Stories

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 27,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Search results for "cronyism" ...

  • Lifting the lid on Long Island's courts

    Gus Garcia-Roberts and Will Van Sant dug out the hidden details of a fraud and drug investigation or Robert Macedonio, one of Suffolk County's most influential and flamboyant lawyers, that revealed allegations of serious corruption within the district attorney's office and kicked off a year-long effort by Newsday's investigative team to expose secrecy, cronyism and strong evidence of high-level criminality in the operation of the criminal-justice system.
  • Sunny Skies, Shady Characters: Cops, Killers and Corruption in the Aloha State

    A memoir of James Dooley's 30-plus year career as an investigative reporter for print, television and online news outlets in Hawaii. The book focuses on local, national and international organized crime activities in Hawaii, with emphasis on the yakuza (Japanese gangsters) and Hawaii mobsters' ties to the Teamsters Union. Dooley also writes extensively on political cronyism and corruption in local, state and federal government and details the use of public records to pursue stories. The book explores the difficulties and rewards of reporting in an enclosed market like Hawaii and discusses the shrinkage of investigative journalism in the 50th state.
  • The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

    In a series of investigative articles, The Record's Shawn Boburg uncovers political payback, secrecy, conflicts, and cronyism at the Port Authority.
  • Police Power: A Culture of Corruption

    This special investigative show highlights KGTV’s relentless reporting into the San Diego Police Department’s culture and conduct, revealing a culture of cronyism that tolerated corrupt officers, allowed crimes to be covered up and crippled the SDPD’s ability to retain public trust and police San Diego. This reporting led to the criminal conviction of one officer, the appointment of a new police chief, a dual criminal and administrative investigation into the department by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (ongoing at the time of this submission), and several policy changes by San Diego police. Former officer Christopher Hays pleaded guilty and was sentenced to a year in jail and probation in relation to charges he sexual abused women in his custody. The case prompted San Diego Police to establish a new policy requiring two officers to accompany any female in custody.
  • The Insiders

    The series focused on the little-known – but very lucrative – system of court fiduciary appointments. Reporters found that judges had violated state court rules meant to promote transparency and limit cronyism in making appointments and fee awards to a network of politically-connected insiders. Major findings included hundreds of thousands of dollars in improper fee awards, widespread violations of rules by judges across Long Island and questionable expense reports that vendors said had been inflated. Most important, it all had been hidden from the public until Newsday’s reporters brought it to light.
  • Hosed!

    “Hosed” was an investigation on a controversial water services contract proposed between the City of St. Louis and the multinational French corporation Veolia. There were several concerns here, especially given that the deal was done very quietly. The first concern was that the contract was gained through political cronyism, second that the main goal of the contract was a secret plan to privatize city water, and third that as a result of the contract, the city water division would be slashed to bare bones both in terms of staff and safety standards. The latter concern was raised based on the reputation of Veolia in other markets.
  • Social network analysis of high-ranking officials in S. Korean government

    It is a social network analysis-based investigative reporting on high ranking public officials in the Lee Myung-bak administration and his presidential office. Since its launch in 2008, the Lee administration has been criticized for the dark side of spoils system or cronyism in personnel affairs. The JoongAng Ilbo investigated on the "chain of relationships" among 944 high-ranking officials and President Lee for the last four years. We also used text-mining methodology on social media, such as Internet blogs and twitter, which showed the public's sentiments toward the cronyism of the Lee government.
  • "FEMA's Toxic Bureaucracy"

    After nearly a year of reporting, the CBS News Investigative Unit reported a string of "discrimination, sexual harassment and cronyism in the New Orleans" FEMA office. Several staff members went on camera to share stories revealing the "toxic environment" of the FEMA office. Just a day after the story aired, an internal investigation was launched by FEMA, and the Chief of Staff was quickly transferred.
  • Ohio Attorney General: Price of Corruption

    WBNS-TV (Columbus, Ohio) revealed a pattern of corruption inside the state's highest law enforcement office including cronyism, misuse of state funds and property, improper use of campaign funds, ethics violations and cover-up. The reporters found that the Attorney General had used campaign funds to rent a condominium for two of his friends/employees that was later tied to sexual harassment,alleged crimes involving state vehicles and the hub for cronyism. Their reporting revealed that the Attorney General created a "transition fund" as an unregulated 501 c4 non-profit account. Through law enforcement, the station learned that this fund funneled at least $2,000 in inappropriate payments to the Attorney General's friend/employee/condo-mate.
  • The Protected

    One million cars owned by California public employees have license plates that shield their information from prying eyes. That secrecy can enable them to run toll booths and red lights and avoid parking citations. They also signal police that the drivers are "one of their own" or related to someone who is, causing many to let these public employees off with a warning.