Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "condom" ...

  • Free Water

    It seems like a simple process: you use a service, you pay for the service. But not when you are dealing with the city of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management. Most of this entry focuses on a single fancy condominium's startling water and sewer non-payment history and Atlanta's reaction. But the floodgates opened as the reporters continued digging. After finally receiving records the city didn't want them to see, the reporters found even more shocking multi-million dollar billing mistakes on thousands of other properties.
  • CA Investigation - Untested Rape Kits

    This entry tells the story of Terry Burks, a sexual assault survivor who was gang raped in 1988 in a still-unsolved case – then was victimized again by police so caught up in clearing a mountain of untested rape kits they didn’t take the time to examine her case. Police tested Terry’s kit as they rushed to clear a backlog of 12,000 rape kits they learned they’d been sitting on. Months later, she was told testing found no DNA in her kit. But if police had bothered to read Terry’s case file they would have found why there likely was no DNA there: Her attackers had worn condoms, The Commercial Appeal found. What’s more, her case file, obtained by the newspaper, contained records showing those condoms had been destroyed in 2002.
  • Firestone and the Warlord

    "Firestone and the Warlord" investigates the secret relationship between the American tire company Firestone and the infamous Liberian warlord Charles Taylor. The multiplatform investigation is a revelatory window into how Firestone conducted business during the brutal Liberian civil war, drawing on previously unreported diplomatic cables, court documents, and inside accounts from Americans who helped run the company's rubber plantation as Liberia descended into chaos. The Liberian civil war resulted in the deaths of more than 200,000 people. Half the country’s population was displaced. Taylor later became the first person convicted of crimes against humanity since the Nazi era. Through most of the conflict, Firestone continued to export rubber to the United States and elsewhere to produce tires, condoms and medical supplies.
  • Chicago Takes on Bad Developers, With Mixed Results

    Some Chicago neighborhoods face a troubling conundrum. Thousands of condominiums that were built during the "housing boom" are "proving to be poorly built." Leaks and electrical issues are only a couple of the problems homeowners are facing. In an effort to help the homeowners, the city of Chicago filed lawsuits against the condo developers. The effort has backfired. Many developers have fled the country, which leaves the homeowners with thousands of dollars in repairs that are needed to fix the code violations.
  • Moldy Metropolis: Homeowners Struggle with Leaky Concrete

    Poorly built condominiums and the homeowners are now seeing the consequences of the poor construction. The condominiums have severe mold problems, which is a result from using a material called split-free concrete block. The story reveals the lack of building inspection since the blocks should be built without leaks and inspected for leaks. Furthermore, if the homeowners complain to the city, they are held accountable for the code violation.
  • Forced Out

    This series from the Washington Post investigates the corrupt practices of landlords driving tenants from their homes under the guise of refusing repairs or forcing families to live without heat, hot water or electricity. This was in response to a law meant to give tenants a voice in the city's redevelopment. In recent years, tenants had fled more than 200 rent-controlled apartment complexes without the chance to vote on redevelopment. With empty buildings, landlords quickly reaped $328 million in condominium sales and avoided $16 million in conversion fees.
  • Ohio Attorney General: Price of Corruption

    WBNS-TV (Columbus, Ohio) revealed a pattern of corruption inside the state's highest law enforcement office including cronyism, misuse of state funds and property, improper use of campaign funds, ethics violations and cover-up. The reporters found that the Attorney General had used campaign funds to rent a condominium for two of his friends/employees that was later tied to sexual harassment,alleged crimes involving state vehicles and the hub for cronyism. Their reporting revealed that the Attorney General created a "transition fund" as an unregulated 501 c4 non-profit account. Through law enforcement, the station learned that this fund funneled at least $2,000 in inappropriate payments to the Attorney General's friend/employee/condo-mate.
  • Mississippi Developers' Pasat Includes Fraud

    After Hurricane Katrina hit Hancock County, Mississippi, a massive reconstruction project was planned to restore resorts, condominiums and a casino. The developers Paradise Properties of Florida vowed to spend $5 billion to help in the effort, an amount which is worth more than the real estate in Hancock County before the hurricane. But members of the firm have been accused of multi-million dollar internet scams.
  • Divine Intervention: U.S. AIDS Policy

    "The Center’s year-long investigation revealed how rigid rules and funding earmarks of President's Bush $15-billion initiative to fight HIV/AIDS abroad- the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief- hinder effective HIV programming and frustrate countries struggling with the pandemic."
  • One Small Lot, One Big Mess

    Long Island development group Utopia Studios, Ltd. "proposed a major development for the southeastern Connecticut region," with their takeover of "one of the most vital pieces of property in the region" approved by Preston, Connecticut voters. Utopia promised "a $1.6 billion project with theme parks and movie studios and 22,000 new jobs" and thus gained a lot of political support. But the Day "discovered that the principle Utopia developer, Joseph Gentile, had been sued in conjunction with a condominium project in New York City." Reporter Paul Choiniere investigated further, and found that Gentile's dealings on that property were questionable.