp7vexuxr7o] [https://ajam.app.box.com/s/2m9j7cn06gh3fr18q2mjoqyqiraskhcx]
  • CA Investigation - Untested Rape Kits

    This entry tells the story of Terry Burks, a sexual assault survivor who was gang raped in 1988 in a still-unsolved case – then was victimized again by police so caught up in clearing a mountain of untested rape kits they didn’t take the time to examine her case. Police tested Terry’s kit as they rushed to clear a backlog of 12,000 rape kits they learned they’d been sitting on. Months later, she was told testing found no DNA in her kit. But if police had bothered to read Terry’s case file they would have found why there likely was no DNA there: Her attackers had worn condoms, The Commercial Appeal found. What’s more, her case file, obtained by the newspaper, contained records showing those condoms had been destroyed in 2002.
  • Firestone and the Warlord

    "Firestone and the Warlord" investigates the secret relationship between the American tire company Firestone and the infamous Liberian warlord Charles Taylor. The multiplatform investigation is a revelatory window into how Firestone conducted business during the brutal Liberian civil war, drawing on previously unreported diplomatic cables, court documents, and inside accounts from Americans who helped run the company's rubber plantation as Liberia descended into chaos. The Liberian civil war resulted in the deaths of more than 200,000 people. Half the country’s population was displaced. Taylor later became the first person convicted of crimes against humanity since the Nazi era. Through most of the conflict, Firestone continued to export rubber to the United States and elsewhere to produce tires, condoms and medical supplies.
  • FEMA's Fickle Flood Maps

    We've read for years now about anger at the high costs to property owners of changes to FEMA's flood maps, but we hadn't read this before: As homeowners around the nation protest skyrocketing premiums for federal flood insurance, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has quietly moved the lines on its flood maps to benefit hundreds of oceanfront condo buildings and million-dollar homes, according to an analysis of federal records by NBC News. Reporters Bill Dedman and Miranda Leitsinger produced a three-part series showing that FEMA had approved those revisions -- removing more than 500 waterfront properties from the highest-risk flood zone and saving the owners as much as 97 percent on the premiums they pay into the financially strained National Flood Insurance Program – even as owners of homes and businesses far from a water source were being added to the maps asked to pay far more for their coverage.
  • Corruption at Juvenile Prisons

    Chris Kirkham exposes the corruption at juvenile for-profit prisons, boot camps and detention centers. From condoning abuse of inmates to neglect to corruption we'll hear firsthand stories from those on the inside.
  • Prisoners of Profit

    HuffPost Business reporter Chris Kirkham exposes the corruption at juvenile for-profit prisons, boot camps and detention centers. From condoning abuse of inmates to neglect to corruption, Kirkham uncovers firsthand stories from those on the inside.
  • Flood Cars

    ABC's The Lookout and Nightline investigates vehicles were seriously damaged by Hurricane Sandy and the people and institutions responsible for them turning up for sale in used car lots across the country.
  • Al Qaeda in Kentucky

    This exclusive ABC News investigation found that American counterterrorism officials were investigating more than a dozen cases of possible terrorists who have slipped into the U.S. under the refugee program. With rare access inside current and ongoing major terrorism investigations, the in-depth investigative reports broadcast on "Nightline," "World News with Diane Sawyer" and "Good Morning America" told the story of how a little noticed arrest of two men in Kentucky led to a major national security investigation that commanded the attention of top officials, including President Obama. The Iraqis were not refugees fleeing persecution, as they had claimed to immigration authorities, but were al Qaeda-iraq terrorists who had targeted U.S. troops in northern Iraq with bombs and sniper attacks. A key piece of evidence was that the fingerprints of one defendant were located on an improvised explosive device stored in a box for six years in an FBI warehouse, which had been found buried in a Baiji, Iraq road by American soldiers in September 2005. Worse, the two Iraqi insurgents, who had lied their way into the U.S. as alleged refugees -- and escaped drawing scrutiny until they were serttled in Kentucky -- were plotting to ship- heavy arms back to Iraq in an FBI sting, and were also discussing U.S. Homeland revenge bombings, the FBI learned. ABC News was able not only to tell the story of this incredible counterterrorism investigation by the FBI with help from the U.S. military, but also connect a specific bombing in Baiji that killed four Pennsylvania National Guardsmen to the Iraqi defendants. The exclusive ABC News investigation, which was broadcast on the network's three major newscasts as well as online with stories and web extra videos, also broke the news of current FBI counterterrorism investigations of suspects inside the U.S. whose fingerprints are being checked with those lifted from devices in evidence at the FBI's secret "bomb library," where ABC News was shown 100,000 IEDs collected from warzones in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere.