Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "coverage" ...

  • Families complain of mold, lead paint, rats in military housing ahead of hearing

    In February, CBS News gained access to privatized housing at Ft. Meade, becoming the first national television network to go on to a military base to investigate issues within the U.S. military’s privatized housing program. Through our coverage, CBS News exposed problems with mold, insects and structural integrity covered up or ignored by private housing companies. This story led to a swift response from then-Secretary of the Army Mark Esper, who granted an exclusive on-camera interview with CBS News to outline how his department planned to respond.
  • Special pardon and PyeongChang...Samsung's Secret Deal

    139 emails shared between Samsung chief executives are exclusively collected, and the first coverage of the fact of Samsung's illegal lobbying in order to host the PyeongChang Olympics was made for the first time both nationally and internationally. The detailed basis of the special pardoning of Chairman Lee Kun-hee was also revealed, exposing the alliance of the government and businesses. The corruption cases of the IOC members that had wielded immense power were also released. Coverage was made on site in Europe and Africa for higher quality.
  • North Bay Bohemian: Sonoma Trifecta

    The three interlocking stories uncovered a real estate investor-banking-media network that illuminates the shape of Sonoma County’s “shadow” government. A development partnership angling for a county contract includes a county official who partners with a banker who flaunts ethics regulations in a fire disaster rebuild area. An owner of a major local newspaper is a board member of the bank which receives favorable press coverage in the newspaper for its fire deals that do not disclose the ownership connection. Another owner of the newspaper, a real estate investor and political consultant, is found to have defrauded a local Indian tribe in a real estate deal and in cahoots with the son of a U.S. Senator. As we go to press, the newspaper fails to report on the fraud when confronted with the relevant court documents, publishing only a 900 word story on a “dispute” that our 3,500 story unveils as fraud and breach of contract. The need for surviving alt-weeklies to keep publishing hard-hitting LOCAL investigative journalism is reaffirmed.
  • Miami Herald: FIU Bridge

    On March 15, an under-construction, 174-foot-long concrete pedestrian bridge collapsed on a busy road next to Florida International University's campus. Five people who by a cruel twist of fate happened to be driving under the bridge were instantly crushed to death. In addition, a worker standing on top of the structure, a joint project managed by both FIU and the state of Florida, was killed in the collapse. Several more people were injured. Herald reporters immediately rushed to the scene to report on the stunning accident. Following the initial coverage, a team of reporters worked for the rest of the year -- fighting for public records all the way -- to uncover why the bridge had fallen, who had oversight of the taxpayer-funded project, why the road below it remained open during crucial structural work and the impact on the families of the dead.
  • CBS THIS MORNING: The Prison Release of David Robinson

    DAVID ROBINSON WALKED OUT OF A MISSOURI PRISON IN MAY, 2018 INTO THE WAITING ARMS OF HIS MOTHER AFTER SPENDING NEARLY TWO DECADES BEHIND BARS FOR A CRIME HE DID NOT COMMIT. WHILE THE OCCASION WAS CAUSE FOR CELEBRATION, OUR COVERAGE WAS DESIGNED TO INFORM AUDIENCES OF THE HIGHLY UNUSUAL PATH ROBINSON’S LAWYERS TOOK TO PROVE HIS INNOCENCE. OUR COVERAGE WAS ALSO CREDITED WITH THE NEEDED ADDED IMPETUS TO LEAD TO A TIMELY RELEASE.
  • CBC Marketplace - Crying Out for Care

    Crying Out for Care was a 22-minute episode of Marketplace and digital, social, television and radio stories to reach a broad audience. Marketplace is a long-running Canadian Broadcasting Corporation investigative consumer affairs television program. its stories are presented in documentary form on the show and other versions, angles and follow-ups appear in the newscasts,news programs, website and social media of CBC. This submission includes the Marketplace episode and includes some of that other coverage. Topic: Marketplace applied data journalism techniques as well as it usual research to dig into the quality of care residents in nursing and long term care homes are receiving.
  • Baltimore Sun: The Baltimore Police Gun Trace Task Force Scandal

    The Baltimore Sun’s coverage of arguably the biggest corruption scandal in the history of the Baltimore Police Department continued into 2018, with the trials of the remaining officers charged in the federal case and the fallout from the case. The Sun produced work that revealed the suburban drug case that led authorities to the rogue squad, how the convictions thrust into question thousands of open and adjudicated cases involving the officers and what the trials revealed about the deep reach of the city’s drug economy.
  • Asylum Crackdown

    In her investigation “Chinatown Asylum Crackdown,” NPR’s Ailsa Chang shines a light on a never-before reported aspect of the Trump administration’s clampdown on the asylum system. Much of the news coverage on President Trump’s immigration policies has been focused on the White House’s efforts to turn away asylum-seekers at the border. What Chang reveals in her investigation for NPR’s Planet Money podcast is the Trump administration’s quiet operation to strip asylum status from immigrants who won it years ago. The people targeted in this sweeping review are Chinese immigrants – more than 13,000 of them. Many of them have been living in the U.S. for years with green cards and are now spending thousands of dollars defending their asylum cases in immigration court – years after winning asylum.
  • Election Integrity: The Southern Vote Project

    In our groundbreaking, exclusive, “flood-the-zone” Southern Vote Project, WhoWhatWhy probed the state of election integrity and revealed deep problems, including widespread disenfranchisement of large segments of the voting public. Sending a full-time team to several southern states, we documented a broad range of factors, some seemingly intentional, that resulted in voter suppression or created cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Because we were uniquely focused on this topic, we started breaking stories that other outlets were unwilling or unable to pursue. Our work played an important role in compelling legacy news outlets to begin covering this issue. Our hard-hitting coverage also resulted in several lawsuits, which in turn brought about changes in how votes were counted through court decisions made in the heat of the elections.
  • Gone Too Soon: Revisiting the 1983 Murder of Joan Ann Charlton – A Comprehensive Collection of Information, 33 Years Later

    In September 1983, a 19-year-old Jamaican-American freshman from Baltimore, Joan Ann Charlton – who would have been the first member of her family to graduate from college – was found dead of multiple stab wounds on Frostburg State’s campus, a crime that was never solved. This student project seems to be the first journalistic coverage of the case of any kind in many years, and is the first comprehensive look at Charlton’s life, death and legacy ever published.