Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "corrections" ...

  • Ohio Parole System Problems

    Over the course of 18 months, three young women were killed in separate murders by violent ex-felons who were supposed to be closely monitored by Ohio’s Adult Parole Authority. They weren’t. Time and time again, WBNS-TV’s investigative unit, 10 Investigates, found lapses in judgment and failures by the state’s parole system to closely monitor these ex-felons. In one case, a Georgia judge’s order to place a GPS ankle monitor on a twice convicted rapist was ignored. The reason: Ohio’s Adult Parole Authority believed it would be too expensive. Six months later, the man was arrested for the rape and murder of a young woman. We also uncovered data showing part of the problem might be many of these parole officers are overwhelmed. State corrections records show there are 450 parole officers in Ohio tasked with monitoring 37,000 ex-prisoners who are under some type of post-release supervision. Given that workload, it’s hard for anyone to understand why these parole officers would be assigned to watch an empty parking lot. But that’s where we found some of them sitting every day, for nearly a month. Our reporting on this issue has already changed state law and led to the ire of some state lawmakers who are calling for additional changes.
  • The Man Inside: Four months as a prison guard

    Prisons are almost impossible for reporters to get inside, and few people know what life inside is like for inmates and guards. But one journalist cracked the shell of secrecy by getting a job as a prison guard. He witnessed cost-cutting measures and reported safety concerns affecting prisoners and staff. On this episode of Reveal, they take an unprecedented look inside the multibillion-dollar private prison industry. https://www.revealnews.org/episodes/the-man-inside-four-months-as-a-prison-guard/ http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2016/06/cca-private-prisons-corrections-corporation-inmates-investigation-bauer
  • Wrongful State Firings

    Arizona Republic senior reporter Craig Harris spent much of 2016 investigating wrongful firings of state employees, including a juvenile corrections teacher who was fighting breast cancer. His dogged reporting resulted in 47 public employees wrongly fired getting their jobs back and new job protections for state workers.
  • My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard

    In December 2014, senior reporter Shane Bauer—using his own name and employment history—applied for a job as a prison guard for the Corrections Corporation of America (now known as CoreCivic), the country's second-largest private prison company. He was quickly hired for a $9-an-hour job at a medium-security prison in Louisiana. That began a four-month odyssey during which Bauer witnessed stabbings, an escape, lockdowns—and his own transformation into a corrections officer, with reactions and feelings he barely recognized as his own. "My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard" is a raw, gripping chronicle of a company's struggle to maintain control of a facility stretched to the limit by cost-cutting and mismanagement, and Bauer's own fight to maintain his humanity in a system that is equally destructive of both inmates and guards. https://youtu.be/cBiqRGXog4w?list=PL7FWr6whNWmhueSwdXFBsNJkZXkMIQ9lf http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2016/06/reveal-episode-shane-bauer-man-inside
  • Wrongful State Firings

    Arizona Republic senior reporter Craig Harris spent much of 2016 investigating wrongful firings of state employees, including a juvenile corrections teacher who was fighting breast cancer. His dogged reporting resulted in 47 public employees wrongly fired getting their jobs back and new job protections for state workers. http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/09/08/gov-doug-ducey-forces-out-juvenile-corrections-chief-dona-markley-after-questionable-firings/90094760/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/10/31/fired-arizona-workers-inundate-call-center-appealing-get-jobs-back/93083666/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/11/23/gov-doug-ducey-fires-arizona-des-chief-tim-jeffries/94350606/ http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-investigations/2016/12/23/arizona-rehire-40-des-workers-227-remain-fired/95795356/
  • How the Government Put Tens of Thousands of People at Risk of a Deadly Disease

    An in-depth investigation into valley fever in California prisons and how the state put tens of thousands of people at risk of a deadly disease. Major findings include evidence that the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation did little to mitigate the problem, ignored data and internal reports suggesting the disease affected people of color more seriously and quashed a federal study of the epidemic within state prisons.
  • The Final Days of Michael Kerr

    The death of inmate Michael Kerr by dehydration in 2014 ignited a barrage of activity in the state's corrections system and raised questions about prisoner treatment that reached the chambers of the North Carolina General Assembly more than a year later. Hundreds of pages of court documents pieced together the mentally ill veteran’s last hours in solitary confinement at a remote state prison, ignored and dismissed by an overworked corrections staff. http://www.wral.com/one-year-later-inmate-s-death-looms-over-prison-mental-health-debate/14506834/ http://www.wral.com/news/state/asset_gallery/14731191/
  • Trouble Behind Bars

    A KyCIR investigation found preventable county jail deaths that provoked little to no follow-up, as well as failures at all levels of government. Not even the state Department of Corrections knows who is dying in county jails, and why. https://soundcloud.com/wfplnews/rg-dunlop-on-the-cost-of-jail-abuse-and-misconduct https://soundcloud.com/wfplnews/rg-dunlop-on-former-grant-co-jailer-terry-peeples/s-i3QFO https://soundcloud.com/wfplnews/trouble-behind-bars-when-jail-deaths-go-unnoticed https://soundcloud.com/wfplnews/remedies-rare-for-grant-countys-dangerous-jail https://soundcloud.com/wfplnews/cascade-of-failures-lead-to-25-year-olds-death-in-grant-county-jail
  • Tech Behind Bars

    "Tech Behind Bars" is a deeply reported, multi-media three-part examination of the growing intersection of the corrections system and the technology industry. Part 1, "Inside the prison system’s illicit digital world," explores the growing problem of smartphone smuggling inside federal and state prisons, and reveals dozens of social media profiles of inmates currently serving time in several states, many of whom were using the internet illicitly from their cells. Part 2, "After years behind bars, can prisoners re-enter a digital society?", explores what happens to inmates after they're released from length prison stays, and are forced into a world and a job market that expects them to have familiarity with the tools of the digital age, and profiles Code 7370, a program at San Quentin State Prison that is equipping inmates with computer skills in preparation for their re-entry. Part 3, "Can technology and prisons get along?", is an examination of the growing number of attempts to integrate modern technology into correctional facilities, through the lens of the Napa County Jail, which is giving tablets to its inmates in attempt to keep them up to speed with the digital revolution.
  • Code of Silence

    "Code of Silence" is an investigative documentary about the sexual harassment of female corrections officers at the hands of their co-workers. The half-hour film was our master's project for Columbia Journalism School. https://vimeo.com/147951744