Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "conference" ...

  • Oregonian: Pac-12 Left Out

    A four-part series that provides an in-depth look at the many issues facing the Pac-12 Conference, including extraordinarily high operating costs, a struggling TV network and a commissioner who spends lavishly.
  • CBS Evening News, Eye On America: Investigating Their Own

    The CBS Evening News’ Eye on America series investigates how the head of the US Conference of Bishops kept two priests accused of abuse in active ministry. CBS News confronts Archbishop Daniel DiNardo, arguably the most powerful official in the US Catholic Church, about whether he turned a blind eye to abuse in his own archdiocese.
  • Taking out a Reverse Mortgage Ruined My Life

    Dozens of senior citizens in New York City are caught in a rising tide of reverse- mortgage foreclosures that threaten to put some of the city’s most vulnerable residents out on the street. Because reverse-mortgage borrowers in foreclosure lack the protections — including mandatory settlement conferences and a 90-day notice requirement — instituted for traditional borrowers after the 2010 robo-signing scandal, these seniors are at risk of losing their homes far more quickly than forward-mortgage borrowers, who get an opportunity for negotiations overseen by the court. The debts at issue are relatively small, averaging just $10,000, but can trigger the loss of a home worth thirty times that amount or more.
  • Dangerous Doses

    For one story, “The hunt for dangerous doses,” investigative reporter Sam Roe led a collaboration with data scientists, pharmacologists and cellular researchers at Columbia University Medical Center in an attempt to discover potentially deadly combinations of prescription drugs. Intrigued by the novel data mining algorithms developed by Columbia scientist Nicholas Tatonetti, Roe proposed that the two team up to search for drug combinations that might cause a potentially fatal heart condition. Roe also recruited Dr. Ray Woosley, the leading authority on that condition and a former dean of the University of Arizona medical school, to the team. Over two years, as he orchestrated the project, Roe traveled to New York 12 times to meet with Tatonetti. They brainstormed, analyzed data and talked with Woosley via conference calls. Several of Tatonetti’s graduate students joined the team, as did Columbia cellular researchers whose work provided a critical layer of validation of the results.
  • Investigating the Investigators

    WTSP's series investigating sex predator stings exposed how detectives were improperly entrapping men that posed little – or no – threat to society. They challenged authority, exposed wrongdoing, and prompted changes over the course of our two-year-long investigation. Even though NBC ended its run of “To Catch a Predator” stings years ago, similar operations continued in Florida well into 2014, thriving on federal grants and made-for-TV press conferences. Their nine stories showed how detectives had to start leaning on dishonest and unethical tactics to keep up their arrest totals.
  • "Under the Curse of Cartels"

    This project gave readers an unprecedented look at the highly-organized drug trafficking organizations that had taken control of Oregon's drug underworld. This was not just a report about drug dealing. This was about execution-style murders never before publicly linked to Mexican drug cartels. This was about tracing how a cartel-linked trafficker set up a national drug distribution network from rural towns in Oregon. This was about the price paid by end users, including a harrowing account of a young man's death from a heroin overdose. Drug arrests were not news in Oregon. Police agencies routinely issue press releases, prosecutors hold news conferences, and photos of seized drugs and money handed out. That's where the coverage often ends. "Under the Curse of Cartels" documented the true scale behind this drug trafficking -- the sophisticated organizations, their ruthless control, and their elaborate counter-surveillance efforts to detect police investigations. The project took reporting on drug trafficking to a new level with the intimate insider details from both sides of the law. The series was a shocking wake up for Oregon, including many in the law enforcement community who didn't have access to the kind of information collated by The Oregonian.
  • Cars for Congress

    At the height of the debt ceiling debate, the investigative team at WTTG pulled video from floor debates, news conferences and other sources to show how the very people demanding the nation make sacrifices by cutting the budget were the ones taking advantage of a Congressional loophole--allowing Congress to use government money to buy luxury cars.
  • Brian Ross Investigates: State House Scoundrels

    The story explores the unsettling problem of state house corruption and reveals what really happens at Kentucky's annual conference of state lawmakers.
  • "NCAA - College Athletic Fees"

    In this months-long report, USA Today analyzed hundreds of "financial reports" that college athletic programs are "required to release to the NCAA." They found that many schools are relying more on student fees to finance sports programs (without student's knowledge). The investigation also reveals a growing "unrest" at many universities in response to the financial "divide between sports and academics."
  • Grants, Graft and Greed at Workforce West Virginia

    Mary Jane Bowling, an employee at the Workforce West Virginia office, secretly distributed federal grant money to her son's company, Comar, Inc. Martin Bowling then used the money to pay for travels to conferences that ultimately helped expand his company. Reporter Eric Eyre later exposed an attempted cover-up of the mishandled money by Mary Jane Bowling and her housemate, Christine Gardner, who ran the West Virginia State University's Economic Development Center in Charleston.