Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "crime" ...

  • War crimes and corruption in Yemen

    A collection of stories from AP correspondent Maggie Michael’s groundbreaking investigations of corruption, torture and other war crimes in Yemen.
  • Gone Too Soon: Revisiting the 1983 Murder of Joan Ann Charlton – A Comprehensive Collection of Information, 33 Years Later

    In September 1983, a 19-year-old Jamaican-American freshman from Baltimore, Joan Ann Charlton – who would have been the first member of her family to graduate from college – was found dead of multiple stab wounds on Frostburg State’s campus, a crime that was never solved. This student project seems to be the first journalistic coverage of the case of any kind in many years, and is the first comprehensive look at Charlton’s life, death and legacy ever published.
  • The Numbers Game

    The Naked Truth: Numbers Game examines the inadequate and outdated collection of crime statistics and how this practice skews policing and public policy. Fusion’s Ryan Nerz uncovers the reality behind the numbers. They wrangled raw FBI data to develop key insights into policing in the U.S. Plus, they learned how gaming the numbers can lead to further inequality, discrimination, and in some cases, neglect. Stats may not be sexy, but this data affects how we live our lives every single day, especially if you are black in America. http://tv.fusion.net/story/373011/naked-truth-numbers-game/
  • Analyzing police use-of-force data

    After a yearlong open records battle, the San Antonio Express-News obtained and analyzed a use-of-force database from the San Antonio Police Department. The records showed that officers used force against black and Hispanic suspects at a rate that was up to 78 percent higher than white suspects, yet less than one percent of 5,300 force incidents resulted in any kind of policy violation. The newspaper brought those stunning numbers to life with police suspension records, video, DocumentCloud and interviews with victims -- including an innocent man who was paralyzed after he underwent surgery to treat injuries from a police beating.
  • The Digilantes Try to Find Out Who Is Behind Mugshot.com

    The Digilantes uncovered a multi-million dollar extortion-based industry that’s wreaking havoc upon tens of millions of Americans’ lives, especially minorities. It’s the business of mugshot websites. Operators of these sites scrape public arrest records from online police databases, put them on their own websites, making them easily searchable on Google, and then charge hundreds of dollars to remove them, whether you are guilty or not. These mugshots, which can live forever online, are a form of digital scarlet letter ruining people's’ reputations, job and housing opportunities, even their dating lives. http://fusion.net/story/252451/digilantes-mugshots-dotcom-investigation/
  • Season 1 from Someone Knows Something

    The true crime investigative podcast, Someone Knows Something (SKS), explores a different cold case every season. The first season delved into the mysterious case of five-year-old Adrien McNaughton, who vanished on a family fishing trip in 1972. SKS host David Ridgen, a celebrated documentarian and filmmaker, grew up in the same small town in Eastern Ontario as the McNaughton family. Through his investigation, Ridgen discovers new information about who was present at the lake that day, and uncovers a series of surprising new leads suggesting what might have happened to Adrien, including signals from four cadaver dogs, which suggest that there may be human remains in Holmes Lake, near where Adrien was fishing that day.
  • Second Chance City

    The District is the only place in nation with a law that gives leniency to young adult offenders who repeatedly commit violent crimes.
  • Serbian Government Assets Revealed

    KRIK decided to focus on revealing corruption and crime at the highest levels of power. In late 2015 our team of journalists started to expose the hidden assets of Serbian politicians, as well as their relationship networks and potential wrongdoing. Our first discovery in this field was that Sinisa Mali, the Mayor of Belgrade, has secretly bought 24 resort apartments on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast through offshore companies from British Virgin Islands. This story has attracted huge attention from the Serbian public and it was picked up in all Serbian media. That inspired us to continue to investigate the mayor’s business deals in 2016 but also expand our investigation on other political elites. This one year investigation resulted in publishing a complete database of assets and businesses of all ministers from the new Serbian government in December 2016. https://imovinapoliticara.krik.rs/display/
  • Watched

    Police forces across the United States are stockpiling massive databases with personal information from millions of Americans who simply crossed paths with officers. A person can end up in one of these databases by doing nothing more than sitting on a public park bench or chatting with an officer on the street. Once there, these records can linger forever and be used by police agencies to track movements, habits, acquaintances and associations – even a person’s marital and job status. What began as a method for linking suspicious behavior to crime had morphed into a practice that threatens to turn local police departments into miniature versions of the NSA. In the process, critics contend, police risk trampling constitutional rights, tarnishing innocent people and further eroding public trust.
  • Free to Flee

    In Florida, drunk drivers are routinely not arrested immediately after they cause a fatal crash, even when there’s sufficient probable cause to arrest them. In many cases, the drivers remain free as the investigations drag on for many months, well beyond accepted standards. Our investigation found that dozens of drunk drivers have escaped justice and hundreds more were left on the streets for years before being arrested and convicted, with some committing other crimes while they enjoyed their freedom.