Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

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  • Tailspin

    “Tailspin” uncovered the financial, legal and security problems inside a fast-growing private jet company named JetSmarter. The private jet world gets little scrutiny, protected by a tightknit group of companies and elite customers. JetSmarter became the darling of the media and industry, led by a charismatic CEO and hyped by celebrities on social media. But our investigation found that the company sold memberships that quickly proved to be worthless. Its CEO touted its success as the first “flying unicorn” worth $1.5 billion, but we found JetSmarter was losing millions of dollars a month.
  • 48 Hours: “Fatal Crossing”

    “Fatal Crossing” is a 48 Hours original investigation into the mysterious circumstances surrounding the deaths of Kadie Major, 26, and her 10-month-old daughter, River Lynn. In January 2008, their bodies were found along railroad tracks in Moncks Corner, SC. After a one-week investigation, the Berkeley County Sheriff’s Office determined that Kadie –five months pregnant— had murdered her daughter before killing herself by jumping in front of a moving train.
  • Democrat and Chronicle: Rochester food truck builder burns customers nationwide

    When reporters at the Democrat and Chronicle received a call from a distressed food truck owner who had been burned by a local food truck builder, a quick records check revealed a surprising tally of lawsuits and tax liens for what had been regarded as a prominent local business. That led to a six-month investigation that revealed a business in a downward spiral, bringing down customers across the country as they cut corners on workmanship and accepted deposits of $10,000 to $42,500 and strung customers along for months. The gripping narrative painted a sobering downside to the hot food truck industry.
  • CBS THIS MORNING: Cobalt Mining in the DRC

    Our CBS This Morning investigation into cobalt mining in the DRC and its subsequent impact was the kind of journalism we feel privileged to do. We saw an injustice being done in a corner of the world most Americans rarely get to see, and uniquely that injustice could be directly be tied to our everyday lives. The process of tracing our batteries to the small hands that help to make them was a 6-month marathon of searching for clues in what seemed like a black hole of information.
  • Boston Globe: Secret Courts

    "Secret Courts" exposed the darkest corner of the Massachusetts criminal justice system. Criminal cases, including felony charges of vehicle homicide and rape, are held in closed-door hearings -- often in private offices without public notice -- and the outcome is up to the discretion of a single court official who may not have a law degree. No other state has anything like it.
  • Inside the Secret Courts

    "Secret Courts" exposed the darkest corner of the Massachusetts criminal justice system. Criminal cases, including felony charges of vehicle homicide and rape, are held in closed-door hearings -- often in private offices without public notice -- and the outcome is up to the discretion of a single court official who may not have a law degree. No other state has anything like it.
  • Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup

    In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work. A riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley.
  • The Digilantes Try to Find Out Who Is Behind Mugshot.com

    The Digilantes uncovered a multi-million dollar extortion-based industry that’s wreaking havoc upon tens of millions of Americans’ lives, especially minorities. It’s the business of mugshot websites. Operators of these sites scrape public arrest records from online police databases, put them on their own websites, making them easily searchable on Google, and then charge hundreds of dollars to remove them, whether you are guilty or not. These mugshots, which can live forever online, are a form of digital scarlet letter ruining people's’ reputations, job and housing opportunities, even their dating lives. http://fusion.net/story/252451/digilantes-mugshots-dotcom-investigation/
  • Lead Poisoning in Erie County and Buffalo

    Buffalo’s lead poisoning problem due to old housing stock and water utilities is getting out of hand. Investigative Post found that both the Erie County Water Authority and the Buffalo Water Board cut corners in their lead sampling programs for drinking water.
  • Dirty Little Secrets: Inside the Panama Papers

    Under the mantle of its “Naked Truth” investigative documentary series, Fusion was chosen by the the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) as one of only two US English-language partners -- and the only one to produce a full-length video documentary -- for its investigation into the Panama Papers, a leak of more than 11.5 million documents from Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca.