Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "coroners" ...

  • Left for Dead and the interactive database, The Lost & The Found

    Left for Dead is the first national examination of Jane and John Does and the failures of sheriffs and coroners to identify unclaimed and unnamed bodies – a problem the Department of Justice has called “the nation’s silent mass disaster.” G.W. Schulz’s exhaustive reporting exposed the challenges of identifying them. Those challenges, he found, range from neglect, indifference and a lack of will by local authorities, to three unsuccessful attempts in the U.S. Congress to require police and death investigators to use an existing national registry of missing people. Following his reporting, the bill was reintroduced this year. Reveal obtained federal data that tracks unidentified bodies, which informed our reporting. We also built an online tool for matching missing people with unidentified bodies.
  • Post Mortem: Death Investigation in America

    "This series focused on the nation's death investigation system, the more than 2,300 coroner and medical examiner offices responsible for probing sudden and suspicious fatalities. They found a profession plagued by a widespread lack of resources, a lack of national standards or regulation, and a drastic shortage of qualified doctors."
  • Fatal Flaws

    "Nebraska has no state oversight and few standards to ensure quality death investigations by coroners or law enforcement. As part of two-week series, The World-Hearld detailed 15 botched cases that illustrate weaknesses in the system."
  • Dying For a Job

    While workplace insurance boards across Canada claimed workplaces are safer, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation investigated workplace safety. They found that "the number of workplace deaths had increased by about 7 percent from 1993 to 2004." In addition, coroners' suggestions on making workplaces safer for workers have largely been ignored, and are "not shared from jurisdiction to jurisdiction in a manner that would help make their workplaces safer." The investigation also found that health care and social services workers were in more danger than others, "anywhere from six to 12 times more likely to file claims related to violence on the job, mainly from patients." This is higher than even the rate for police and security.
  • Death and Destruction

    A collection of statistics-based stories including: state and local coroners offices that disposed of unidentified cadavers without informing authorities, the early death of professional athletes due to dramatically increased weight, the natural disaster declarations by presidents seeking re-election, and the elimination of helmet-use among motorcyclists.
  • Evidence of Injustice

    An exclusive i-team investigation shows how inconsistencies, mistakes and staffing problems are raising serious questions at the Maricopa County Medical Examiners Offices. This is a new forensic science center where coroners perform autopsies on people who have died on unnatural causes in this county. Investigators and legal experts rely on the information provided by this office, but the information is not always correct. Interviewees on this tape say that leads to having innocent people on trial for crimes that do not exist. In one case, the Sheriff's office began using an amended autopsy to defend a mysterious jail death. The Chief Medical Examiner changed his opinion about the jail death two years after the original autopsy, without any new information. Some Medical Examiners are doing many more autopsies per year than what is recommended.
  • Death of Innocents

    The Post Register investigated child abuse deaths in Idaho, including prevention efforts, death investigations and prosecutions. They found that Idaho children killed in the last four years often showed signs of abuse or neglect before their deaths.
  • Last Rights

    WSMV-TV found that "for more than two decades, the University of Tennessee has conducted death research, using real bodies. Research unlike any other in the world. The studies are publicly-funded, though no one has ever questioned the methods and ethics behind them." The investigation "uncovered shocking violations of state law, disregard for veterans rights and the deception of grieving families."
  • Dying in Custody

    The Asbury Park Press reports that "Hundreds of people, some charged with only minor offenses, wind up dead in jail cells and lockups across the country each year. The actual toll is unknown because no one, including the federal government, bothers keeping track.... What authorities do know is that the majority of these cell deaths outside the formal prison systems are reported as suicides..."
  • Cause of Death: Unknown

    The St. Louis Post Dispatch asks "Is it possible to get away with murder in Missouri?...(Reporters) spent three months combing death certificates and interviewing county coroners, grieving family members, and professional death experts to find out how well Missouri's death-investigation system works. They found a shockingly haphazard system for determining how someone dies, with death investigations varying widely from county to county and from case to case."